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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In this case I wonder about freezing a small metal part that is balking at going back into the niche it came from.

It's a small part about 1 inch long by 1/4 inch wide, formed like a small trough that serves as the cartridge guide in a .22 l r semi-auto.
Removed for a through cleaning, it popped out of it's divot with no trouble; but now appears about .025 too long to go back.
No reasonable amount of finger pressure will re-seat it....(No hammers allowed :D)

To the question of putting it in the freezer for a while. Will it draw up a noticeable amount, or waste my time ?

Thanks.
 

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Could you use a small piece of wood, like the end of a ruler, to place pressure on the center, thus pulling the sides in just enough to seat it? Alternatively, you could use a piece of wood just wide enough to pressure each side of the trough with the idea that the sides will flex just enough to seat it. At the factory it almost certainly went in cold and fast.
 
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That'll teach you clean those damned .22s...

I really doubt that freezing's the answer - metal shrinkage (if any) would be minimal - and remember, these .22s are the one sporting firearm that's exposed to all manner of inclement outdoor pursuits like running a trapline, so they pretty much 'have' to function without fault.

There should be copies of the old 'Gun Digest' and 'NRA' disassembly instruction books available at your local Public Library - they feature complete parts schematic and disassembly/reassembly instructions, along with tips on various idiosyncracies.

Look there, and Good Luck!
 

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A good rule is, if it was there when you got it, it'll go back in.
Probably you have to position it just the right orientation for it to fit.

You seldom see .22 rifle parts that are so closely fitted that they require some special tool or method to reassemble.
Stop and just look at it for a couple of minutes.
Turn it in various ways and try fitting from different sides and angles.

Tell us what rifle it is and someone may know how to install it.
 

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A good rule is, if it was there when you got it, it'll go back in.
Probably you have to position it just the right orientation for it to fit.

You seldom see .22 rifle parts that are so closely fitted that they require some special tool or method to reassemble.
Stop and just look at it for a couple of minutes.
Turn it in various ways and try fitting from different sides and angles.

Tell us what rifle it is and someone may know how to install it.
Not enough coffee today. Quite right. If it fell out, it'll fall back in. Figuring how it fell out is the trick.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks guys.
I got some pictures I can post up later for further clarification; but for now the "freezing" as noted by DF6 does nothing to help, except it did give me pause to step-back and give it a good "think" like dfariswheel suggests. And as po18guy says, "if it fell out, it'll fall back in" !...(Soon's I figure out which way it fell.) :D

Actually I have access to several of the books dogface suggest, so I'll figure it out. (With ya'lls help.)
 

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Was thinking that a "trough" shaped part may have to go in rotated/tilted to one side, then "rolled" into place.
 
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In this case I wonder about freezing a small metal part that is balking at going back into the niche it came from.

It's a small part about 1 inch long by 1/4 inch wide, formed like a small trough that serves as the cartridge guide in a .22 l r semi-auto.
Removed for a through cleaning, it popped out of it's divot with no trouble; but now appears about .025 too long to go back.
No reasonable amount of finger pressure will re-seat it....(No hammers allowed :D)

To the question of putting it in the freezer for a while. Will it draw up a noticeable amount, or waste my time ?

Thanks.

I'm sorry but what Make and Model are we discussing?
Tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
I have always been told there are two guns in wide usage that are best to be field stripped only and not fully disassembled.
To the next post please for a picture. And further info.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I have always been told there are two guns in wide usage that are best to be field stripped only and not fully disassembled.
The Colt 1903 pocket hammerless, and the Remington nylon 66. I would add my opinion the S&W New Departure safety hammerless, known as the "lemon squeezer" is no picnic either.

The one giving me the "vapors" is the one many of you have stashed in the back of your closet that you got for your 13th birthday; The Remington Nylon 66.
It is one I recently bought, an Apache Black from 1966 to go along with two of it's cousins, a late 1959, (first year) Mohawk Brown and a clip fed model "Mohawk 10C" a spring chicken made in 1975.

Colt forum....Colt smithing sub-forum, I realize and I apologize for straying. But you have to admit when it comes to gun knowledge, any gun, we have about the best rounded group of "free" gunsmithing advice there is !
While chilling a metal part to ease installation was the original question, the part still remains outside the place it belongs 5 days later so help is requested at this time.

To be clear I have had my 59' down two times before, and while this part is certainly the most obstinate it was never this bad. It is the cartridge feed insert.

To the picture of which part I reference.

View attachment 446042 You can enlarge by clicking on the image. The + mark on the pic will enlarge further. The metal feed insert you can see most of has the little spot of blue trash.

All books I have by J.B. Wood state to install from the bottom as does the guru of nylon rifles, a gent by the youtube name of "Louie Mcgoo". The very comprehensive videos by Louie McGoo show it going in with a bit of tinkering, same as I remember my 59' doing. One large difference is Wood says back end seated first, McGoo says, (and shows) front end seated first. ??
I on the other hand can't seem to get either end seated ! :D

Note: I haven't been long buying this gun and knew the action felt very sluggish. Apparently the past owners disregarded completely the advice of Remington to leave off any and all lubricant. That sludge in the picture is mostly from ignoring that rule. I just couldn't leave it alone with no cleaning. The insert of course is removed now but I don't have a separate picture. I'll be happy to take one if anyone wants to see it by itself.

To Tom, (prewoodsman), man I sure wish my fitment troubles were for a Woodsman; I'd be calling on you for sure. :D

Thanks for suggestions. (No geta bigga hammer please. )
 

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ponyup,
In the event you do not have the Remington Nylon 66 Field Service Manual, I have attached a link.

http://stevespages.com/pdf/remington_66_field_service_manual.pdf

Positive results will prevail with patience.
And, I do know a Nylon 66 expert should it become necessary. Sent me a message (address below) and I will make contact for your benefit.
Regards,
Tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I wanted to get back on subject and post a final comment, and a picture or two.

I got the part installed last Thursday night with a kind of strange helper. (( In addition to you guys ! )
For some odd reason during the day it dawned on me to make a small "tether" of dental floss.... Sure enough it gave me a "handle" to keep the part in place till I could get it in position as per the instructions link posted by prewoodsman. I might add those instructions are the opposite of others I have observed.

At any rate I have the little hellion back where it started, and a much cleaner gun to boot.
Pictures of the cartridge feed outside the gun, and in place. (Cartridge feeds fro R to L as pictured in the stock / receiver.

Apache cartridge insert 002.JPG Apache cartridge insert 004.JPG Apache cartridge insert 008.JPG

Thanks to all who commented.
 

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Looks like it might have rotated or tipped back in rear to front?
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Rear to front is correct; starting by inserting from the bottom of the receiver / stock through the opening left by the removed trigger guard. Not easily seen when not in hand but it is closely fitted left, right, and front to rear. Best I can tell it is the only machined metal part, ( along with the barrel and it's hold-down), in the gun. All the other metal is stamped.

I tried fitting the first several times from a youtube video that is supposedly by the worlds best "nylon" expert, but his vid and verbal instructions don't match the one posted by prewoodsman or a later one I found by J.B. Wood in an old Gun Digest.
Oddly enough I have had a nylon 66 apart at least two other times years ago and encountered no problems I can recall.
 
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