Colt Forum banner

21 - 38 of 38 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,607 Posts
I spent a few hours looking up family brands used in 3 states and going back to the oldest brand books I could fine. Even knowing the owners (which makes it a gazillion times easier) and specific years I knew the brands were being used, it still took some time. And I looked at hundreds of brands. Never did find the brands just looking through the brands!

Fun thing about that particular gun would beb finding the brand and the family it might have belonged to. I'm a big fan of the .32s.

I'd still start with the production date of the gun and go 10 years on either side of that, plus another 25 after production date.

And no question I would call on Monday and pay the extra expedited service just to get the original shipping location.

But then, I do like a good mystery :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,723 Posts
Several asked for more pictures. Someone thought cylinder might be replaced. I kind of thought the same. Maybe thats part of the appeal. A real worn everyday service revolver that has been used out on the range!!! Value? View attachment 655375 View attachment 655377 View attachment 655379
There is something wrong with this website! My original reply is gone. So here goes again.

The brand looks like a Rafter T, T Rafter, or some other interpretation. Cattle brand books exist at the State level, and also sometimes in the Counties. Also private printings of area cattle brands are known. Since "Yuma" is on this buttstrap, that may be the area to search.

Attached here are a few pages from an 1897 area brand book, just to show what these look like. This brand book was paid for by numerous ads of commission agents, saddle makers etc. The area covered were parts of Texas, Oklahoma Territory, New Mexico, Kansas, and Colorado.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
881 Posts
Ok, so when did they stop beveling the cylinder? That's why I thought it may be a later cylinder in the other thread.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,607 Posts
Looks like a later vintage cylinder to me?
Cylinder bevel ended in 1904. Gun is from 1916 so the cylinder is correct. I doubt the 2 piece woods grips are...but they might be. I'd want to letter the gun to get any back story there. If I ordered a gun to carry in 1916 I'd want wood or ivory(+ $) for durability and not black plastic. 32-20 is a odd choice. Not a bad choice mind you, just odd for the use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,607 Posts
Easy enough to see why one might at first think it is a 38 as most of the middle and lower part of the 2 is gone. On closer inspection the straight line at the bottom of the 2 and that line's 90 degree turn to vertical at the end of the 2's bottom tells me it is a 32 and not a 38.

32-20 makes a decent gun while in a saddle. The SAA might no be the best weapon's platform to take full advantage of the cartridge though. Enough power to put down an ailing horse or cow up close. Not enough to get the immediate attention of a big bull though. Or drop dinner in the form of a deer or a elk. Not that a 44 or a 45 will get you dinner but may be easier than a 32-20. A 32 sure makes packing extra ammo easy if you don't mind packing the extra gun weight on your belt all day :) Gun weights with similar material for the grips run 2# 5oz for a 45 and 2# 11oz for a 32. Lack of recoil, with a lessor cartridge and a heavier gun makes me think the gun in question could have been a youngster's. Obviously pure speculation on my part. But to be fair during that time frame the 32-20 was very well respected in some circles for personal protection, including a limited use in law enforcement.

38wcf


gun in question...



32wcf
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
In Texas the County Clerk keeps the brand registration records. We found the branding iron in the museum dated from 1855 and was registered to the county judge.

Brands are only protected in the county where they are registered and must be re-registered periodically to protect them. Make sense? If I live across the county line from you and register your brand in my county I could make sure some of your branded cattle showed up on my range. How could you prove it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,607 Posts
I put out some feelers on the brand today looking for a history.

Thought was the brand is a "Bar Lazy L". Anyone?

Yuma Co Az.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,607 Posts


NorwichCadet said:
Why not "Broken T" Ranch
Could easily be any of the translations mentioned prior in the thread including Broken T. "Bar Lazy L" came from a old ranch hand still living in the Yuma area. Just another suggestion from a guy use to reading brands.

I'd have typical thought it was lazy "Rafter" "<" ( very common brand sign) rafter, on it's side normally makes it "lazy" rafter. The T, if it is a T, is on it's side or bent, so lazy as well. But as you say, it could just as well be "broken".

Interesting brand, and for me anyway hard to read, so I've been puzzled. The idea with brands is to keep them simple but hard to run (change). This one is annoyingly simple but it would be easy to run if one were a mind to.

Wasn't cheap to get that brand engraved on the gun either. I have a family gun with the brand carved into the gutta percha grip. Easily done. Your ranch's brand and the County on the gun? Someone put effort and $ into that gun.

https://www.visitwhc.org/livestock-brands.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Looks like a Bar Lazy V maybe? Get an old Arizona brand book, where the gun says Yuma that is where I would start. Either that or the Yuma Museum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,111 Posts
Unusual, the Ranch is very crude, and the Yuma very professional. Obviously different engravers, looks like they squeezed the Ranch in later, or added the Yuma.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
289 Posts
I wish I knew what the brand stood for but I do know where that gun is for sale. Don't worry I haven't bought any of their guns as they always end up selling for more than I can afford. But it is nice to day dream about them, kinda like when people day dream about winning the lottery.
 
21 - 38 of 38 Posts
Top