Colt Forum banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,641 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
CSA Fayetteville Rifle, type II, 1862. A shootable original is above my pay grade, so I had a modern copy made.

100_0378_zps00e7022b.jpg

100_0379_zpsfa5a925d.jpg

100_0380_zps9df66e9e.jpg

100_0381_zpsf85680c7.jpg

April, 1861 Federal soldiers guarding the arsenal at Harper's Ferry found themselves out numbered by Virginia Militia and set fire to the buildings comprising the arsenal. Confederate forces seized the arsenal and hauled away anything of value, machines, stock, and any arms found. It was decided the machines to make rifle muskets of the 1855 pattern would go to Richmond and the machinery and stock to make Pattern 1855 rifles would go to Fayetteville North Carolina where some 9,000 rifles would ultimately be manufactured for the Confederate States of America.

The earliest of these rifles used parts captured from Harper's Ferry with a mix of newly made parts at Fayetteville. Some of these rifles had the Maynard tape prime system in tact, others simply used the high hump lock plate with no effort to mill the primer system in. All barrels were uniform, using a 1:72 twist, 33 inches long, secured by two barrel bands, a three leaf rear sight, barley corn front sight, marked with an eagle head-VP and date of manufacture, exactly like the U.S. 1855 rifles, some later examples omitted the lug for the saber bayonet. Stocks remained uniform throughout production except very early rifles which were cut for patch box. The cartouche of James Burton appears opposite the lock plate on the left side of the stock, some examples have C.S. or C.S.A. stamped on the tang of the but plate.

The lock is what really separates the various models, type I will have a lock made at Harper's Ferry, or a high hump solid plate with a "C" type hammer with the year of manufacture and either U.S. or CSA below an eagle, (stamped on the door of captured locks). Type II will have a low hump solid plate with a "C" type hammer and CSA below an eagle with 1862 on the tail behind the hammer. Type III is a transitional arm with a no hump lock plate, usually dated 1863, and either a "C" type hammer or a distinctive "S" shape retaining the lug for a saber bayonet. The most common, the type IV will have the "S" type dated 1864 or 1865, hammer and no lug for bayonet, a socket bayonet was adapted to these arms.

A fellow in Virginia made the rifle for me using a few original parts such as lock innards, screws, and trigger. The barrel is of modern steel made by Whitacre of VA 1:72 twist like the originals, sights of the late U.S. 1855 rifle type, VP and eagle head with the date, 1862 on the breech and browned as an early example. Stocked in straight grain walnut interchangeable with an original 1855 U.S. rifle or Fayetteville, cartouched with James Burton's initials like an original. Brass but plate, trigger guard, barrel bands, and nose cap as per original. The only difference in the stock is it's not cut for a rammer spoon to retain the rod. Early low hump lock plate color cased with a spread eagle over CSA-Fayetteville and 1862 on the tail. The lack of a rammer spoon and the paten breech barrel give the rifle away as a modern copy...a modern shooting copy. When my eyes were younger, it would put Lyman Old style minies almost on top of another from a bench rest at 100yds. using 55gr. FFFg holy black powder. An awesome skirmishing rifle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,851 Posts
The title of your post got my attention really fast! I am a born and bred Southerner along with all my families from both sides, so you understand. I have always wanted an original Confederate rifle, but the cost was too much. I do own an English Enfield rifle that my GGGrandfather brought home sometime during the early part of the war when he was stationed near the Poccatallgo (spelling?) River near Beuafort, SC in 1862. He was in the 4th SC Cavalry and his Company was guarding the land area from the Union Gunboats coming up the river to harrass the civilian towns. The rifle has his initials cut in the stock... "J P", for John Perritt.

Not Southern Made, but Confederate used!

Picture.jpg Picture 004.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,353 Posts
My family was all Confederate too. When my dad was a little boy, he went to family reunions in SC, where the great aunts would tell stories about the family who fought. My dad was very interested, and one aunt took him up to a closet in the family home, opened the door, and said, you can take anything you want. He said it was full of rifles, swords, uniforms, flags...all carefully kept since the Civil War. He was about to select something, when his mom appeared, and said she wouldn't allow it. When she left the room, the aunt handed dad a medical journal, and said, "here, your mom won't notice this". That's about all we have, except a part of a Yankee bayonet that he was allowed to pull out of the door sill, where it had been stuck since the war, when they tried to pry open the door, during Sherman's March to The Sea. We have that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,851 Posts
azshot,

