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My grandparents had a party line. Anyone remember them? You had to listen to hear how many times it would ring to see if it was for you. Of curse every house on the street could pick up their reciever and listen in.



My Dad taught us how to make "bombs" out of black powder as well as a Polish cannon out of soda cans and light fluid or hair spray. Then we moved on to small black powder cannons. As well as fishing with M-80 fireworks etc. Try any of that fun stuff today. Swat team would be there in an instant.

We rode in the back of a pick up truck too. Thats another big no no around here today.
I definitely remember party lines and having to go through an operator to make a call. I also remember people driving down the road in station wagons and pickup trucks with the tailgate down and kids sitting on the gate. Wonder how many got bounced out and onto the roadway before common sense took over?
 

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I didn't see this mentioned, but as a small boy one of my "assignments" was to take the bag of oleo-margarine (which had no color) and to pop the orange capsule which was in the bag with the oleo and then knead the bag until the orange color mixed with the oleo to make it look like butter. I remember how my hands would get tired from the squeezing and kneading of the bag. I also recall just about everything others have mentioned. I am 80. Very fortunate to have grown up on the 40's and 50's. Regards, keith
 

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I didn't see this mentioned, but as a small boy one of my "assignments" was to take the bag of oleo-margarine (which had no color) and to pop the orange capsule which was in the bag with the oleo and then knead the bag until the orange color mixed with the oleo to make it look like butter. I remember how my hands would get tired from the squeezing and kneading of the bag. I also recall just about everything others have mentioned. I am 80. Very fortunate to have grown up on the 40's and 50's. Regards, keith
I hated that crap,it tasted terrible,I went thru WW2 w/out butter on my toast because I couldn't stand the taste of it,luckily we still grew everything in our garden & we had a cellar full of home made jam for the toast,I still won't use margarine.
 

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Many of us learned to talk on the telephone using a rotary model. Learning to use one was fairly straightforward. I never had an issue that I can remember; however I struggle daily trying to remember how to use my flip cell phone that I've had for 16 years. I'll never live long enough to master an iPhone.

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Many of us learned to talk on the telephone using a rotary model. Learning to use one was fairly straightforward. I never had an issue that I can remember; however I struggle daily trying to remember how to use my flip cell phone that I've had for 16 years. I'll never live long enough to master an iPhone.

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I've had a cell phone for about 17 or 18 yrs. & I've never heard it ring.I keep it in the pistol pouch w/my 6" Taurus down between my bucket seat & console just in case I break down between home & town,I've had to use it 3 times & always have to figure out how to use it.When I'm out of the car in town I'm packing something a lot smaller
 

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I have a nice Waltham Crescent St. pocket watch, a 19 jewel lever set version made in 1903 that still keeps pretty good time. I'm old enough to remember party lines and a milkman delivering milk in glass bottles.

I lived right by an area that housed a POW camp in WWII and also a munitions storage facility. The ruins of those buildings made for excellent hunting grounds for lizards and ground squirrels, many who fell to a well placed shot from my Daisy Spittin' Image Model 94 Winchester replica BB gun or my Benjamin Model 342 .22 cal pellet rifle.
Today that area is all condos and a park and the cops would get called if they saw a kid with a BB gun.

My dad had one of those fountain pens with the lever on the side which was used to fill it from bottled ink. I ruined it by using it to expel "octopus ink" into the bathtub around my plastic toy frogmen. My mom couldn't figure out why there was a blue ring around the tub after I was supposed to be taking a bath.
 

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As a mid-teen in the early fifties, rats at the city dump were shot with a Rem 512 which had a clunky 6 cell taped to the barrel zeroed in the enter of the beam at 30 feet. The compact walnut icebox in the kitchen corner now serves as a file cabinet. Ditto to most all of the previous replies.
Bill
 

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I imagine there would be a SWAT roll at my former HS parking lot today if kids showed up at school w/ arms & ammo in tow like we did during hunting season. Openly carrying long guns through town walking from friends house back to mine, ‘cause it was too hard to ride a bike & not drop it.
 

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Does anyone go for a pleasure drive anymore? I guess we're too busy with other things and wanting to get where we're going in a hurry. Anyway, it was always a pleasure riding with dad, mom...not so much, seemed she was always ''late'' to something and rushed too much. Dumped me right out of the back window once going around a corner too fast then was mad at me for getting dumped out! Well, maybe if I hadn't been hanging out the window like a dog...

Speaking of transportation, hopping trains. We would some times hop a freight coming out of the yards to get to the next town, it was rare we got a similar ride back though. It was dangerous, but we were young and not so much learned in such things, (dad said he did it, so we did it, monkey see-monkey do).
 

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If you are old enough to know what an ice box was and how they were used, let along still have that word in your vocabular and use it, I bet you have used a fountain pen. Not a cartridge pen but one with the little vacuum pump and lever to fill it. Folks cleaned up to go into town. Sunday was a day off from work.

When silver dollars were still in common use. A dollar could actually buy some thing. And gold coins were hard to find, secretly hoarded and hidden away.

All that makes a 5 hr gun fight with a Colt SAA seem "casual". These days there is plastic "money", throw away writing instruments, 20 round hand guns and 30+ round rifles that weigh about as much as a loaded 7.5" Colt.

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Some folks will kill other folks with a rock given the chance. 5hr gun fights with a few casualties are likely to turn into hundreds dead or wounded easy enough.

