Colt Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
156 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've used a simple firesafe for years to keep my firearms locked up. Recently I purchased another firesafe which is larger and as it turns out is also waterproof. Yesterday I see a sticker on the inside lid which I had ignored previously that stated, *Not for Firearm storage* or words to that effect. Looking through the owners manual I read that all of this companys firesafes have insulation which contains moisture. Also, it says that the waterproofing rubber gasket may cause water to condensate on the inside of the safe. That's about the stupidest thing I ever heard of. Why not just hide your documents by taping them to the outside bottom of you toilet tank to protect them just as well from fire?? Anyhow, I've used the regular non watertight firesafe for 15 years to keep my firearms in without them rusting. Should I just yank the rubber gasket out of the new one or should I look for something else altoghether? I'd hate to have my Python re-blued from the Colt factory only to have the finish start rusting away while it's locked up.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
7,326 Posts
We've had good luck with these . Sold hundreds over the past 5-6 years . www.gunvault.com
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,971 Posts
As I understand it the whole purpose of fireproof safes is to protect the contents which they assume to be valuable papers and jewelry etc. The insulation material, of fireproof safes, is supposed to emit moisture under extreme heat to keep paper products (and gun stocks) from spontaneous combustion and start a fire inside the safe. It ( the moisture) would have no affect on jewelry which is usually gold, a noble metal, that doesn't rust from moisture. I think that is why they do not recommend storing guns in a fireproof safe.
I, for one, do not use fireproof safes. I have a very sturdy, non-fireproof safe located in the furthest room in the house that is away from all electrical and appliances and probably the last place to burn, if a fire was to start. If the whole was house was to burn to the ground, I doubt any safe could keep firearms from damage from heat, moisture and water. You do the best you can and hope for the best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
I have found that dessicants (both chemical and the 'Goldenrod type do an excellent job of keeping my guns dampness-free in my fire-rated safe.
We have experienced one house fire, and I'll share this with everybody: It probably won't be the heat, smoke or flames that will raise hell with the contents of your safe OR your house...It will be the water used to extinguish the fire.
Don
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
156 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Where would be a good place to find the dessicants? Also, would you recommend lining the safe with any type of carpeting, say indoor/outdoor or something? Thanks for the advice here so far. My mothers home once had a house fire and man, they really flooded the place to extinguish that fire. I remember seeng almost 3 feet of water in her basement alone so maybe the waterproof safe wouldn't be a bad thing after all! Not that I'm planning on having a fire (who does?) but stuff like that happens.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,277 Posts
Just a note on the side:

It's good to try to prevent any damage to your property during a fire but maybe it's a good idea to first look for the things you can do to prevent a fire.

In my years as a firefighter I have seen numerous of times in which victims of fires had taken almost no meassures to prevent fire or to minimise the damage caused by a starting fire. A lot of damage you fear happens when the big red trucks have rolled in and started pumping water in your house. Try to prevent that by installing smoke-detectors and fire-exstinguishers in your house. Most fires start small and can be easily put out if you know what to do.

P.S. Three feet of water in the basement tells me the Fire Department did a good job! Most fires I wittnessed with basements meant that afterwards we had to pump them empty because they were flooded to the ceiling.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top