In addition to the Enfield Rifle, I also have his Sword, a Whitney .36 cal. Revolver, and a cut down US 72 cal. Musket that he used as a shotgun. I also have a button from his uniform. During the last days of the war, the 4th SC Cavalry was transfered back to SC to hold back Sherman as long as possible, but were continually backing up his advance. He was in the Greensboro, NC area when Lee surrenderd his command. All troops were to gather near Greensboro to turn over all their arms and take the Pledge of Alligence to the US. Well, the 4th SC Cavalry at that time consisted of only 12 men from the oroginal number of 120 men. They burned all their records in the with the wagon and Col Butler told the men to go home without surrendering. It took them about 1 to 1 1/2 weeks to get back to home in Pickens, SC. My GGGrandfather had all his personal equipment and arms. They traveled mostly at night to avoid Union troops. When he arrived he was almost to the point of starving and had to be helped into his home. Fortunantly his 1600 acre Plantation was still intact and operating.

I don't know, but he kept all his personall items and when he passed away, they went to his son. When he passed, they went to the grandson who gave them to my dad before he passed away in the early 1960s. I have ahd them since my dad passed away on the mid-1970s. I cherish all these items and they will go to my son at some point in time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,641 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Abwher, that's a fantastic treasure you have there! The Enfield became the official service arm of the Confederacy late in the war. I bet the story of how it was retained would be interesting in itself! Being close to the battlefields in PA, MD, and VA gives me a chance to explore and sometimes come across guns and articles with stories to tell. One, an 1864 Springfield with a rotted stock and muzzle from where it rested in an old stone spring house along Lee's retreat to Appomattox was likely left there by a Southern soldier who probably made good his escape from the war. That riflemusket could have entered Confederate service from any number of battles fought from Grant's Overland Campaign of 1864-1865.

Make no mistake, the long arms produced at Richmond and Fayetteville were said to be of equal quality to any Springfield in service during the war. A N.J. 1st sgt. picked up a Richmond riflemusket at Gettysburg proclaiming it as good a gun as a Springfield and put it to use against it's former owners the rest of the war. Also it wasn't all that unusual for Southern cavalry regiments to carry full length riflemuskets. In Earl J. Coates book on Civil War Small Arms, two Southern cavalry regiments were issued long Enfields, 2nd N.C. Cav. and the 11th. VA Cav. I don't see the 4th. S.C. Cav. listed at all, (not unusual, as Southern records are often nonexistent or incomplete at best) but I have no doubt your Enfield did see cavalry service with the 4th. S.C.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,851 Posts
Abwher, that's a fantastic treasure you have there! The Enfield became the official service arm of the Confederacy late in the war. I bet the story of how it was retained would be interesting in itself! Being close to the battlefields in PA, MD, and VA gives me a chance to explore and sometimes come across guns and articles with stories to tell. One, an 1864 Springfield with a rotted stock and muzzle from where it rested in an old stone spring house along Lee's retreat to Appomattox was likely left there by a Southern soldier who probably made good his escape from the war. That riflemusket could have entered Confederate service from any number of battles fought from Grant's Overland Campaign of 1864-1865.

Make no mistake, the long arms produced at Richmond and Fayetteville were said to be of equal quality to any Springfield in service during the war. A N.J. 1st sgt. picked up a Richmond riflemusket at Gettysburg proclaiming it as good a gun as a Springfield and put it to use against it's former owners the rest of the war. Also it wasn't all that unusual for Southern cavalry regiments to carry full length riflemuskets. In Earl J. Coates book on Civil War Small Arms, two Southern cavalry regiments were issued long Enfields, 2nd N.C. Cav. and the 11th. VA Cav. I don't see the 4th. S.C. Cav. listed at all, (not unusual, as Southern records are often nonexistent or incomplete at best) but I have no doubt your Enfield did see cavalry service with the 4th. S.C.
Many of the Confederate Cavalry units did us the regular rifles and they fought as dismounted Cavalry. From what I have read of the 4th SC Cavalry, they were doing this in SC until they were transferred to the Army of Northern Viginia under the Command of Gen Wade Hampton. During my GGGrandfather tenure with the 4th in SC, he was always on extended patrols loking for any deserters and run away slaves. During this time, he was near home and would go there to check out how things were going. This information came to me from my 4th cousin who is an author of a number of books on the family and area during thos times. Matter of fact, in a book that was published about 7 years ago, there are pictures of his rifles, revolver, sword, buttong from jacket and Confederate Money. Here is a photo when he joined Confederate Services.

John P. Perritt.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,353 Posts
Abwehr, it's good to keep the memories alive. Many in the South suffered for 100 years after the war was lost. My Ggggreat-grandfather was Gen Paul Quattlebaum, who fought to protect Colombia from the Yankees. His plantation home was singled out by a squad of Yankees to also be burned, and the women were marched out into the yard, while the soldiers threw torches onto the mattresses. But they ignored the blacks. When they got distracted (one story was a group of Confederates was arriving to defend the home), the blacks threw the burning mattresses out of the windows, saving the house. It was still there in the 1970s, and I visited it once.

The Quattlebaums also made rifles, and my dad and my life's dream had been to own one, or at least hold one! I'm told by my dad there used to be one at the Capital (Colombia) on display. I'm sure those days are over.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,641 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
azshot, what pattern, or mark was on the rifles? Maybe I can get you a photo of one at least.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,353 Posts
Hi Krag, unfortunately I've never seen one, in books or the internet. I've been asking gun experts since I was young...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,641 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The state marker does say there were rifles made there under the Confederacy presumably for the Confederate Army. There were many makers of arms in the South, from Texas to Virginia. The number of arms a maker turned out is sometimes under 100, Richmond being the largest both in new production and modification of existing arms, (carbines both new made and made from damaged riflemuskets). Both sides modified older arms for the conflict, either by private arms makers, or Gov't armories, Athens, GA. was such an armory, Palmetto in S.C. both made arms and modified them. Cook and Brother made Enfield pattern arms both in LA. and GA. privately and under Gov't control.

First I'll take the sign literally and look for rifles made there, if none found, it could be possible that since it was a saw mill, stock blanks only could have been produced there to be used elsewhere. I once came into some parts from an 1816 musket. Not worth much I thought, barrel bands, trigger guard, lock plate, but plate, and some screws. Turned out they were marked to a Confederate arsenal at Athens GA. I got a good price for rusty junk!..about four times what I thought it was worth. A little more digging through dusty old books and we may find an answer, and maybe a picture. If not, we'll look at a map and see if there was a manufacturer or arsenal near bye that may have used stock blanks cut at the mill.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,641 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Here is another "Hurrah for Dixie"........my Griswold & Gunnison revolver made in Georgia. This is an unfortunante revolver as I bought it from a Union Soldiers family. I have assumed that he captured this revolver from some Confederate Soldier.

View attachment 453209
You can bet he didn't get it handed to him willingly. That's one of my favorite Confederate revolvers, the stories it could tell...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,641 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Well, this Thread has gotten me going, LOL! In an earlier post, I showed the Enfield Rifle my GGGrandfather brought home early in the war and mentioned the cutdown musket he was using as a shotgun at the end of the war. Here is the Cut Down Musket.

View attachment 453225
I've seen a few like that before, damaged smoothbore muskets cut down for cavalry use. Yours is missing the sling swivel which was usually turned around backwards by mounting the entire trigger guard backwards providing a handy attachment for a cavalry sling.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,851 Posts
krag96,

Yes, I was aware it was missing and thought about finding an original, but I decided to leave it as-is. When He came home, it may have been there and he removed to use a shotgun on the Plantation????? He was not a rich man, but was very well off so he probably bought a shotgun for hunting, LOL!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,641 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I tried an original U.S. 1842 musket as a shotgun once, to say I was unimpressed is a mild understatement. Buck and ball on the other hand makes those old muskets a fearsome weapon! So nasty in fact, I load modern 12ga. shells with it in case the need to get real mean and nasty should arise.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,167 Posts
Well, this Thread has gotten me going, LOL! In an earlier post, I showed the Enfield Rifle my GGGrandfather brought home early in the war and mentioned the cutdown musket he was using as a shotgun at the end of the war. Here is the Cut Down Musket.


View attachment 453225
What an incredible treasure. I am so happy that it stayed in your family.
Merry Christmas to you and your family Abwehr.
 
  • Like
Reactions: ei8ht

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,411 Posts
The Quattlebaums also made rifles, and my dad and my life's dream had been to own one, or at least hold one! I'm told by my dad there used to be one at the Capital (Colombia) on display. I'm sure those days are over.
azshot,

This is a picture of a Quattlebaum flintlock in the Lexington County, SC museum. There is supposedly a later caplock gun in the Confederate Relic Room at the SC State Museum in Columbia. I haven't seen it, but I'll look for it the next time I go to Columbia.

Quattlebaum Rifle.jpg













Best Regards,

Buck
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top