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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
A person I know has a first generation Colt percussion revolver. He isn't long for this world, and what is most likely to happen is that his relatives will decide to sell it. None of them know about selling such an antiquity. I know a little more, but not much. What do you recommend? These are average people, who aren't going to travel, nor pay anyone to sell it. Where do they stand the best chance?

BTW, I haven't seen it, so am unsure if it is so mint condition they will need to call Christies, or if it will sit on Gun Broker for years.
 

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First, you must get the gun examined by someone who is familiar with antique guns. This person will have to determine what condition the gun is, as well as what model Colt it is. Then, I would surf the various gun auctions on the internet to see what the asking price of similar guns in the same condition is.
Then, I would advertise the gun for slightly less, maybe a couple of hundred dollars, than similar guns. If you make the gun a bargain, but not "give it away", you will have no problem selling it in a timely fashion.....and you will get more for it than selling it at a local gun show. Dealers and people at gun shows tend to to buy at wholesale and sell at retail. The internet auctions are usually priced at retail.
 

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Good advice from Steg. I'd add that, once you've figured out what you've got and a price for it, you take some GOOD pictures of the gun and post them and a full description in the For Sale section of this Forum. The folks here would likely be interested in it and they are good people to deal with. A plus: since it's a black powder gun, shipping will not be a hassle for you or the buyer.
 

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That was very well said!

First, you must get the gun examined by someone who is familiar with antique guns. This person will have to determine what condition the gun is, as well as what model Colt it is. Then, I would surf the various gun auctions on the internet to see what the asking price of similar guns in the same condition is.
Then, I would advertise the gun for slightly less, maybe a couple of hundred dollars, than similar guns. If you make the gun a bargain, but not "give it away", you will have no problem selling it in a timely fashion.....and you will get more for it than selling it at a local gun show. Dealers and people at gun shows tend to to buy at wholesale and sell at retail. The internet auctions are usually priced at retail.
 

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Steg nailed it
+1.

Additionally, it may be worth noting that you have, here, some of the most knowledgeable Colt people anywhere. They can accurately assess the arm and it's approximate worth.

That leads me to another very important point - photos. Whoever is in charge of selling the firearm needs, not only, to truthfully describe the gun to the fullest extent of their knowledge but to take many clear, sharp, photos and some close-ups of any problematic areas that may be described in the ad content.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Few years back, I got a gently used Nikon 105mm lens, off Ebay. A friend who makes a living as a photographer recommended it to me. The photos it takes are unbelievable. They're like looking through a wormhole in space at something actually there. Investing in that lens has paid off, as Im sure it has made the diffeence between not selling something on Ebay, and selling the item. Heck, sometimes the item I post for sale doesn't look nearly as good as that lens can make it look.

Nikon 105mm, f/2.8. About $900 new, but I got a used one for $380. Wedding phtographers use 'em, and also, it allows for "macro" shots, meaning up close and 1:1 ratio.

BTW, I've been looking for alternatives to Ebay and its fees. One, "Ealtbay" allows ads for stuff prohibited on Ebay. I assume they mean gun accessories, especially. One site with NO fees is Bluejay.com.
I haven't sold anything yet, but gonna give 'em a try. Oh, yeah, if I sell my second generation, I'll give you guys first dibs. If my friend's family sells his first generation, I'll mention this forum to them.

Thanks
 

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First, you can't list a firearm of any kind for sale on e-bay. If you do, they will not only pull your ad, but they could penalize you. You could be banned from their site for a while.
If you want to sell a firearm on line, I suggest listing it, along with appropriate photos on gunbroker or gunsamerica. Both sites attract more gun buyers than any of the others, and their fees are reasonable.
 

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First, you must get the gun examined by someone who is familiar with antique guns. This person will have to determine what condition the gun is, as well as what model Colt it is. Then, I would surf the various gun auctions on the internet to see what the asking price of similar guns in the same condition is.
Then, I would advertise the gun for slightly less, maybe a couple of hundred dollars, than similar guns. If you make the gun a bargain, but not "give it away", you will have no problem selling it in a timely fashion.....and you will get more for it than selling it at a local gun show. Dealers and people at gun shows tend to to buy at wholesale and sell at retail. The internet auctions are usually priced at retail.
Steg,

I wish to comment that you are amongst the most knowledgeable on this forum and I enjoy reading your posts, and your responses to my posts immensely.

However, with regards to the above post, what gun shows are you aware of in which you can purchase at wholesale? In my experience, 50% + of the items at gun shows are priced at full Blue Book retail, or above. Maybe 40% + is 'fair', and the remaining 'well under 10%', and usually sometimes substantially so, is what one needs to be looking for at a gun show. In my experience, the only items I have purchased at a gun show are those of elderly long-time collectors who has Colts, or other collectible early firearms, that they wish to sell at a fair or low-fair price due to advanced age. The neat thing about this stuff is that it has usually not seen the light of day in years and is not 'Turnbellized'.

Internet: I avoid these sort of purchases due to the full retail nature of it all and the strong possibility of being disappointed!

In my experience, I have gotten great deals at local auctions in which one goes to the auction with an open mind, and not necessarily for the Winchester 1886 or Colt SAA that you have to have! Find some neat firearms and set a price you will not go higher than, and if you get it, that's great!

Not to say I would not go to a national auction (Rock Island, James Julia, etc.), to get a once-in-a-lifetime firearm, like a Colt Walker, but I would be doing this with the realization that I am buying this for personal satisfaction and not necessarily getting a bargain. I may do this some day...and look forward to it...but economics would be a small part of the equation.

Here is a Hand Ejector First Model .22 Ladysmith I got at a local auction for $275 in March:



It is probably worth $900 to $1100 as others suggested on the Smith & Wesson forum. Now, I never intended originally to purchase this firearm, but the price was right and it is a neat little gun, especially since never having personally seen or handled one until that time.

Of course, such opportunities may be rare, and you may be limited to such opportunities once or twice a year, or less.

Another great source, again, with limited choices, are the swap tables at the local gun show, and the monthly meeting. And word of mouth...

Of course, if you are open to only a few select Colts, choices are fewer and so forth.

Before I rambled on...I guess my original intent was to state that my experiences at gun shows are mostly of the educational and inspirational sort and not of the 'finding bargains at wholesale' sort. Comments? Am I missing something?
 

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I'm sorry if I did not make myself clear, vis-a-vie wholesale at gun shows. If you are selling a firearm at a gunshow to a dealer or someone with a table, you will only receive a wholesale price at best. If you are purchasing, you will pay full retail unless you are good at dickering. The only time an individual can get a better price than wholesale at a gun show when selling, is when you sell your gun to an individual in a private sale. Then, you can get something between wholesale and retail-depending on how well you can dicker.
There are, of course many wholesale deals at gun shows, but they are usually only between dealers.
Of course, as we all know, there are those who always do not want to pay much for any gun, yet when they sell one, try to squeeze every last cent for it; thinking each and every gun they have is the holy grail or right next to it. They rarely if ever buy from a dealer and do not think well of those who do. I guess that holds true for any collecting hobby!
 

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Ahaa...I was somewhat confused. I was referring to myself, as a nobody John Q Public, going into a gun show with the intent to buy something. Generally, in my experience, most of the stuff at gun shows is so over the top over retail, that dickering might get you something at slightly under retail. I confused myself as one of the people fortunate to buy at wholesale and sell at retail, without a table. You meant, instead, a dealer, or other similar individual, who would buy from me, John Q Public at wholesale, and later re-sell at retail. Again, the only realistically priced (and not messed-with) stuff tends to come from a motivated elderly seller who has intended to sell his long-time holdings.
 
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