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All that makes one kinda wish for an ice box and a good six gun to come back in style. Likely gun fights would happen less often, be a lot shorter frame and everyone would have to learn how shoot to actually hit anything.

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I recall the ice box. I also remember washing machines that included a ringer to squeeze the water out. In Texas on Sundays everything was closed except for grocery stores and pharmacies (the "Blue Law").

As a little kid, I recall being at my grandmother's house and the wooden wall phone would ring. I asked "why doesn't someone answer the phone" and was told "that's not our ring". You could pick up that phone's ear piece and sometimes hear a conversation (party line). To dial out, you picked up the ear piece and told Central thru the mouth piece "I need to talk to aunt Pearl C. in Marlin", and she would connect you.

I also recall sitting in an outhouse on a freezing windy 18 degree day, and thinking "that star cutout in the door was a bad idea"!
 

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This thread is one of those that pops up from time to time and takes us back to a simpler time.
I'm a boomer, so some things were no longer part of contemporary 1950's life, but most of the references made here are things I am familiar with. Enfiels, Springfields, & Krags at Wooloworth's, $0.39 .22 cal. short 'thrifties' at Western Auto, delivering newspapers the day after Cassius Clay knocked out Sonny Liston in the first round down at the Lewiston Armory, are all things that fit this feel-good thread. The LGS would sell the hot new Winchester if you agreed to take a Luger out of the barrel for $20.
I need to read about these common recollections. They have a kindly, relaxing effect on the sensibilities.
Great thread.
Colt Forum Forever!
HooRah!
 

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We think of the prices back then, (guns in particular) and think of what we should have bought, but we didn't make a lot of money. Dad had a good job with the Pennsylvania Rail Road and brought home about $100.00 a week, ($200.00 per pay). That would make a $20.00 Luger 1/10 of his bi-weekly pay. Still cheap enough, but not to buy in bulk like we dream of, and they were more a glut on the market than anything, nobody wanted them back then. Handguns, a Colt or S&W revolver would sell at 2-3 times the price before a surplus self loader would at $20-$25.00. The real gem of the time that I dream of was the common availability of these guns! I remember stores having racks, corner stacks, and piles of surplus rifles in new or at least very good shape. Who wanted a mint 1909 Argentine Mauser back then? Few people, very few people. A Winchester Model 70 or even a Model 94 was what people wanted, (Remingtons, Savages, and Marlins too) not some long heavy military surplus clunker no matter how cheap they were. At best the Mausers were worth their actions, but little more.

Anybody remember the 98 Mauser shotguns? Usually 16 ga. as I remember.
 

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In 1963 I went to a pawn shop in Kansas City Kan. they had a glass display case with three shelves of P-38 pistols, your choice $35.00. Of course at the time I was making about $100.00 a week so I only bought one.
 

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I still call the frig an Icebox because when I was little my parents called the frig an Icebox. We also got milk delivered with donuts. You can still watch the 3 stooges where curly is the iceman delivering a big block of ice. By the time he reaches the house after a long walk the ice block is the size of a ice cube.:) Good times back then without the BS we have every day now.
 

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Our barge system worked about every 3 weeks back then and you couldn't trust the fruit and especially the milk . I grew up on Carnation powdered milk and when Milk Man powdered stuff came along we were styling . Party lines , piece of cake . we didn't have a phone in the house until I was 15 . Try canned spinnage or how ever you spell that crap . Fruit cocktail ok , Spam I still like . Back then we lived on fish and deer . Funny ,30 years ago we were eating and my kids said, what kind of meat is this , it taste funny . I said it was cow and they all went eeeuuu.
 

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I'm a little later than the ice box my folks would say, but I often say it's in the fridge .
 

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I grew up on a farm with cows, and pecan and tung orchards. In the fall I'd pick pecans and tung nuts for my Christmas money. I dreamed of buying a High Standard .22 at the Western Auto, but never seemed to save enough money. We didn't lock the doors of our house, because the keys had long since been lost. I learned to drive when I was big enough to reach the pedals and learned to shoot about the same time. After school I'd enter by the front door, drop off my books, grab the Remington 550 that lived behind the kitchen door and head for the woods behind our house. My grandparents owned a general store and stocked yellow boxes of Western Super-X ammunition. I don't remember them selling any firearms except for the little Savage .22/.410 combo guns that the farmers all seemed to have. The local constable had a nickeled Combat Commander that stayed on the dash of his pickup. We boys would find an excuse to walk by it and break the 11th Commandment about not coveting your neighbor's Colt. I remember that freedoms were curtailed somewhat after Sharon Tate was murdered. Mom must have been afraid the Manson family might move in next door. We learned to say Yes Sir, and No Ma'am, and if an adult entered then room, you got up and offered your seat. Cozmo, this brings back good memories, I believe I'll try to find some Jackie Gleason reruns tonight.
 

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When I was small we lived on a farm in the sticks of Missouri. No electric, no indoor plumbing, a well with a hand pump, out house, etc. Everybody in that country had a water bucket with a ladle on a kitchen counter, if anybody wanted a drink they just took a ladle full and drank from it. Here's a family pic aunts uncles cousins, the woman third from the left was my mother but it was before I came along. I think the word is hard scrabble.
 

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I love when I grew up stories (even from my Grandpa , born 1897 , gone but not forgotten ). Thank you Cosmo . I have pasted on some of my old time skills to my 3 adult children and happy to see them pop out at times.
 
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