Colt Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,465 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If my reference books are correct, this is a '28 vintage gun (Ser.# 351690). All numbers match except the stocks which are from 1927 ( # 350947). A previous owner scratched his initials and name on the inside of the grip panels. as shown in the pics. He also stamped his initials on the grip frame.

Any one ever heard of or have any history on J.M.Barnes??

I've requested a Colt letter.

According to the staff at the Cabelas, this one has been in their inventory with no takers since they opened this location in 2015. It was sent from a Cabelas in Boise Idaho as part of a shipment to initially stock their "gun library". It started out at $5000+! After years of price reductions, and some fairly intensive recent haggling, I got it for less than their cost at $2979 plus tax.

Best,
Charles
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,299 Posts
It would be nice to know the history's of all the old guns that passed through our hands. I once owned a Colt New Frontier serial # 5355 NF. I bought it from a pawn shop in Receda Calif. It looked unfired but no box. Paid the going sum of $250 in about 1974. It was a 5 1/2" .45 Colt. I shot it a little. Then I bought George Garton`s book, "Post War Colt SAA`s". A identical one was in the book. Said it had been one of a consecutively numbered pair Murphy had bought in 1965. I dug mine out of the safe and it was numbered with it! Called up Garton and he confirmed mine was the other gun! He owned the one in the book that he had bought off one of Murphy's sons. Wanted to buy mine but I wasn't interested in selling. I got a Colt letter that said it was one of a consecutively numbered pair sent to Wolfram Leather Co. in Monrovia Calif. Garton said he thought that gun would show up if he put his in his book. He had the son notarize his dad had owned his. Evidently the other son took his to the pawn shop and didn't bother to tell them who he was or that it had been his famous fathers gun. This is all good. The bad part is it along with many more guns I had disappeared when I got divorced. I did get my ex to sign a statement that if any of the guns ever showed up they were to be considered mine. She didn't want to sign but I refused to settle until she did. None ever showed up. All were nice old western types. Another beat SAA, a 1877 Lighting with pearl grips that looked next to new, a 1878 DAA 7 1/2" 45 colt about 90%, a nickle 4" DA S&W Russian that was in fine shape, a Remington Derringer, and a nice Luger with holster that my uncle brought back. I still get sick and mad thinking about it all again. Every collector poo poo`s every story about famous guns unless they have factory letters etc, but from experience I believe many of us have had famous guns pass through our hands and never knew it. I have told my story here of the Murphy gun many times. I think it likely someone on this site owns it. I keep hoping they would get in touch with me so I can make a offer to buy it back. By me writing this they would be afraid to sell or show it publicly. No, they didn't steal it nor any of the other missing guns. My ex did. She denied taking them to the detective yet only her and I had the combo to the safe. I owned them all before we met. At the time the detective got the case our divorce wasn't final. The detective told me, [Look. We both know she took them. Since your divorce isn't final they could be considered hers. I have to take them off the hot sheet. If I arrest someone with any of them, they will own my house and yours!] She couldn't reverse her story at that point so I got the statement that she hated to sign. I could have then listed them hot again BUT DID`NT. By then I cooled off some and never did for the sole sake of our young daughter at the time. I just would like a crack at buying it or one of the others back.
Anyway there probably are as many story's similar to this as there are most old guns out there.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,794 Posts
More pics.......
It has always been one of my "pet peeves", to see a beautiful gun, camera, guitar, etc... that some idiot has scratched their name, or Social Security number, or other identifying information on! And yes...I know that if they own the item, it is their perfect right to do so, but that doesn't make it any less dumb in my opinion...and especially if the "scratching" looks like it was done by a "third grader"!

