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So what’s the asking price? Now that you know it’s refinished you have your negotiating points.
 

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This is my GP's 1916 that was refinished. It has been in the family since new. This is what it should look like.
View attachment 740969
This is not a rocking horse.
This is my GP's 1916 that was refinished. It has been in the family since new. This is what it should look like.
View attachment 740969
This is not a rocking horse.
That is what I was referring to. The rampant colt is "standing" on a small base with a semi-circular bottom. A book I have referred to that as the "rocking horse" or "rocking pony" - and that was my point. The full circle is not correct - as was pointed out. My photos were before and after pictures of my 1916 SAA.
 

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I am not an expert on these and would appreciate some feedback from those more knowledgeable than me. Colts website puts it at 1916. Thanks.
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YES. The "restorer" made at least one mistake, he re-stamped with a Circled Rampant Colt. That would be what some call an anachronism.
 

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This is a great thread for the noobie or the guys that like to have their memories refreshed. As soon as I saw it I thought refinished. Now I like refinished gun but don't want to pay what an original will bring. I like some of the observations that were mentioned especially the one that I missed.
 

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That is what I was referring to. The rampant colt is "standing" on a small base with a semi-circular bottom. A book I have referred to that as the "rocking horse" or "rocking pony" - and that was my point. The full circle is not correct - as was pointed out. My photos were before and after pictures of my 1916 SAA.
The rocking horse was caused by a broken die. It will have a partial circle at the bottom of the stamp. They are considered rare or hard to find because it was a small window between when the die broke and when use was discontinued. The circle had long been gone by 1916.
 

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The case colors looks way too "dramatic" to be original. I think it is an excellent refin. All the numbers/letters/legends look nice and crisp. Also, there isn't any dishing around the screw holes.
 

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I steered this guy here from the facebook page. In one of the pics he posted there I could see some pitting in one of the cylinder flutes that had been blued over. I knew you guys would have more answers.
 

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Could the restorer have intentionally stamped the frame with the circled rampant Colt as his signature of sorts to indicate a restoration? Maybe he just selected the wrong die or, that was the only one he had .
 

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The rocking horse was caused by a broken die. It will have a partial circle at the bottom of the stamp. They are considered rare or hard to find because it was a small window between when the die broke and when use was discontinued. The circle had long been gone by 1916.
Correction-the "rocking horse" logo was not created by a broken die,if you'll look close @ the rocker under the hoof you'll see an additional line making the rocker complete which is not there in the original die stamping.
 

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I forgot something,there's an old thread on here somewhere about the rocking horse w/pictures so u can see that there are more lines under the hoof in the stamping that wouldn't there if it was a broken die.
 

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I forgot something,there's an old thread on here somewhere about the rocking horse w/pictures so u can see that there are more lines under the hoof in the stamping that wouldn't there if it was a broken die.
Here you go, Jim. I found one old thread that shows a closeup of the stamp in one of the posts.
 

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Circle pony was discontinued in 1912.
Semi circle (rocking horse-broken dies-and intentional) was sporadic through to 1930's. But always more typically a stand alone pony.
Cylinder bevel is right, hammer knurling is right (but makes me wonder if it wasn't redone) . Front sight isn't right. But you could argue that one. Don't believe the caliber marking on the barrel is right.
 

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Here you go, Jim. I found one old thread that shows a closeup of the stamp in one of the posts.
Thanks for posting this,I'd never know how to find it,once u scroll down to the closeups of the logo it's very obvious that it's not a broken die.I've known about this for more yrs. than I care to remember,besides that I've owned one of these for about 50 yrs.When the new 44 book by John Taffin comes out it will probably be in the last chapter.
 

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Thanks for posting this,I'd never know how to find it,once u scroll down to the closeups of the logo it's very obvious that it's not a broken die.I've known about this for more yrs. than I care to remember,besides that I've owned one of these for about 50 yrs.When the new 44 book by John Taffin comes out it will probably be in the last chapter.
Here’s older pictures of your guns in a Taffin article showing and mentioning the “rocking horse” feature. Among your other great .44s pictured here...

 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
So what’s the asking price? Now that you know it’s refinished you have your negotiating points.
I am not buying it a friend of mine owns it and wanted opinions on weather it was original or refinished. He did not get taken or anything more just curious.
 

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The modern "color case hardening" vs. the original type case hardening I noted in
the first photo. That was the definitive mark of a refinish. Nobody does the old
type case hardening anymore since the process used arsenic. That's a "no-no"
in todays workplace.
 

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The modern "color case hardening" vs. the original type case hardening I noted in
the first photo. That was the definitive mark of a refinish. Nobody does the old
type case hardening anymore since the process used arsenic. That's a "no-no"
in todays workplace.
I believe arsenic was used in the old days to case harden low carbon steel parts, but I think Colt didnt use that on the frame, they used the actual 'high heat no oxygen carbon packing' method that shops like Turnbull do today.
 
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