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Many of my favorite moments as a kid were just sitting around and listening to the tales and past adventures spun between my parents and aunts, uncles, and their friends. Some of our more youthful members here yern for the youth us old guys had while us old guys yern for the youth of our fathers and grandfathers. I think it all comes down to freedom and individual liberty more than material things. If I did now what I did 60 years ago, they would lock me up!..(no doubt about it).
 

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Discussion Starter #62 (Edited)
krag96 said:
If I did now what I did 60 years ago, they would lock me up!..(no doubt about it).
No doubt :) And you can add to that a good many of our parents and teachers would be in jail and us @ "social services" (foster homes) if things had continued as they were. Easy to forget and forgive. Humans are typically good at it.

I had to chuckle at so may of the comments. Things are different now. Some better and some worse. No question life is easier for the vast majority of us than it was for our parents and grand parents. Easier for sure, not saying it is better.

No so many had the time to pound away at a trivial pursuit such as the "evil machine" as Jim Martin calls it.

Damn few here wanting to stand behind a mule sun up to sun down these days or ride a horse to school. Any one that does likely hasn't done either.

The Colt forum is kinda like the old country store or local gun shop. The old guys drop in on occasion, get warm, discuss what matters to us or spin a yarn. The kids that are interested stay and listen. The ones that aren't just ignore the story tellers and stories, then go about their way sure of themselves with nothing new to learn. It's no wonder history repeats itself 馃槑

Every day some history dies with the men and women who lived it. If you live long enough and are lucky you come to that same conclusion.

I don't want to shoot BP. But I have.
I ride a horse (thankfully), because I want to not because have to.
I write to my friends on the computer. I've written with a fountain pen.
I've shoveled coal.
I've chopped wood.
I've lived in an unchinked log cabin.
I've eaten what I kill.

Prefer not to be n a position where any of them is the only option available.

No other place that I want to be right now than sitting at my desk :) I'm warm, dry, fed and the view is good.

716540
 

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My great-grandfather, proud of his corn crop. Most likely done with mules as his son, my grandfather (who passed in 1944) farmed with mules.
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The second photo is my other grandfather with his team. He used them until about 1953 when he got a new Case tractor. He kept the team until they died a natural death and buried them in the pasture. (Edited to correct the tractor and the year).

716543
 

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If you guys aren't sick of my memories I have some more. Below is a pic of my uncle and my Dad. Dad is on the right, he was born in 1888 and grew up in a sod house that on a farm his dad homesteaded. His dad was killed by a falling tree when he was young. Times were tough. Had some great stories, they were tough old birds.
 

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I remember that our family got it's first (black and white) tv in about 1953 or 54. It (the screen) was about the same size as today's 15" model and was mounted in a large wooden cabinet. When it would quit working, my dad would take all of the tubes out and go to the drugstore where they had a testing machine. He would find the bad one, buy a replacement for $2-3 and go back home to finish the repair. One time he let the side of his hand touch something it should not have and found out all about capacitors! I think the brand name was "Mitchell". Never saw or heard of another one! A bit later, I remember going to the gas station and buying gasoline for $.19 a gallon! That would have been about 1964 or so. The last new car my dad ever bought was right after WWII when he came home with a black,1948 Plymouth 2 door sedan. After that, all he had were used cars. Having lived thru the depression, he was a "frugal" person!
 

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If you guys aren't sick of my memories I have some more. Below is a pic of my uncle and my Dad. Dad is on the right, he was born in 1888 and grew up in a sod house that on a farm his dad homesteaded. His dad was killed by a falling tree when he was young. Times were tough. Had some great stories, they were tough old birds.
I've been trying to identify the machine they are sitting on. That looks like a pair of hoppers on each side of the boy. I suspect it is a planter?
 

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It's hard to tell what it is, the hoppers make you think fertilizer or planter....it isn't a seed drill that is for sure. It could have been used for planting shallow such as grass seed or a cover crop such as clover.....The sweeps are different...even for back then... . It's always possible it was used for harvesting pecans or whatever was grown in the orchard to the right. Those old implements are hard to tell from partial images.
 

