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good afternoon , can someone please tell me when colt switched form the half-moon front sight to the ramped serrated style for there officla police and detective special production. many thanks rj
 

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About 1947. Between 1947 and 1949 Colt's made several changes to these models including barrel markings, trigger, hammer, cylinder latch, frame and stocks.
 

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Just to elaborate on Bushwakers fine summation of the "postwar changes" Colt made in 1947-48; not "yelling" but THESE ARE NOT ETCHED IN STONE,as Colt used up most of the old pre war parts in 1946; Front sight did go to a "slanted ramp"(a word of warning,that is best seen in Charles Pate's book on U.S. Military Handguns of W.W. Two; many Commandos were rebarreled from 4" to 2"(much rarer!!-and expensive")with post war barrels to be used by the CID and some other personel and these have the ramp sight & newer Colt company name.(I tried like hell to get one in 'nam for a "back up",but no dice) So be wary before ya shell out big bucks for an "original 2"). Triggers went from being finely checkered to grooved. Cylinder latches lost their checkering(only the Shooting Master was smooth for prewars).The frame went to a single screw & spring & cup to hold the cylinder in vs, the earlier screw and rounded "pin". Stocks,went to "Coltwood".Changes in Colt corporate names are best found in Wilson and Sutherland. I have often wondered how much actual $$ per gun these "shortcuts" saved,and in view of declining production in the late 50's,how much it "saved"."Beancounters"(accountants)were seemingly more valued than "craftsmen" in Hartford after the war,and probably up the river in Springfield too,as it was a "sellers market"in the late 40's to early 50's(then Korea) to gun starved Americans,but this was the same for many products in the postwar era. Bud
 

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Lonewolf: Thanks, of course you're right - Colt never threw away any parts, they were "phased out". The dualtone finish was another cost saver, as less polishing was required.
My favorite story from the old days at the factory (pre-union): If a gun came back for repair and it was determined that it was defective, not something caused by the customer, the foreman checked the inspector's mark, put it on his bench, and he got to repair it after he punched out, on his own time. Pretty good incentive for the inspector to do a better job in the first place! That's why I like those depression era Colts, as they were built right.
 

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You mustve read that "staying after work",with no overtime story also! people today consider it "barbaric",but I guess some would say I am "barbaric' making my students stay after school,to do a better job on a homework paper that they rushed through! Complaints from parents?maybe a couple,but I've taught nearly 40 years in a Private school,and parents pay the "big bucks" for this kind of "attention". I really doubt if very few Colts came back in the pre-1946 era! These were good paying jobs,had prestige and workers felt their product reflected them personally;sadly,we shant see this quality again from an "assembly line". While i hate to generalize on certain "eras" producing less than top quality guns,the immediate postwar era,as I said tended to be a sellers market,and some of the gun scribes in the early 50's lamented the quality(especially bluing & fit,of these guns compared to "pre wars,and,as I said,Colt was not the only one these articles cited. Ironically,dual tone,or duo tone,had,IMO a functional use! Bud
 
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