Colt Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
481 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Just taken delivery of the SA I asked about few weeks ago.
As per the letter it was shipped to New York Office in 1880, as a civilian gun.
Has the H.N. stamp only on the frame, so not a condemned gun but an over run frame only.
Has Belguim proofs on cyl and tiny proof under barrel.
From the grandson I purchased it from.

My Grand father Walter Scott born in England 1860, purchased the colt 45 in Naples Italy sometime in the 1880s, while on route to Australia.
He settles in Western Australia and started a cattle ranch and was quiet successful where he travelled to New South Wales and started another cattle station around the Newcastle area,(family property still today).
He passed away in 1937, and the colt was passed to the eldest son Walter Scott. Walter passed away in 1947, and my father Herbert Scott traveled to W.A to wind up the affairs of the property and returned to Newcastle property with the colt.( A Transscript of the items listed shows the colt by serial number)
My father cared for the colt, until he gave it to me Walter Herbert Scott prior to his death 1978.
I have continued to care for the colt utill recently when I decided to sell it to Tony Rendell.
This is the first time it has been out of the family since new.
Unfortunately in 1952 the family home went under water in the historic maitland floods for two weeks, the floods were very corrosive and the colt lost all its finish.It was always keeped in its colt cardboard box in the rolltop desk.
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,478 Posts
Very very neat to have the "story" of the colt and who owned it for all those years!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
482 Posts
Hi There,

I noticed in one of the pics that the cylinder has a Belgian
proof mark on it. I don't know if Italy used the proofing
house at Liege, Belgian but it would be interesting to know
how that proof mark got there.

Very neat revolver! Too bad about the flood.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
20,523 Posts
To me, having a gun that may have started out to be be a Cavalry, but ended up being a commercial that was exported is a great history. In addition, all of the information about previous ownership in the Scott family just adds to its great history.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
481 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
It is interesting about the liege proofs. I am not sure either if Italy used them. Its the first colt I have seen with the proofs.Weather Colt shipped the entire 250 or not, who knows. I have found these two importers in Europe that Colt shipped to , but not Belguim.

Richter& Company Adolfo
Manila, Philippine Island
Erfurt Germany


Societedes Pandreries Cartoucheries
Helleniques Section Armes
Athens,Greece

I forgot to mention, the bore and chambers are close to perfect, bright and shiny, hammer sears are near perfect.Walter said he dose not think his father ever shot the gun, and it has not been fired since he aquired it in 1978.
The grips do look to be origional, but they have been cut in half and held together with some sort of rivet .They proberly swelled after being under water and mud for two weeks. Walter was only about 10 at the time of the flood, but he remembers finding the colt with his father after the water went down, and they took it to a gunsmith to be cleaned up.Thats all he can remember.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,651 Posts
Just taken delivery of the SA I asked about few weeks ago.
As per the letter it was shipped to New York Office in 1880, as a civilian gun.
Has the H.N. stamp only on the frame, so not a condemned gun but an over run frame only.
Has Belguim proofs on cyl and tiny proof under barrel.
From the grandson I purchased it from.

My Grand father Walter Scott born in England 1860, purchased the colt 45 in Naples Italy sometime in the 1880s, while on route to Australia.
He settles in Western Australia and started a cattle ranch and was quiet successful where he travelled to New South Wales and started another cattle station around the Newcastle area,(family property still today).
He passed away in 1937, and the colt was passed to the eldest son Walter Scott. Walter passed away in 1947, and my father Herbert Scott traveled to W.A to wind up the affairs of the property and returned to Newcastle property with the colt.( A Transscript of the items listed shows the colt by serial number)
My father cared for the colt, until he gave it to me Walter Herbert Scott prior to his death 1978.
I have continued to care for the colt utill recently when I decided to sell it to Tony Rendell.
This is the first time it has been out of the family since new.
Unfortunately in 1952 the family home went under water in the historic maitland floods for two weeks, the floods were very corrosive and the colt lost all its finish.It was always keeped in its colt cardboard box in the rolltop desk.
tony56, What a great story! It is RARE to have so much history on a Colt SAA. As for the lost finish, it will tone back to a patina over time. I would NEVER refinish it, because then it will all look very questionable - and that will be irreversible.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top