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About 15 years ago my grandfater gave me this Colt Shooting Master 357. I have shoot it a few times and it shoots great. Earlier today I called a local gunsmith about it. He told me that its rare and valuable. Does anyone know about this model? It has a pearl handle with a bull engraved on it. Any information?
 

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Very nice and valuable grips. I would get something else to put on it when it’s being shot so you don’t break them.
 

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Damn. The reason I called the gunsmith was because the cylinder latch is stuck. He said it should be an easy fix but closed due to coronavirus. I live in Washington state. So I wont be able open the cylinder for a few weeks.
 

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That's a beauty. Hope you get the problem with the cylinder release straightened out.
Dr.Tramp..........
 

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Squirt some all purpose cleaner/lube/protectant in the areas you can reach. let it stand all saturated & wet , and do it a couple- three times over a few days. You will mor'n'likeley free it up yourself.
That thing is a sweet old revolver.
 

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Yes. Get the entire surface of the gun started with an oil such as Kroil. Let those areas of rust pitting soak for weeks and weeks, occasionally wiping them only with a soft rag. Then let them soak for weeks and weeks more, and employ a brass brush with a LIGHT touch. That rust will go away, and leave the least amount of trace pitting without scratching or thinning the bluing. If you use anything with an abrasive nature, or get impatient with the oil soak, you run the risk of damaging the finish.

And as oberon stated, you may free up the cylinder release in the process. That one is worth bringing back to life in a classy fashion.
 

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Yes. Get the entire surface of the gun started with an oil such as Kroil. Let those areas of rust pitting soak for weeks and weeks, occasionally wiping them only with a soft rag. Then let them soak for weeks and weeks more, and employ a brass brush with a LIGHT touch. That rust will go away, and leave the least amount of trace pitting without scratching or thinning the bluing. If you use anything with an abrasive nature, or get impatient with the oil soak, you run the risk of damaging the finish.

And as oberon stated, you may free up the cylinder release in the process. That one is worth bringing back to life in a classy fashion.
Tip : Before using Kroil or any other oil gently remove the grips, as it may stain the grips.

Beautyfull gun !
 

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Yes. Get the entire surface of the gun started with an oil such as Kroil. Let those areas of rust pitting soak for weeks and weeks, occasionally wiping them only with a soft rag. Then let them soak for weeks and weeks more, and employ a brass brush with a LIGHT touch. That rust will go away, and leave the least amount of trace pitting without scratching or thinning the bluing. If you use anything with an abrasive nature, or get impatient with the oil soak, you run the risk of damaging the finish.

And as oberon stated, you may free up the cylinder release in the process. That one is worth bringing back to life in a classy fashion.
Soaking the corrosion areas in a oil will loosen where the metal has actually been eaten away commonly called rust. The corrosion is still active and will remain active until it is physically removed. Most people do not want to do that to a firearm especially a vintage one such as yours. Short of a refinish keep the firearm well oiled to slow further damage to the finish. If there is rust present on the outside it is likely that it is present where you cannot see it as well.

Good luck with this -- would be worth the effort for me to get this vintage sentimental piece looking as good as possible.
 

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If I were the owner I would get a correctly sized hollow ground screwdriver and very, very carefully remove the pearl grips. They I would mix up a 50/50 batch of Acetone and ATF (Automatic Transmission Fluid), enough to completely submerge the revolver, and put it in something like a Tupperware tub with a tight fitting lid. Do this outside or in a well ventilated area due to the fire hazard and fumes from the Acetone and away from any flame source like a dryer or hot water tank.
Let it sit for a week. Acetone and ATF has been shown to be about the best penetrating solvents out there and can be made for a low cost. See if that frees up the cylinder.
Then, also using a correct set of gunsmith screwdrivers I would remove the sideplate and detail strip and thoroughly clean and then relube the moving parts. If not comfortable doing that, take it to a good gunsmith.
 

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If I were the owner I would get a correctly sized hollow ground screwdriver and very, very carefully remove the pearl grips. They I would mix up a 50/50 batch of Acetone and ATF (Automatic Transmission Fluid), enough to completely submerge the revolver, and put it in something like a Tupperware tub with a tight fitting lid. Do this outside or in a well ventilated area due to the fire hazard and fumes from the Acetone and away from any flame source like a dryer or hot water tank.
Let it sit for a week. Acetone and ATF has been shown to be about the best penetrating solvents out there and can be made for a low cost. See if that frees up the cylinder.
Then, also using a correct set of gunsmith screwdrivers I would remove the sideplate and detail strip and thoroughly clean and then relube the moving parts. If not comfortable doing that, take it to a good gunsmith.
Gave me an idea... I have seen this work as well. Dunk Kit is good stuff. https://cylinder-slide.com/index.php?app=ecom&ns=prodshow&ref=CS0109&sid=768820w9b920x231yc3y93308u8688l1
 

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Other than the fact it was your grandfathers, the grips are probably worth more than the gun, given its condition. As stated above, an oil soak will open the cylinder.
 

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I'd say both the gun and pearl grips are worth about the same separately, a lot. But don't split them up if you are thinking of selling, and honestly, why sell? Keep it.

The condition is not too bad really. But it will have some pitted areas. See those fingerprints on your photo? Those are what cause the rust spots - you must keep a gun's metal surfaces wiped down with a lightly oiled rag after handling it, every time. Do not store it in a leather or synthetic holster or zipper case, they also cause rust at times.

After you carefully take the grips off (do NOT pry them if they are stuck down with old oil), you can get some oil all over it. I like CLP Break-free, available at Walmart. ASK before using any chemical cleaners besides oil, you don't want to ruin that original blueing.

Do NOT consider refinishing it, those few freckles of rust are not that bad for an 80 year old Colt. Do not listen to anyone that says to aggressively scrub it with anything more abrasive than a soft cloth. No steel wool, that's for an expert. If you scratch it worse, the value goes down. Once you stop the rust with some oil, it will look better. The oil will loosen some of the rust scale, carefully wipe it down with a cloth every few days, then reapply a thick coat of CLP. Repeat a few times, but be aware the loos rust particles WILL scratch the bluing too. You must wipe them off, not scrub them against the finish.

The Shooting Master is a desirable model, once considered the top revolver Colt made.
 
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