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I'm not sure what that machine is, everybody used horse drawn equipment then. I remember dad had a Mason jar wrapped in burlap with a wire attached to the top for a handle, that was his canteen out in the fields, he could soak the burlap and keep the water kind of cool.
 

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If you are old enough to know what an ice box was and how they were used, let along still have that word in your vocabular and use it, I bet you have used a fountain pen. Not a cartridge pen but one with the little vacuum pump and lever to fill it. Folks cleaned up to go into town. Sunday was a day off from work.

When silver dollars were still in common use. A dollar could actually buy some thing. And gold coins were hard to find, secretly hoarded and hidden away.

All that makes a 5 hr gun fight with a Colt SAA seem "casual". These days there is plastic "money", throw away writing instruments, 20 round hand guns and 30+ round rifles that weigh about as much as a loaded 7.5" Colt.

View attachment 715843

Some folks will kill other folks with a rock given the chance. 5hr gun fights with a few casualties are likely to turn into hundreds dead or wounded easy enough.

View attachment 715841
I'm not sure what that machine is, everybody used horse drawn equipment then. I remember dad had a Mason jar wrapped in burlap with a wire attached to the top for a handle, that was his canteen out in the fields, he could soak the burlap and keep the water kind of cool.
All that makes one kinda wish for an ice box and a good six gun to come back in style. Likely gun fights would happen less often, be a lot shorter frame and everyone would have to learn how shoot to actually hit anything.

View attachment 715842
If you are old enough to know what an ice box was and how they were used, let along still have that word in your vocabular and use it, I bet you have used a fountain pen. Not a cartridge pen but one with the little vacuum pump and lever to fill it. Folks cleaned up to go into town. Sunday was a day off from work.

When silver dollars were still in common use. A dollar could actually buy some thing. And gold coins were hard to find, secretly hoarded and hidden away.

All that makes a 5 hr gun fight with a Colt SAA seem "casual". These days there is plastic "money", throw away writing instruments, 20 round hand guns and 30+ round rifles that weigh about as much as a loaded 7.5" Colt.

View attachment 715843

Some folks will kill other folks with a rock given the chance. 5hr gun fights with a few casualties are likely to turn into hundreds dead or wounded easy enough.

View attachment 715841

All that makes one kinda wish for an ice box and a good six gun to come back in style. Likely gun fights would happen less often, be a lot shorter frame and everyone would have to learn how shoot to actually hit anything.

View attachment 715842
 

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Hi, All,
I came along, before 'eversharp' pencils', and used 'Fountain pens' , because there wasn't anything else to use. I still have my first fountain pen, and some of my first grade 'lead pencils'. I have my Dad's prized, Real gold tipped, Fountain pen.
I grew up in a household that used an Icebox, because it was the only way to keep your fresh food cool. My wife, And I set up housekeeping in an old, two room, rented 'summer kitchen', of a farm house. We used used a borrowed icebox, to cool our food. I had do drive five miles in to town, every two days to, buy a 25# block of ice from the town's 'Ice house'. I wrapped it in newspaper for insulation, and sat it on the front bumper of my 1936 Ford car, to transport it to our home. Oh, by the way, that home was serviced, by a two hole 'outhouse'.
Those simple, days, unhampered, by the aggravation, of sometimes unwanted electronic improvements, and plastic, I oftentimes think, I liked much better.
 

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Hi, All,
Well, I messed up my last attempt at posting, and couldn't find a way to edit it, so I guess you folks will forgive me for this addition. In that 'outhouse' that I mentioned, The implements of torture, used to take part in the use of it, included, when in season, nice fresh corn cobs, both the red colored variety, for standard use, and white ones, to check whether the job was done efficiently. The standard implement in that era, was, outdated newspapers, Sears & Roebuck, Monkey Ward, Cousin & Fern, and other department store catalogues. This was done by lantern light, or flash lite. For unfortunate folks deprived of using those outhouses in the dead of winter, using those implements, has been deprived of one of life's most memorable experiences.
 

