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When were Pachmayr/Mershon type grip adapters first introduced? I know in Fitzgerald's book Shooting he makes mention of the "gadget", home grip adapters
and that would be late '20s-early '30s.
Thanks in advance.

Tecolote
 

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I believe the Mershons were late -'40's.

The Pachmayrs came later.

Smith & Wesson also had a propritary grip adapter in the '40's - somewhat smaller and not as long - they're rare.

It's not the 'S&W' marked plastic one.
 

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The original S&W grip adapter was a completely different design than the Mershons and comprised of to fitted metal plates that fit completely under the service style grips and extended out between the grip frame and trigger guard in a half moon shape. A piece of black rubber was screwed in-between the two half moon extensions to lower the shooter's hold on the grip frame. They were only made for service style grips and as far as I know were never meant for the Magna style grips that started appearing in the 1930's
 

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Clang's post is complete in explanation.
I am not positive, but think the proprietary S&W grip adaptors were introduced with the S&W 357 magnum either when the revolver was introduced in 1935, or shortly afterwards. I would not be surprised if the pre war S&W literature advertised the grip adaptor as an option for other revolvers, like the K frame M&P, but I don't recall seeing ads for them as acccesories, save for the magnum revolvers.

There are far more expert members than I, but I don't recall Colt offering this accessory in the pre war time frame. I think it was exclusive to S&Ws.

* Dogface6s (or should I call you 6 Actual:)?). information is also correct. Mershon was first, I think shortly after WWII. Eventually, the company was acquired by Pachmayr. The rest is history, as they used to say.....
 

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Yeah, 6 Actual works, too, as does 'Six'... (it had a wonderful tendency to immediately focus the attentions of the junior Officer/NCO at the other end of the handset...)

The Mershons are/were essentially identical to the Pachmayrs, but I think Pachmayr improved the metal clip later in time.

Pachmayr also contracted the 'S&W'-marked versions for the N, K and J frames - the J framed version not being quite as common as one might think.

Most of the revolvers I've run across seemed to have Tylers.

I always liked the grip adapter idea - installed, the weapon's carry size is the same, while the custom wood stocks, or the wrap-around rubbers made the piece larger - not the best of ideas when you're carrying concealed, plus, the rubber versions want to 'catch' on the coat fabric - further illuminating the fact that you're strapped.

Now, if you're truly nostalgic about your older cop/gumshoe stuff - you 'need' a Mershon, and probably a Clark 'Sheriff' holster to complete that LAPD Robbery Homicide look.(cue 'Harlem Nocturne' and the rising cigarette smoke, with the crushed-out Camels in the ashtray next to the empty shot glass and lipstick-stained napkin...)
 

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Yeah, 6 Actual works, too, as does 'Six'... (it had a wonderful tendency to immediately focus the attentions of the junior Officer/NCO at the other end of the handset...)

The Mershons are/were essentially identical to the Pachmayrs, but I think Pachmayr improved the metal clip later in time.

Pachmayr also contracted the 'S&W'-marked versions for the N, K and J frames - the J framed version not being quite as common as one might think.

Most of the revolvers I've run across seemed to have Tylers.

I always liked the grip adapter idea - installed, the weapon's carry size is the same, while the custom wood stocks, or the wrap-around rubbers made the piece larger - not the best of ideas when you're carrying concealed, plus, the rubber versions want to 'catch' on the coat fabric - further illuminating the fact that you're strapped.

Now, if you're truly nostalgic about your older cop/gumshoe stuff - you 'need' a Mershon, and probably a Clark 'Sheriff' holster to complete that LAPD Robbery Homicide look.(cue 'Harlem Nocturne' and the rising cigarette smoke, with the crushed-out Camels in the ashtray next to the empty shot glass and lipstick-stained napkin...)
Now, that's the type of answer I expect from an officer :)! I was a lowly Lance Corp., M.O.S 0331. '71-'73

Many years ago I read a review of the S&W Mod 38 or Mod 49 by LeRoy Thompson. He mentioned that adding aftermarket oversized stocks to small J and D frames increased bulk and therefore, increased the possibility of printing easier under clothing. He suggested mastering these small revolvers using the original stocks. They were designed for maximum concealment with a minimum grip that could control the cartridge it fired. I took this advice to heart. I practiced always with the tiny standard stocks to the point they didn't affect me adversely. A lot of range time with a weapon that has a grip you don't like, or a trigger pull you're not crazy about can be mitigated if you shoot that weapon a lot. You will get used to it and adapt to it's nuances. A target weapon is a completely different story.
When seasons and clothing permit, I carry much larger handguns than I do in very hot himid weather when I wear a lot less clothing and accordingly, carry small frame snubbys in Kramer front pocket holsters in cargo shorts. Unless I'm going into downtown Harrisburg or Philadelphia. I will opt for my plastic Glock 36 or my plastic Walther PPS, Glock 19, or HK USP CT 45., under an Hawaiian or loose fitting shirt for that scenario with a top quality IWB and gun belt. I care little about sweating all over my plastic pistols. A 1953 DS, is a different story! And, I hate shiny guns so anything but blackened stainless is a non starter. I haven't carried my SIGs in years and they are just combat finished carbon steel.

To me, the only viable grip adaptors are the Tylers and the old Mershon/Pachmayrs. As you mentioned, the only area they add size is between the back of the trigger guard and the front strap of the grip frame, no addition to size where it would be detrimental, like a longer grip frame, thicker backstrap, or a thicker grip width. Another plus for those who like to carry snubbys about 50 years old is that this type of grip adaptor enables you to keep the classic Colt or S&W wood stocks on the gun and they still look almost competely stock.

I realized years ago, I would never use rubber stocks for concealed carry. Rubber against any garment material might as welll be adhesive.
 

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It boils down to practice with the piece, and I always found that the Tylers and Mershon/Pachmayrs made the Detective Special and Model 10 snub-nose ergonomic.

Incidentally, they made the GI issue Detective Special comfortable, as well - they're shown in the 1960-dated version of the Army's FM 23-35/AFM 50-17 'Pistols and Revolvers'.
 

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I hope this helps out a bit. I have a issue of "American Rifleman" from 1955 (I think, I need to check for sure, but think it is 1955). In this magazine there is an ad for Mershon Grip Adapters. I don't have any information to share to confirm this, other than what I "heard", but I was under the impression that Mershon was bought by Pachmayr at one time? Give me a day or so and I'll have a go at posting a photo of the ad.
Mark
 

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I said that I would try and post a photo of the Mershon "Sure Grip" Adapter ad from the "American Rifleman" magazine that I had. Well...I tried tonight to take a decent photo and I had a difficult time getting a clear but detailed photo, the ad is very small and I'm not too good with a camera just yet. So, it was a no-go with the photo. The ad is from the Feb. 1955 issue of American Rifleman.
Mark
 
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