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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When I got my first revolver, I would pretty much pull the trigger back as fast as I could to fire it. To test the durability of the gun (like an ignorant idiot) I would also pull the trigger back as fast as I could and as HARD as I could to test the bolt and cylinder notches. If it could catch then the gun was in good working order /forums/images/graemlins/shocked.gif /forums/images/graemlins/ooo.gif
As many of you guessed, after about a month of treating the gun in this way it started throwing by.
Since having my revolvers repair I have started being more careful....maybe a little too careful. In taking it easy on my trigger action I have let something else slip in.
Instead of pulling the trigger back as fast as I can to get the shot off, I hesitate and try to anticipate when the pull is over and stop pulling the trigger before the DA cycle is over. With a Colt revolver the stacking particularly contributes to this problem.
Either that happens or I hesitate and slow down too early or go too slow and it wobbles the sights a little.
I am trying to nail down a good smooth fingerpull that delivers smoothly but without being abusive and slow

Solutions? Thoughts? This is a psychological problem rather than a mechanical problem. The guns work fine, it's me that's the problem /forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif
 

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Um, maybe you could put some snap caps in the revolvers in question and dry fire them. Practice this until your hesitation goes away and you begin to use the trigger more smoothly. I'm not all that great with DA pull myself. With my Cobra I only keep everything in the 8 ring on a man sized target at 30 feet. But I practice the proper technique at home with the dry fire method.

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
all I can do is keep trying. If police could do it for 100 years, I can do it now. Good arm muscle buildup and development.
If I had to shoot someone as I am now, I could no doubt kill them at 25-50 yards. With careful shot in SA I could likely hit them at 100 yards.
But I want to be a marksman at 50 yards in DA.

The problem is as my finger is pulling the trigger back, it is letting off trying to avoid slamming the trigger back and while that is going on the stacking in the trigger is increasing resistance against my finger. Not a good combination. Any thoughts?
 

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I assume you meant be a marksman at 50 yards in DA not SA since you said you feel you hit someone at 100yds in SA.

You could buy one of those finger stengthing machines and shoot several thousand rounds a week. I think that would solve any problem you have. But if you're like me and can't afford to shoot that much I'd go with the practice with snap-caps route.

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You're right, I did mean DA. I edited the post.


I practice with snapcaps all the time, but somehow I can't shake the feeling that I am hurting the gun thrusting the trigger straight back.
 

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To fire a weapon is to hurt it in some small way. But heck the men who made these handguns made them to be used. So go ahead use them and don't worry about it. Other than that I'm tapped out of ideas to help. Sorry.

Dave
 
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