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Hi, All,
For unfortunate folks deprived of using those outhouses in the dead of winter, using those implements, has been deprived of one of life's most memorable experiences.
As a lad I would stay at my grandparents farm which too had an outhouse. However, in the winter the bedrooms had a "chamber pot" which my grandmother referred to as the "slop jar". I don't know how much the chamber pot differed from the outhouse because the bedroom seemed as cold as the outside (the coal burning stove was allowed to burn down in the evening before bedtime and wasn't stoked again until morning. It was the only heat source for the 4 room house). Sinking down in the feather bed mattress, covered by several quilts it was cozy and a hard place to leave to answer nature's call.
 

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In our family the "slop jar" was called a "thunder bucket".I'm still living like your grand parents,my main source of heat is a log burning stove in my front room that I let go out about 9:00 & cover up real good @ night,in the morning I light the oven in the kitchen & open the door to heat the kitchen.
 

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Jim, I think the way you are living contributes to your years and good health. As someone said earlier, the folks in those days and before were "tough old birds". Most of us these days are sissified with flushers, furnaces and air conditioners.
 

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The 'two-holer' was fairly common years ago, and there were even 'three' and 'four-holers'. There was a two-holer up to camp.
The outhouse up at Uncle Lee's was called 'the observatory'. It was just off the shed that led to the barn, and had about a 2 story drop to the 'disposal' area. They said it could be quite breezy in the observatory.
 

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Coal oil lanterns had their place then as they do now. We had several in the cellar that kept pipes from freezing in winter and one lit in the out-house that kept it...well, you appreciated it burning all night when you made the trip in the morning anyway! It was us kids duty to keep the lanterns filled and going. The wife and I still keep several coal oil lanterns and half a dozen lamps handy for emergency light and heat. One of those lanterns even has a set of small cook ware with it, you can fry an egg or heat a serving of soup on it. Those big hurricane lanterns puts out 1,100-1,200 BTU of heat each and last a day plus on a fill.

Fountain pens, they possess a certain ''class'' from years gone bye and were still better than the early ball point pens which as I recall didn't seem to last much longer than a few days or week. Dad always kept a short pencil in his pocket, wouldn't have anything to do with the ball points. Mom would write letters with a long black pen she dipped in a bottle of ink, write a few words and dip again like a quill.

One thing I haven't seen mentioned yet was the S&H Green Stamps and the, ''free-bees'' you would get for shopping at certain stores, buying a certain brand of, (usually soap) and the stuff service stations gave away. Mom got a Singer sewing machine from S&H Green Stamps, and would buy any brand of laundry soap that had a dish or glass in it. The store we shopped at every pay-day usually gave away china with a purchase. The service stations gave away various stuff dad called, ''trinkets'' most of the time, small items, sometimes a glass, pocket notebook, pen, key fob, collector coins, stuff like that.

A lot of stores hospitals, and businesses had ash trays for customers that smoked, dad would light up right in the isles of the grocery store and our family doctor wasn't to be seen without a lit cigar clenched between his teeth, even when examining or treating a patiant.
 

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Coal oil lanterns had their place then as they do now. We had several in the cellar that kept pipes from freezing in winter and one lit in the out-house that kept it...well, you appreciated it burning all night when you made the trip in the morning anyway! It was us kids duty to keep the lanterns filled and going. The wife and I still keep several coal oil lanterns and half a dozen lamps handy for emergency light and heat. One of those lanterns even has a set of small cook ware with it, you can fry an egg or heat a serving of soup on it. Those big hurricane lanterns puts out 1,100-1,200 BTU of heat each and last a day plus on a fill.

Fountain pens, they possess a certain ''class'' from years gone bye and were still better than the early ball point pens which as I recall didn't seem to last much longer than a few days or week. Dad always kept a short pencil in his pocket, wouldn't have anything to do with the ball points. Mom would write letters with a long black pen she dipped in a bottle of ink, write a few words and dip again like a quill.

One thing I haven't seen mentioned yet was the S&H Green Stamps and the, ''free-bees'' you would get for shopping at certain stores, buying a certain brand of, (usually soap) and the stuff service stations gave away. Mom got a Singer sewing machine from S&H Green Stamps, and would buy any brand of laundry soap that had a dish or glass in it. The store we shopped at every pay-day usually gave away china with a purchase. The service stations gave away various stuff dad called, ''trinkets'' most of the time, small items, sometimes a glass, pocket notebook, pen, key fob, collector coins, stuff like that.

