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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have spent quite some time looking at pictures of all the various revolvers that members have posted. They are undoubtedly some fine pieces of workmanship.Would some of you please share your thoughts on why these older firearms are such an attraction to you?

Is it their simplicity? Is it a family heirloom that should be passed on? I wasn't raised in a family of gun owners so I can't really share in your enthusiasm but I'm sure that some of you have some interesting stories that we'd all like to hear.
 
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My story isn't interesting, but I appreciate fine workmanship and craftsmanship and those 2 qualities are what embody Colt Pythons and other Colt revolvers. If a gun is hand-fitted and hand polished, it's obvious but very few photos reflect the true craftsmanship that went into the Pythons and other blued Colt revolvers. It's something that has to be seen in person to be fully appreciated. Throw in the fact that Colt isn't making them anymore, and it becomes a little more apparent why people like them so much. Get your eyes and hands on a near flawless blued example of a Python and look closely and you'll understand better.
 

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Not offending at all. For me it's long been a love affair with firearms. I was taught to shoot and appreciate guns and safety at an early age and sort of grew up with them.

After many years of shooting all types of handguns I gravitated to the characteristics that I personally cherished; accuracy, mechanical excellence and the intrinsic beauty of Colt. The older Colt's also harken a feeling of nostalgia for me and heightens that allure.
 

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Unparalleled quality that will never be replicated in our lifetimes by any mass production techniques of the 21st century. Coupled with functionality and just plain usefulness. Merwin Hulberts can't be made at any level by anyone.
 

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I also was not raised in a household where we owned any firearms, My first handgun was the model 60 my parents gave to me when I graduated the police academy. But, love of guns, and blades started long before then as a young boy. I always liked the lines of a revolver. I watched every western, and detective, police show that was on TV. So all my childhood heros carried revolvers. I never appreciated the older revolvers until a few years ago, I only own a few but I still think that the way these old guns were built, and the way that they feel in your hand just surpasses any modern gun out there for me. I do own some modern handguns that I enjoy very much. But, the look and feel of an old Colt or Smith they just do not build them like that anymore. Plus the history that comes along with some of these old "wheelguns" is neat. They are classics that stood the test of time, and even after 30 years of carrying a gun. I still opt for an older revolver as my primary carry piece to save my life if need be. Even the home defense gun is a tried and true Colt revolver. What is the saying "God made man, Sam Colt made them equal". I just feel good when I am holding an old Colt or Smith in my hand.
 

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It's probably psychological, maybe genetic. When my Mother passed few years a ago I renovated her house and found that she collected everything, so much stuff one could hardly get around in it. After discarding couple tons of un-ID stuff, I spent months on eBay with the rest of it ---- except, of course, things I considered collectible.

I don't consider my interest in guns an "attraction". It is just a facet of the way of life I was born into, a pioneer family dating back generations. Descended from soldiers in the American Revolution, Texas independence from Mexico & Civil War (all documented) strong with lore and tradition involving strife, aggression, suffering and revenge, I grew up hearing the old folks "recollect" what had come down the same way to them. My G-Father I grew up with had been a Deputy Sheriff in 1890s Texas.

1930s Oklahoma was still in sort of a 'frontier' environment (as was a lot of the Midwest). All boys went to the 'picture show' (as movies were called then) on Saturday morning to see the latest Western and the next serial chapter. My prevailing interest is in 1880s to WW One revolvers & automatics, their ingenuity, precision, quality and other attributes that have tended to slip away today.

To most everybody guns were only tools or implements. My folks never 'snapped' (dry fired) a gun, paid little attention to its appearance but did clean bores after shooting. Kids played gun-games with guns from the 5&10 stores, we made them from wood & all hoped for a 'real gun' and now and then got one. My fondest kid memory is finding a S&W Model 1 1/2 in kitchen junk left in a vacated house.

Gun-wise I wasn't much different from the kids I grew up with & they retained their gun-interest as adults but nobody else became a collector. I did know one across town that collected. My first collectible gun, my Dad bought me on a trip to Alabama when I was about 15, mostly to shut me up trying to get him interested in the many bargains I saw, a Confederate musket for $1.50.

Probably a lot of pointless background info that doesn't do much for your WHY question. I guess the bug bites you or it doesn't. You might pose a similar question in forums of collectors of coins, stamps, dolls or any of the other things people collect.
 

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I think you will find most people who love firearms love most mechanical things. Cars, planes, boats, power tools :D. There is nothing like a nice quality tool, whatever job you are performing. Most roofers use paslode nailers, estwing hammers, etc. and you really will not see many harbor freight quality tools in a tradesman's box. When you have the proper tool it is then on you to master it, you gravitate towards the items that have the kind of quality that will help increase your success rate. Shooting a handgun is not a natural thing for most people and it takes a lot of effort to punch a 1" group at 25 yards or ring the gong at 100 yards. When you do something that gives you a sense of accomplishment you form a sort of attachment. Quality is admired and one tends to "obsess" a bit of the tools of the trades, regardless of what that trade is. Hendrix gravitated towards Fender, Page towards Gibson, and I never once seen a harmony guitar in either of their hands, at least after they "arrived".
 

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There are likely more reasons than members of the forum.

1. Family History: I have my dad's old Western Field 22 bolt action from the late 30s. My daughter has my mothers Ruge'r Bearcat from the 1960's-early 70's.

2. Nostalgia: I grew up in the West (OK, SoCal) and am a student of history. Here's a refinished, Colt Bisley from 1905. One of my favorite revolvers.



3. Mystery: Who had this firearm? What was it used for? Has it seen combat? or merely silent, boring duty, long nights of guard duty?
My WWI Colt New Service, reissued for WWII:



4. History: A 1943 1911A-1, carried by a sergeant on Iwo Jima and brought back after he received a battlefield commission. Blood splatters about 3" behind the muzzle.



5. Mechanical efficiency. Arguably the best combat handgun ever invented:



6. Beauty:



7. Raw Power:
OM Ruger 45 Colt with Randall Gamemaster==my hunting rig.



"Nuff sald?
 

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Second that Colt-SL, sounds like were from the same mold. Im also a collector of antique pockwatches as well, especially the pocketwatches made by illinois, Hamilton, and Elgin for the Railroaders. They are still some of the best timekeepers today.
 
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I love history. Colts were made during the era of exemplary American manufacturing quality. A Waltham pocketwatch required 1 year of manhours to build (spread over many workers). A Gibson Loar was tuned and adjusted for weeks by an audio genius, before shipping. A Bausch & Lomb binocular was the finest quality in the world. A Colt revolver was assembled, tested, disassembled and the timing adjusted by masters, over and over, before being complete. The polishing room was the best in the world.

Or this could be the reason, learning to shoot with my dad with a Colt Frontier Scout.

 

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To me it's a number of things. The mechanics of it, yes. But also the quality, the materials. Some of the nice old wood, if still in good condition.
And I like all things mechanical. