Colt Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I joined a year ago but took a break from researching an inherited gun collection on this forum because I was obsessing and doing nothing else. You guys are addictive. Last week I pulled my guns out again and now I've got chair sores and bloodshot eyes from a 5 day marathon of reading and doing research. I've been saving up my questions.

Questions:

  • Why are some people worried about posting weapon serial numbers? It's not like your SS#. What are they concerned about?


  • Besides checking here and Gunbroker - are there other places you recommend to ascertain the value of gun related items like old parts, ammo, boxes, books, magazines, holsters, paperwork, etc.?


  • I'm fascinated by people posting old boxes with serial numbers... Would love to find some that went with my guns but I know I probably have better odds of winning the lottery. Has anybody here ever found the original matched box for their gun?


  • Did all Colt Semi Auto boxes have serial numbers and if so, where on the box is printed?


  • Is Clawson's book on the Government model out of circulation? I only saw 2 posted for sale on the internet... one was $3,000 and the other was $6,000. Is there anything I'll find in there that I won't find in my Goddard book?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,760 Posts
A lot of questions, but I will take the last first. All of Clawson's books have been out of print for quite a few years now. As to the $3000 and $6000 dollar copies, that is just mind blowing.

Second, the Goddard book is not the same type book as Clawson's. While the Goddard book has some excellent records of serial numbers, it does not get into the variations of parts, finishes, stocks, etc., and when they changed. That is where the devil is in the details.

Part of the fun of collecting is sharing with others. Posting full serial numbers of my guns has never bothered me, but I suppose if I was posting someone else's I would not show the full serial number. Story goes that the crook got a serial number off the internet, turned it into the police as stolen, and the police picked up the gun for the crook. Maybe it happened, but have never read where it did, and there is the time line where the serial number appeared on the internet before the crook turned it in as stolen. That, plus the burden of proof is on the crook to prove that the gun is his rather than you having to prove it is yours.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,288 Posts
Some guns change hands uncountable times. Everyone that ever bought a used gun have no way of really knowing its past history and owners. My guess is when we show a gun on the net and somehow the serial # is showing or maybe we are wondering the date of manufacturer is the reason that some probably put a couple X`s at the end of the serial number so unknown people don`t shout, it`s mine, was stolen twenty years ago. Although if they did it wouldn't fly anyway especially if there wasn't a old stolen report. So for the unthinking paranoid, it`s just easy to substitute a X or two at the end of the serial numbers.
I got interested in guns at a early age to the point that I bought every gun rag I could at about 13 years old, (about 64 years ago, not so much now with the net) so that is tons of reading for many years! Now I attend just a show or two a year plus am a member of this site plus a couple more other brand sites just to try to keep up on what my 60 year accumulation/collection is roughly worth. Just a whole lot of reading is your best avenue.
I once knew a body builder at work, the best I ever seen. He told me had he studied a tenth as much as he worked out he could have been a brain surgeon! Poor guy got killed at a young age too!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
971 Posts
Some guns change hands uncountable times. Everyone that ever bought a used gun have no way of really knowing its past history and owners. My guess is when we show a gun on the net and somehow the serial # is showing or maybe we are wondering the date of manufacturer is the reason that some probably put a couple X`s at the end of the serial number so unknown people don`t shout, it`s mine, was stolen twenty years ago. Although if they did it wouldn't fly anyway especially if there wasn't a old stolen report. So for the unthinking paranoid, it`s just easy to substitute a X or two at the end of the serial numbers.
I got interested in guns at a early age to the point that I bought every gun rag I could at about 13 years old, (about 64 years ago, not so much now with the net) so that is tons of reading for many years! Now I attend just a show or two a year plus am a member of this site plus a couple more other brand sites just to try to keep up on what my 60 year accumulation/collection is roughly worth. Just a whole lot of reading is your best avenue.
I once knew a body builder at work, the best I ever seen. He told me had he studied a tenth as much as he worked out he could have been a brain surgeon! Poor guy got killed at a young age too!
I like your answer. I'm a Geezer 68. I too started out early in life. I was about 8. At that age we always had the American rifleman magazine which I devoured from cover to cover. And all sorts of reference books. It helped that my favorite Uncle was a Gun Collector. When he passed there were over 2,000 guns. At least half antique. So at that early age i got to hold a real Colt Walker and just about every percussion revolver made. But as a kid i never paid attention to things like inspectors Mark's or serial numbers. When as kids we played cowboys and Indians i used a Savage percussion revolver, my cousins used what ever they could find that was old.
The best advice i can give you is to gently clean and never use a power any thing to clean your old guns. As kids we destroyed several old pistols by the wire brush cleaning method. Read anything about each item, but be forewarned. As a birthday present for me turning 13 Uncle presented me with a nice used USN rolling block in 50 70 and a box of ammo. He was sure it was real. The dealer I sold it to when I turned 18 thought it was real. It was a Navy Reject. Rear sight was not placed according to the Navy specifications. But now in this day and age we know it was never issued to the Navy. Some times just the placement of things like sights can change a firearms value, and change it drastically too.
I'm still learning every day about Colt SAA models. This forum is a great source of information.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
871 Posts
I joined a year ago but took a break from researching an inherited gun collection on this forum because I was obsessing and doing nothing else. You guys are addictive. Last week I pulled my guns out again and now I've got chair sores and bloodshot eyes from a 5 day marathon of reading and doing research. I've been saving up my questions.

Questions:

  • Why are some people worried about posting weapon serial numbers? It's not like your SS#. What are they concerned about?
I don’t mind posting the serial number, I never bother to hide it.

I have seen the same on bike and car forums, where one theory is that the bad guys could find your home address from your number plate and come and steal your precious Corvette / Escalade / Porsche / Ducati (chose as appropriate).

As to guns, I can’t imagine a bad guy forging the number, committing a crime, and then hope to pin it on the legitimate owner. Maybe also since I live in Switzerland I am not exposed by posting on a US forum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,503 Posts
It may help to have the particulars and some good images of the guns. They may be "weapons" like a 1911 or 1911A1 or firearms like a Government Model. If you want to know what a gun is worth, list it for auction starting at $1.00 with no reserve and let the market decide. As a general rule we all think are guns are worth way more than most folks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,288 Posts
I did 35 years working security yet my wife is far more security conscious than me. All these scams came with the internet. I was raised with no credit cards and of course the internet came later. Today it`s hard to live without a computer or credit cards. My wife seems to think there is tons of people spying on us through the computer and even the phone. Like that`s a lot of people assigned to spy on almost penny-less me! I have found it`s easier to cave in than argue about it. It does make life harder at times as we never order nor sell anything on the net plus not being able to even use a credit card to reserve a motel room! At my age I should be starting to sell off some of my collection but to keep peace I haven't tried--yet. Wife is almost seventeen years younger than me. Some unworthy might end up with my guns. I better start at least shooting a few.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,831 Posts
I've also never had an issue posting a serial number if it adds to the post or discussion in a thread.

IMO, what's much more potentially dangerous, and generally seems to be unknown or ignored, is the posting of images that haven't been scrubbed of all the embedded data in the image. That's one of the reasons that I'll only post images that I had previously uploaded to Imgur or another hosting site that automatically scrubs the embedded data. Just another reason not to use Photobucket, which doesn't scrub the data.

Best regards,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I've also never had an issue posting a serial number if it adds to the post or discussion in a thread.

IMO, what's much more potentially dangerous, and generally seems to be unknown or ignored, is the posting of images that haven't been scrubbed of all the embedded data in the image. That's one of the reasons that I'll only post images that I had previously uploaded to Imgur or another hosting site that automatically scrubs the embedded data. Just another reason not to use Photobucket, which doesn't scrub the data.

Best regards,
I didn't think about the photo metadata. I posted a lot of pictures here last year and didn't scrub. Appreciate the tip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,975 Posts
Regarding this question: "I'm fascinated by people posting old boxes with serial numbers... Would love to find some that went with my guns but I know I probably have better odds of winning the lottery. Has anybody here ever found the original matched box for their gun?"

Yes it is like hitting the lottery, at least as far as the odds go. I bought a 2nd series Colt Woodsman Sport Model in December of 2007 at a local shop. In July of 2010 I happened to be looking on ebay and spotted a correct box with manual and test target which bore a serial #. (The boxes were not numbered for that series). I thought to myself that the serial number was close to mine, and when I checked it was the target for my gun ! I won the auction and afterwards contacted the seller. He was lcoated in a city about 20 miles away from where I bought the gun. I told him that I had the gun and where and when I acquired it. I asked if could share some history of how he happened to have the original box. In fact I asked politely twice. I received no response what so ever. The internet has made pairings of original boxes and guns more likely but the odds are still astronomical. I have read of a few similar stories on other gun forums but not many.

Regarding serial numbers, it seems more people obsess over why people don't post them than is justified. When I share a number, saying it is something like "the low 14,000 range" is generally adequate for discussion purposes. I also feel that the complete number is my own business and people aren't entitled to it unless I feel like sharing.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Regarding this question: "I'm fascinated by people posting old boxes with serial numbers... Would love to find some that went with my guns but I know I probably have better odds of winning the lottery. Has anybody here ever found the original matched box for their gun?"

Yes it is like hitting the lottery, at least as far as the odds go. I bought a 2nd series Colt Woodsman Sport Model in December of 2007 at a local shop. In July of 2010 I happened to be looking on ebay and spotted a correct box with manual and test target which bore a serial #. (The boxes were not numbered for that series). I thought to myself that the serial number was close to mine, and when I checked it was the target for my gun ! I won the auction and afterwards contacted the seller. He was lcoated in a city about 20 miles away from where I bought the gun. I told him that I had the gun and where and when I acquired it. I asked if could share some history of how he happened to have the original box. In fact I asked politely twice. I received no response what so ever. The internet has made pairings of original boxes and guns more likely but the odds are still astronomical. I have read of a few similar stories on other gun forums but not many.

Regarding serial numbers, it seems more people obsess over why people don't post them than is justified. When I share a number, saying it is something like "the low 14,000 range" is generally adequate for discussion purposes. I also feel that the complete number is my own business and people aren't entitled to it unless I feel like sharing.

Thanks Walter - I was hoping to hear that someone actually found "the" box for their gun. That way I don't feel silly for casually looking. As for posting serial numbers... I've not obscured or hid mine at all... it just didn't occur to me. However if you read enough you start to notice themes. And that's one I noticed.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,095 Posts
Box's? I accumulate police hammerless.
What is the first thing a policeman does
when he gets his new pistol......
Throws out the box!
Just ask my Son the Police Detective.
Every pistol he's had he has tossed the box. LOL

So when I find a police pistol I want to buy,
I never ask if there is a BOX. I know the answer....

I don’t mind posting the serial number, I never bother to hide it.
I like others who post their serial numbers.
That is how you find consecutive serial numbers in OLD guns.
I have found:
Colt 1903 417 to go with 418 that I had.
Colt 10885 to go with 10886.
Lucky yes
But I often check serial numbers
with what I have to see how close I can get.

unless you call the factory and request consecutive serial numbers.
I have done that. Got 8 in a row. $$
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,613 Posts
Actually, (and with no disrespect intended) that's the worst advice you can give.:)

NEVER, EVER "clean" any old firearm that you think might have some value. You might want to soak it in oil and let it drip dry, but do nothing more. Next, obtain professional advice on what to do next.

Bud



I like your answer. I'm a Geezer 68. I too started out early in life. I was about 8. At that age we always had the American rifleman magazine which I devoured from cover to cover. And all sorts of reference books. It helped that my favorite Uncle was a Gun Collector. When he passed there were over 2,000 guns. At least half antique. So at that early age i got to hold a real Colt Walker and just about every percussion revolver made. But as a kid i never paid attention to things like inspectors Mark's or serial numbers. When as kids we played cowboys and Indians i used a Savage percussion revolver, my cousins used what ever they could find that was old.
The best advice i can give you is to gently clean and never use a power any thing to clean your old guns. As kids we destroyed several old pistols by the wire brush cleaning method. Read anything about each item, but be forewarned. As a birthday present for me turning 13 Uncle presented me with a nice used USN rolling block in 50 70 and a box of ammo. He was sure it was real. The dealer I sold it to when I turned 18 thought it was real. It was a Navy Reject. Rear sight was not placed according to the Navy specifications. But now in this day and age we know it was never issued to the Navy. Some times just the placement of things like sights can change a firearms value, and change it drastically too.
I'm still learning every day about Colt SAA models. This forum is a great source of information.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Actually, (and with no disrespect intended) that's the worst advice you can give.:)

NEVER, EVER "clean" any old firearm that you think might have some value. You might want to soak it in oil and let it drip dry, but do nothing more. Next, obtain professional advice on what to do next.

Bud
Well you scared me. I've been using this silicon gun & reel cloth to wipe them after I handle them. I also bought a few pairs of white cotton gloves if I'm going to spend more time with them versus just checking a marking or two when I research. Sometimes the silicon cloth leaves too much stuff (silicon?) on them and I'll wipe lightly with a clean cloth after to remove the excess.

Should I not be doing this?

Cleaning cloth.jpg
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top