Colt Forum banner

1 - 20 of 49 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
481 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
62484611_2187646044638569_7406494321098096640_n.jpg I rarely ever shoot Cap and Ball anymore and my 40+ year old 1851 Navy just sits in my safe. But yesterday I got a sales email from Cimarron offering a Texas Ranger edition 1847 Walker with all the stampings and markings the originals came with. I caved in and ordered one for the sale price of $700.83 without the presentation box (another $300+) and will get it soon. I should have gotten another Winchester...but I decided I needed this one.


https://www.facebook.com/search/top/?q=cimarron firearms company&epa=SEARCH_BOX


https://www.cimarron-firearms.com/walker-s-walker-1847.html?fbclid=IwAR2j6AFtuOcj8BvFvAWMRGr2Oyi58viWUBiXSF092pD8qFUPZs4RLK1Oatc
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,145 Posts
Be sure to get a good horse and saddle holster that can carry it for you whenever you want to use it. It wasn't referred to as a "horse pistol" without reason.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
481 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Going to make a holster for it, since they were carried across the saddles first, this is going to be fun. No one even thought about gun belts until this one came along since everyone just stuck the single shot pistols in the waist belts. There were no sixguns or fancy holsters commonly used during the 1830's-40's or early 50's in all likelihood. So Cimarron asked me to send the photos of a completed Texas Holster when I get it done. This is going to be a hoot. I will even carry it a time or two. I typically get many requests for photos from tourists or locals from around the world who stop by at the Starbucks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,141 Posts
I have seen the ads and gotten an email or two but have resisted temptation...so far.
If someone would buy that New Frontier in the WTS section...I might make a run to Texas Jack's ;)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
165 Posts
Cimmaron says they will be marked "as exact as possible" like the originals, but specifically mention only the company/serial numbers. Does anyone know if these have the Colt barrel address and Colt's Patent cylinder markings?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,604 Posts
Some might say other wise, but shoot a full load of the holy black in that hand canon (and not have it chain fire :eek:) and you'll know nothing as stumpy as a Walker until the 44 Mag showed up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,847 Posts
Be sure to get a good horse and saddle holster that can carry it for you whenever you want to use it. It wasn't referred to as a "horse pistol" without reason.
I've gone through a typical urban Day CCW-ing mine 'Mexican' style...

Long as I had it pointing somewhat to the side, was easy to sit, drive, tie a Shoe, stand in line at the Grocery Store, whatever...did not try running any 50 yard dashes though...Lol...

And I am not a big guy, 5' 11", 145 soaking wet...

Never felt uncomfortable one bit...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
481 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Back in the day (early 80's) I had a Uberti 1847 Walker and loaded 60grs of 3F all the time. I used to shoot it through vehicles and appliances to marvel about it's power and penetration. It was very powerful for a BP revolver. I hope to have as much fun again using conical bullets.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
507 Posts
This is one of the very few old daguerreotypes that appears to be of an unidentified man with a holstered Walker. The first time I saw this--with those outfits and hats, my initial thought was that these two leprechauns were gunnin' for the guy who either stole their "Lucky Charms" or pot-o-gold!




Cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,460 Posts
No doubt, a very fine revolver as the rest of the bunch has said. I had a Walker back in the 70's and a Dragoon in the 90's. These days I'll settle for a Navy Model, toti'n them horse pistols around without a horse is just no fun anymore.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,036 Posts
They will have the Cimarron markings from what I’ve been able to glean. Colt apparently got a bad taste in their mouth from the marketing agreement with the 3rd Generation black powder series.
 

·
*** ColtForum MVP ***
Joined
·
14,611 Posts
Depending on what ballistics you use, the Colt Walker was the most powerful revolver in the world until the invention of the .357 Magnum or the .44 Magnum.

On the Colt Fever site I wrote some information from a letter Captain Walker sent to Sam Colt just before he was killed, in which he said that the Walker was as effective as a rifle or musket at various ranges.

The Colt Legend

My all time favorite was the Colt 3rd Model Dragoon.
I had a Second Issue but as usual, stupidly sold it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
OP, I can easily see why you got that "Walker" While not a black powder guy. I'd have me two tons of fun with that thing. Well done!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,847 Posts
Depending on what ballistics you use, the Colt Walker was the most powerful revolver in the world until the invention of the .357 Magnum or the .44 Magnum.

On the Colt Fever site I wrote some information from a letter Captain Walker sent to Sam Colt just before he was killed, in which he said that the Walker was as effective as a rifle or musket at various ranges.

The Colt Legend

My all time favorite was the Colt 3rd Model Dragoon.
I had a Second Issue but as usual, stupidly sold it.
I've never understood why they stayed with Lead Balls...

Use a 220 Grain DEWC, or similar weight stubby RNFP, it will easily Load and fit in for normal Loading, hardly takes any more room in the Chamber than a Ball, and your FPS and also Ft Lbs of impact go way up.

All the comparisons for "power" of the Walker are always done with round Ball...which was the least powerful option then or since.

.454 Lead Ball weighs about 140 Grains.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,158 Posts
I've never understood why they stayed with Lead Balls...

Use a 220 Grain DEWC, or similar weight stubby RNFP, it will easily Load and fit in for normal Loading, hardly takes any more room in the Chamber than a Ball, and your FPS and also Ft Lbs of impact go way up.

All the comparisons for "power" of the Walker are always done with round Ball...which was the least powerful option then or since.

.454 Lead Ball weighs about 140 Grains.
Contrary to popular belief, these revolvers were usually shot with pointed bullets. The issues bullets were 'Picket bullets', essentially a long cone. They had a very short bearing surface that made loading them straight a little troublesome.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
507 Posts
Contrary to popular belief, these revolvers were usually shot with pointed bullets. The issues bullets were 'Picket bullets', essentially a long cone. They had a very short bearing surface that made loading them straight a little troublesome.
Correct, and I have read also that due to lack of proper instruction, many of the soldiers not only over loaded the chambers, but also loaded the "picket" style projectiles in backward. This combination along with the weak metallurgy of the iron cylinders resulted in a lot of ruptured chambers and disabled guns. Preventing such overloads is one of the reasons that the subsequent Dragoons manufactured by Colt had shorter cylinders and frames.






Cheers
 
1 - 20 of 49 Posts
Top