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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
The Holster is made by El Paso Saddlery and is for a colt model M. I have taken pictures of all the markings I can find. I don't know if any of them help with determining the date of manufacture. Any help is appreciated.

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I am not seeing any pictures here, but El Paso Saddlery was re-opened(?) by Bob McNellis in the early 1970's. So you may have one of his holsters.

On doing some checking, there also was an El Paso Saddlery Co. that renamed itself from Andrews & Hill in July 1890. The reason for the new name was that Andrews & Hill wanted to expand their product line from hardware and sporting goods to include harness and saddles.

I never asked Bob McNellis if he had started a new business, or if he had bought a former one to continue. Bob made reproduction holsters and cartridge belts of the "old west" style.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The no pictures has me baffled. I see them, does no one else? if so i will repost. The makers mark is:
El Paso Saddlery Co
MAKER
El Paso Tex

Scratched on the lower part of the Belt loop is 44 in a box WBD arranged vertically
 

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I am not seeing any pictures here, but El Paso Saddlery was re-opened(?) by Bob McNellis in the early 1970's. So you may have one of his holsters.

On doing some checking, there also was an El Paso Saddlery Co. that renamed itself from Andrews & Hill in July 1890. The reason for the new name was that Andrews & Hill wanted to expand their product line from hardware and sporting goods to include harness and saddles.

I never asked Bob McNellis if he had started a new business, or if he had bought a former one to continue. Bob made reproduction holsters and cartridge belts of the "old west" style.
Oh for goodness sakes, this has been covered here before. The original El Paso Saddlery went out of business in 1902; that information is in many cowboy collectibles references and verified by both contemoraneous (1897) newspaper articles and by Bob McNellis himself in his 1976 article just before he opened a new company but with the same name.

That company had been sold; and went out of business because one William Shelton, a partner in the old EPS, then started up the famous Shelton-Payne Arms that was most famous then for selling arms to one Pancho Villa. That company continued until 1931 when it became Don Thompson Inc. (Shelton died in '33) and remained so until the end of 1948 when that company, too, failed.

Bob states in a second article that he 'looked around for a name' after he bought the machinery etc. from the prior owner of Myres, a chap named LaCroix, in '78; the Myres name was sold separately to a chap named Duclos who still owns it. The present El Paso Saddlery is NOT related to the original company nor to Myres; nor was Myres ever related to the original El Paso Saddlery. Simply myths perpetuated (to their advantage) by the current owners of today's El Paso Saddlery. Because the makers marks take an expert to tell from the originals of 100 years ago, the modern ones are quite literally counterfeits; the O.P.'s is modern in more obvious ways than the makers mark (not least being the little fitment stamps that are entirely a late 20th century creation).

So the dating answer is . . . after 1978 when the new company was incorporated in that year as R.E.M. Industries (for Robert E. McNellis who died very early this century). Surprisingly he also used an R.E.M. Industries makers mark (I think the GOVT. 45 stamp likely came out of our inventory at Bianchi Holsters; JB and Bob were good friends and the former bought collectible outlaws' guns from Bob (and maybe they were genuine, JB!)).

1 rem mark.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks, it's what i thought but wasn't sure of the history of the El Paso Saddlery Co.. So now i know.
 

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EPS made a bunch of holsters with the 'US' embossing, but they never held a military contract - they even did fantasy left-handed M1916s for southpaws, but Uncle Sam never issued such.
 

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The question about the holster brought back a whole slew of memories. I was part of a whole group of “irregulars” that used to hang out at El Paso Saddlery, in my case from about 1987 through 1999. I was a new Border Patrol Agent assigned to Station One, the main station, and I needed to get a holster for my personally owned revolver, S&W model 28, that I was being allowed to carry. One of my coworkers suggested I go down there and get a holster. Well, I went over to the “Saddlery” and met Bobby Mc Nellie. After talking to him, and looking around the shop, I think he took pity on me, as he often did with unique souls and stray dogs. He invited me to drop in on Saturday mornings when a eclectic group of firearm enthusiasts, old west amateur historians, dentists, border lawmen, and who knows what else would gather and then go to breakfast. Stories, experiences, and lies were told, guns, holsters, and accoutrements swapped or sold. Those times were some of my fondest memories.

But to get back to the holster, I would have to say no, there is no way to accurately date it, other than to say it was made since Bobby opened the Saddlery. It could even have been made since his son Ryan took over management in 1998 (I think). The only thing that might allow you to get a feel for age might be if there were records at the Saddlery of when they purchased that particular makers stamp, and that’s not to likely. The holster was a standard catalog item, made to order. Bobby would sometimes make a whole group of holsters, of one type or another, on order for resale by various vendors, like Sportsman Guide. I can’t ever remember him or his people “scratching” in a number like that. The holster appears to be in great shape, so I would just enjoy it and use it.
 
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