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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 1962 vintage Python that came with a Hogue Monogrip. I'd like to get the original grips but where would I find them and what do they look like?
 

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Here's a link to a picture of a '60's Colt with the correct type grips.
http://www.gunbroker.com/auction/ViewItem.asp?Item=20383091

As you can see, grips should be walnut, with gold medallions , and have the checkering ending in a semi-circle around the medallions.
There is a "thumb rest" (actually a loading clearance) on one side ONLY.

This style was used as target grips on many models of Colt revolvers in the 1960's.

Unless you can find someone on one of the forums willing to sell you a pair, about the only place they can be found is on Ebay.

You'll need to do a search under "colt grips" and watch. These come up for sale fairly often, but price fluctuates from reasonable to high.

Since you want "correct" '60's grips for your Python, this is the only version of Colt target grip that will be "right".
 

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If you want to sell the grips you have, can I be first in line?
They are for 60's Officer's Model Match revolvers, like the one I have. Wish I could ask you to trade, but the Python grips currently residing on my OMM are for 70's Pythons. Instead of the checkering ending in a semi-circle just under the medallion, they end in a straight line about 1/4" short of the medallions.

When you find the correct grips for your Python (much easier than finding OMM grips) reply to the email I sen tyou or post here and we can try to do a deal.
 

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Joed,

If you like the grips you can get new gold colored emblems and put them in or have them put in without spending much money. Or watch ebay, for $50 to $100 you find some nice ones.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the help. The gun also came with Colt grips that are just like those only with a silver emblem. I didn't realize they were wrong until someone told me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by CMcDermott:
Joed
When you find the correct grips for your Python (much easier than finding OMM grips) reply to the email I sen tyou or post here and we can try to do a deal.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Before we go thru that much trouble (I'm not an expert with Colts) tell me what these are. This is a picture of the gun when I first bought it.

They have silver emblems and someone has stripped the varnish off down to wood. I thought they were the correct grips till I sent the gun to Colt for refurbishing. They told me they aren't correct.





[This message has been edited by joed (edited 07-13-2004).]
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Dfariswheel, I had a feeling the grips weren't walnut but I'm not good with woods.

I too suspected they were from a trooper. The reason for my suspicions were when I found the Python in a pawn shop right next to it was a Trooper. Both guns were in the same shape as if owned by the same person. Both had Hogue Monogrips and looked to be the same age.

I bought the Python but passed on the Trooper only because I'd never seen so much play in a cylinder and I wasn't sure you could get parts for it. Now I have a feeling that whoever pawned these guns mixed up the original grips. Had I bought the Trooper I bet the Python grips were in the box.
 

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These look like the 1960's grips that were used on the original model Colt Trooper revolvers.

These are the same as the grips used on the '60's Python, except with silver medallions, instead of the Python's gold.

In those days Colt usually followed a "standard" of using silver medallions on the cheaper guns, and gold on the Python.

The cheaper gun's grips also were made of cheaper hardwood, while the Python was figured walnut.

As production progressed, Colt began using walnut for all guns, and finally discontinued the silver medallions, going to gold on all guns.

I can't tell from the picture, but these MAY be the early "Second type" grips made for the Trooper, that were NOT walnut.

These early type grips were often made of some fairly soft "hardwood" with a dull oil-type stain/finish finish.

I'd suspect someone switched out the more attractive Walnut Python grips for a set of the less desirable hardwood Trooper grips.

These early Second type Colt target grips usually had some type of an oil finish/walnut stain, not a varnish coating, so they may not have been stripped.

In any case, the "correct" grips for your 1960's Python will look EXACTLY like these grips, except made of American Walnut, and with Gold medallions.
 

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Although I generally agree with the information dfairswheel provides, I must strongly disagree that Colt ever used any wood stocks that were not walnut. While the quality of walnut naturally varies from piece to piece, any Colt with factory wood stocks will have walnut stocks.

I have several revolvers from the 1950s with the full-checkered stocks, and none are particularly figured. The announcement brochure for the Trooper states it has walnut stocks. My early Troopers have walnut stocks.

I checked my catalog files and in wood stock guns, beginning at the end of the Coltwood-stocked revolver era, and find reference only to walnut as the stock material.

My late sister had a solid walnut chest of drawers made of native walnut off her farm that had portions of it that were very plain in grain and fairly light in color. We have walnut trees on our farm and the ones we have taken down varied in grain and color. I am sure the stocks on joed's Python are walnut, but just happen to be of a plain variety.
 

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I'm looking at two early Colt target grips that are being stripped for restoration.

Pair #1 is an early 1960's Second type, exactly like the grips in the above picture.
These are on an early 60's Colt .22LR Trooper.

Pair #2 are a set of early 1950's fully checkered grips on a 1956 Colt .38 Trooper .

Both have silver medallions, and a dull, dark walnut color oil-type finish.

Under the finish, is an almost grain-less Yellow-White relatively soft wood, that DEFINITELY isn't walnut.

In texture, this is MUCH softer than any walnut, and I suspect it's actually birch.

When sanded, it works VERY easily, and forms a sanding dust that's very fluffy.
Totally unlike walnut, but very like birch.

Both these grips are verified factory Colt, original to these Troopers.

This wood appears to be the same wood Colt used on the later production non-walnut grips used on the Mark III revolvers.

These non-walnut Mark III grips are recognizable from the near grain-less wood, which is finished with a weird, light "orange" color finish.
Underneath is the same light Yellow-White soft wood.

So unless Colt was using a Yellow-White soft walnut of unknown species or origin on the first and second type grips, this ain't walnut.


[This message has been edited by dfariswheel (edited 07-15-2004).]
 

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I agree that some wood Colt stocks look pretty odd, but the catalogs say the stock material is walnut for all wood-stocked Colts. As mentioned, I have personal experience with "yellow" walnut. It definitely is not as hard as the darker walnut.

Either the Trooper stocks mentioned are a poor walnut, or Colt was lying in the catalogs.
 

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My 1919-1979 Fitz Grip Co was the aftermarket grip maker of choice to help Colt revolver owners shoot more accurately. I have some Gunfighter and thumb rest Target grips left in my archives file cabinet and will be glad to send pictures and quote 1979 prices.

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Paul Fitz Jones Retired
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Star reloader Reconditioning Center
C-H Saeco Distributor
 
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