A lot of stores hospitals, and businesses had ash trays for customers that smoked, dad would light up right in the isles of the grocery store and our family doctor wasn't to be seen without a lit cigar clenched between his teeth, even when examining or treating a patiant.
Oh and the miracle of coal oil! My grandfather (born 1873) always kept a few gallons nearby, not only for the heater stove, but for medicinal purposes. Mother said that if someone was bitten by a snake, the hand or leg would be placed in a bucket full of kerosene -- and the venom could be seen streaming out. My grandfather made a save from kerosene and bees wax that would be placed on an infected wound - and the stuff drew the poison out.

Oh it was neat growing up in the 1950's! Several times I would see an 1800's silver dollar in a cash register and would ask the clerk "Can I have that for a dollar"? I was never turned down, and they probably liked getting rid of the heavy Morgan dollar.

As kids we would sometimes earn money by walking the road ditches looking for discarded Coke bottles. I think we got 1/2 cent for every returned Coke bottle. Big money!
 

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Area51guy mentioned "frugal". That sure defines my grandfather, who came over in steerage on a ship from Italy when he was about 14 years old. At some point in the mid-1970's his old B&W TV had the picture tube go out. He found another B&W TV at a thrift store for something like $10 that had a working picture tube but no sound.
He then stacked the two TV's upon each other and when he wanted to watch TV he got the image from one TV and the audio from the other. No remote controls of course so when he wanted to change the channel he had to get up from his recliner and twist the knobs on both sets.
He was a barber all his life but somehow managed to accrue about a quarter million dollars among several bank accounts that no one knew existed until they found the bank books after his death at age 89. Grandpa could have afforded a new 25" color TV with a remote.
I also used to stay at my aunts cottage on Lake Erie during the summers. It only had an outhouse and a pump outside for well water. It did have electricity. Chamber pots were kept under the old four poster bed and for a little kid who grew up in the suburbs in the early 1960's going to the outhouse was a rather disturbing experience.
 

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Area51guy mentioned "frugal". That sure defines my grandfather, who came over in steerage on a ship from Italy when he was about 14 years old. At some point in the mid-1970's his old B&W TV had the picture tube go out. He found another B&W TV at a thrift store for something like $10 that had a working picture tube but no sound.
He then stacked the two TV's upon each other and when he wanted to watch TV he got the image from one TV and the audio from the other. No remote controls of course so when he wanted to change the channel he had to get up from his recliner and twist the knobs on both sets.
He was a barber all his life but somehow managed to accrue about a quarter million dollars among several bank accounts that no one knew existed until they found the bank books after his death at age 89. Grandpa could have afforded a new 25" color TV with a remote.
I also used to stay at my aunts cottage on Lake Erie during the summers. It only had an outhouse and a pump outside for well water. It did have electricity. Chamber pots were kept under the old four poster bed and for a little kid who grew up in the suburbs in the early 1960's going to the outhouse was a rather disturbing experience.
That reminds me of my maternal grandfather, (b-1883) he bought a certain brand of tobacco in a tightly wrapped brown paper roll or tube that said, "For chewing or smoking'' . He would grab a pinch and chew it, when done he would put it on a fence post or window sill to dry to be smoked in his pipe after a days work. Like your grandfather, he left a healthy estate.
 

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nd, 'ink wells ether as they were all esential
As a lad I would stay at my grandparents farm which too had an outhouse. However, in the winter the bedrooms had a "chamber pot" which my grandmother referred to as the "slop jar". I don't know how much the chamber pot differed from the outhouse because the bedroom seemed as cold as the outside (the coal burning stove was allowed to burn down in the evening before bedtime and wasn't stoked again until morning. It was the only heat source for the 4 room house). Sinking down in the feather bed mattress, covered by several quilts it was cozy and a hard place to leave to answer nature's call.
Those 'chamber pots' at our house were called 'thunder mugs'. I had almost forgot those long stationary ink pens, made of black painted wood, and had replaceable tips. Nether should we forget 'ink blotters', and plain old sand, used to absorb excess ink.
 
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