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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have a 60 year old 2nd Gen Colt Single Action Army commemorative model that I bought a few months ago. It had never been shot but I had a gunsmith look it over and he said the timing was good and it should make a nice shooter so I took it to the range and shot around 100 rounds through the gun. I took it home and cleaned it and put it away but looking it over a week or so ago I noticed that when cocking it the trigger guard felt like it moved a bit so I got out my trusty Brownells SAA screwdriver set and checked and sure enough, the three screws securing the trigger guard to the frame were a little loose (maybe 1/4 turn). I snugged them up and the gun feels tight again but it got me to wondering, is this normal or should I have the gun looked at in more detail? Or just check the screws periodically to make sure they are snug? The hammer screw was also a little loose and the screws securing the back strap to the frame were also a little loose. I didn't over-tighten them but just carefully snugged them all up.
 

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We have a bunch of Uberti Cattleman revolvers that we use for Cowboy Action Shooting. I check screws as routine before each match. Mary had an ejector housing fly off while shooting her stage. Fortunately, everything was found - including the screw. She wasn't happy. That's when I started checking all the screws.

I don't use any kind of thread locker because I clean them often.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
We have a bunch of Uberti Cattleman revolvers that we use for Cowboy Action Shooting. I check screws as routine before each match. Mary had an ejector housing fly off while shooting her stage. Fortunately, everything was found - including the screw. She wasn't happy. That's when I started checking all the screws.

I don't use any kind of thread locker because I clean them often.
I had that happen with my son's gun at the range. We found all the parts except the screw but his is a Colt Cowboy so I just ordered a replacement for it online. I don't care if it's original to the gun or not. I used a dab of blue loctite on it and it hasn't come out since.

I guess I'll just start checking them at each cleaning (which is always right after shooting).
 

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I have a 60 year old 2nd Gen Colt Single Action Army commemorative model that I bought a few months ago. It had never been shot but I had a gunsmith look it over and he said the timing was good and it should make a nice shooter so I took it to the range and shot around 100 rounds through the gun. I took it home and cleaned it and put it away but looking it over a week or so ago I noticed that when cocking it the trigger guard felt like it moved a bit so I got out my trusty Brownells SAA screwdriver set and checked and sure enough, the three screws securing the trigger guard to the frame were a little loose (maybe 1/4 turn). I snugged them up and the gun feels tight again but it got me to wondering, is this normal or should I have the gun looked at in more detail? Or just check the screws periodically to make sure they are snug? The hammer screw was also a little loose and the screws securing the back strap to the frame were also a little loose. I didn't over-tighten them but just carefully snugged them all up.
These screws may have been a bit loose to begin with. Or they weren't torqued up enough, and the shooting just jarred them "looser" (if that is a valid word). I cannot give you the factory-intended inch-pounds of torque for these various screws (if such exists). So next time you shoot this Colt SAA, check the screws before and after -- and learn from experience. I think too that the jarring that a Colt SAA experiences during the firing of normal loads will eventually loosen many of its screws in due time.

I can highly recommend Brownell's single-piece hollow ground screwdrivers. However, I like to round the screwdriver corners on a wetstone. This reduces the possibility of damaging the surrounding screw holes (wearing away blue or nickel), while leaving the bottom edges of the screwdriver blades sharp for proper engagement at the bottom of the screw slots. The first time you might gently slip out of a screw slot, this rounding will become greatly appreciated! No one taught me this little rounding modification, but one learns by experience how to do things better.
 

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SDRider,

Remove the oils from the screws, use a little Clear Nail Polish on the screw threads............Choosing the wrong Loc-Tite can be troublesome and expensive.

If you want to use a Loc-Tite product, choose Loc-Tite Thread locker #222

Tom
 

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The first thing I did when I received my new SAA was check the screws. One of the TG screws was inexcusably loose right from the factory. I agree, blue Loctite is the way to go. I use it on my Vaqueros and Colt clones, too.
 

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I don't use anything on my USFA single actions. And, I don't "torque them down". After each range trip and cleaning I tighten them with an appropriately fitting screw driver (I'm using a couple Grace drivers right now). They don't loosen in the safe so they're good for the next shooting session, after which I will come home, clean them, and tighten the screws. The screw tightening has become part of the cleaning process.
Dave
 

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Long time ago I figured out that when my SAA started shooting erratically it was due to loose screws. While I'm a fan of the "right" loctite, it can make it a little harder to remove the screws for maintenance - thus increasing the chance of buggering the screw head. Now I just snug them done after every cleaning.
 

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I started using purple loctite some 5 years back. Unless you're shooting hot loads, it works great. No problems with disassembly. Clean the screws and holes with a good cleaner such as Gun Scrubber or brake cleaner. I usually apply one drop to the screw threads and blot the excess with a cleaning patch. I have had no problems with screws coming loose or with having to use excessive force to disassemble. Threadlockers are usually stocked at most auto parts stores.

That said, if you choose not to use a threadlocker, check the screws after a range session.
 
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