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This was my Uncle’s gun, he was a great man. I feel very fortunate to have it now. From my research it has a Remington UMC slide, a Colt frame s.n. 225xxx, and a Springfield barrel. Any ideas on the year? Should I shoot it, and if so what round do you recommend?

708276
 

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Congrats on your inheritance sorry about your uncle. Yep no problem to shoot her!
Probably 1918 year

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Original pistol shipped February 5, 1918. Has a few 1911A1 parts like the grip safety, mainspring housing, and stocks. When the Model 1911 went through rebuild as many 1911 small parts were used as possible to save the 1911A1 parts for the 1911A1 pistols also going through rebuild
 

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Original pistol shipped February 5, 1918. Has a few 1911A1 parts like the grip safety, mainspring housing, and stocks. When the Model 1911 went through rebuild as many 1911 small parts were used as possible to save the 1911A1 parts for the 1911A1 pistols also going through rebuild
 

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I wouldn't shoot anything hotter than the standard 230 grain load suggested above. I don't shoot those any more, and shoot my own 185 and 200 grain target velocity rounds.
 

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Odds are it is perfectly safe to shoot but having it checked out by a good gunsmith might be a good idea.
Like others have said, a standard 230 grain hardball load is what it was made for. If you have never fired them, I think you will find them plenty powerful enough.
 

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Service pistols of that time have a 'softer' metallurgy than those of WWII - the frame 'will' take more of a beating, so change out the springs, and for good measure - try JohnnyP's loads to extend the service life.
 
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