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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My question is, once you have sanded and fitted your new black plastic grips to the COLT SAA grip frame,

WHAT DO YOU POLISH THE SANDED AREA WITH?

Thanks,

djh
 

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djh, we have no idea what you are talking about. You need to be more specific. WHAT sanding and fitting are you talking about doing on WHAT black plastic stocks? Just tell us what you are up to and maybe we can help you.
 

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Think I know what he is talking about.

Due to variables,in the angle if the backstrap to frame,to front strap/trigger guard,grips used to be hand fitted to SAAs. If not,there can be a sharp ridge or edge above the straps-which not only looks like hell,but can slice the hand/fingers in shooting.

After sanding,the gloss,is off the black plastic,leaving the sanded area dull,

Is this correct??

So,often just a good rub with a turkish towel can bring back the gloss,but I have used automobile rubbing compound(just a tad!) to get the gloss back and match the rest of the grip.

Hope this is the info you are after and welcome to the Forym!

Bud /forums/images/graemlins/confused.gif
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Daimondback68:

Sorry, I guess I used the wrong word to describe the material of the grip. I should have used Hard Rubber to describe the grip. The Colt Factory used a hard rubber black grip as well as a Walnut grip all the way back to 1873.

If you have any experience with the Single Action Army Revolvers you know that the grip frames are inconstant. Very seldom can you remove a set of grips from one SAA and have it fit another. Grips on an SAA have to be hand fitted.

If you purchase a set of the hard rubber or plastic grips from say Numrich, Brownells or even Colt they will not fit a grip frame perfactley, therfore you have to fit the grip to the frame by sanding the edges until the grip fits properly. When you sand the grip, you take off the shinney edge where you sanded.

My question is what do you polish the sanded edge to restore the look of the edge prior to sanding and fitting the grip to the frame.

I hope this describes what I am asking better.

djh
 

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When sanding stop just short of getting a perfect fit, then finish it with VERY fine sand paper to remove the sanding marks left by coarser sand paper.

Then, polish the sanded areas with a cloth and: Toothpaste, a premium metal polish that's also rated for use on plastic, like Flitz, or buy a polishing "rouge" made for buffing plastics from watchmaker's or knifemaker's supply houses.

I don't recommend power polishing, since many plastics will burn and melt, or even crack from too much heat.

If you've used fine enough sandpaper to finish, toothpaste and some old blue jeans material will do the job, but you'll get faster results with a standard polish.
 

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I use a file and 100# sandpaper to get the shape close. Then I use 200# followed by 00 - 000 steel wool to get the larger scratches out.
Follow this up with a metal polish like Flitz, Mother's, or just good ol' Brasso. These have a mild abrasive that will polish the plastic or hard rubber.

I have used Brasso for years to polish many plastics, like telephones and watch crystals.
 

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Now I got it djh.
I have used Flitz and an old T-shirt to take out sanding marks from grips like the high plastic content laminated type grips. Hand rubbing takes longer, but there is less chance of "burning" or melting the material when using a Dremel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks to all of you for your imput. The reason I wanted to know is, I am redoing an old SAA made back in 1940 that is past it's collectable value. It's real ruff but I wanted to put new grips on it. That's the reason for the question.

Thanks again,

djh
 

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I recently made a pair for a friends 500 Schmitty. I roughed them in with an ax and polished them off with a grinder... Looks sorta good (on a 500 but what would'nt improve its appearence), but I would never attempt making a set for a Colt...

/forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif
 

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All good answers, and the key is to work ALL, from sandpaper to steel wool to Flitz then to jewelers rouge (putz pomade), THEN finally to that old t-shirt.
Handwork is crucial...Stay away from the temptation to use a Dremel for finish-work.
These steps work well w/bonded ivory and stag, too.
The grips on the S&W below took about a day to 'finish fit', but the results were worth the time.
Sorry it's an 'off-brand'.
Don
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I want to thank all of you that responded to my question.

The Flitz worked great on the sanded edges and the grips now look like they were factory fitted.

The old gun will never be what it was but it looks a lot better then it did and it still shoots real good.

Thanks again,

djh
 
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