By the way, I notice that you collect Colts that are marked with various law enforcement agencies identification. I don't know if you noticed it or not, but there was a Detective Special (I think) that was marked as once belonging to the 'D.C.' Police on here! Just thought I'd pass that along to you in case you were looking for one! :eek:

nowinca
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,299 Posts
On that derringer that I posted above on: Very faintly it looked to me that "Bass" was scratched on it. Sam Bass?? Anyway it`s gone. I had a close friend that found under the pad of a old shotgun he bought a license from I think, Oklahoma right after it became a state or so.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,465 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
It has always been one of my "pet peeves", to see a beautiful gun, camera, guitar, etc... that some idiot has scratched their name, or Social Security number, or other identifying information on! And yes...I know that if they own the item, it is their perfect right to do so, but that doesn't make it any less dumb in my opinion...and especially if the "scratching" looks like it was done by a "third grader"!


nowinca
Prior to computerized databases that documented serial numbers etc. of stolen guns for law enforcement, marking your guns like this was the accepted ironclad proof of ownership if your gun was stolen and found in the thief's possession.

Best,
Charles
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,666 Posts
I don't think the owners of these early guns were too interested in 21st century collectors when they marked their guns. :)
For 19th century owners maybe some of them on the frontier didn't have much better education than today's third graders. Besides which, trying to scratch your name with a pin or sharp object doesn't lend itself to neatness. Just my 2c. worth.

Rio
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,794 Posts
I don't think the owners of these early guns were too interested in 21st century collectors when they marked their guns. :)
For 19th century owners maybe some of them on the frontier didn't have much better education than today's third graders. Besides which, trying to scratch your name with a pin or sharp object doesn't lend itself to neatness. Just my 2c. worth.

Rio
Yep...I rest my case! Actually, those times weren't conducive to the learning of anything, other than the necessities of life, but more just the mere survival of the times! My reference to the intelligence of people scratching their information on guns, etc. was more referring to modern times, than frontier times, and as far as I am aware, some police departments, evidence rooms, etc. continue this practice, which is even more stupid, when you consider that "technically", the guns in question are the property of the Courts jurisdiction, (after an arrest has been made), and not the police! I have personally observed this situation occurring, and in this day and age, and NOT on guns from frontier times, but guns that have been "held" as "evidence" as late as just several years ago!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
741 Posts
... some police departments, evidence rooms, etc. continue this practice...(after an arrest has been made)...
Among the various little tricks used on the witness stand to answer smug defense lawyers, like:

"Did you inform my client of his rights?" "Yes, I read them to him verbatim off this card."

"Are you certain this is the gun my client was holding?' "Yes, I scratched my initials in it right here when I took it from him."

...and despite auto correct, those "typos" in the transcript of your statement often coincide with key elements. The cop's notorious "bad spelling"is often a way to get you to "initial" the document to show that you had to read through ALL of it before you signed it.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,794 Posts
Yep...I rest my case! Actually, those times weren't conducive to the learning of anything, other than the necessities of life, but more just the mere survival of the times! My reference to the intelligence of people scratching their information on guns, etc. was more referring to modern times, than frontier times, and as far as I am aware, some police departments, evidence rooms, etc. continue this practice, which is even more stupid, when you consider that "technically", the guns in question are the property of the Courts jurisdiction, (after an arrest has been made), and not the police! I have personally observed this situation occurring, and in this day and age, and NOT on guns from frontier times, but guns that have been "held" as "evidence" as late as just several years ago!
Found this article after my post having to do with the "scratching" of information on guns, other I.D. etc. and it is an excellent example of my point, and even identifies ONE police agency that is doing this, and I can verify at least another PD here in California that continues this practice.

I don't think this is anyway of treating our military combat veterans, when they return home after serving in the various hellholes of the middle east, including Afghanistan and Iraq, etc.

Click on link: https://www.washingtontimes.com/blog/guns/2012/jun/17/miller-dc-police-damage-soldiers-guns/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,803 Posts
I remember growing up, the local PD encouraged people to put their DL# or SS# on anything of value...especially electronics and guns. They even loaned out electric pencils to make it easier. Somewhere around here I still have a carbide-tipped pen the homeowners insurance folks sent out as a freebie.
I saw lots of handguns, rifles and shotguns with initials and numbers "engraved" on them.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top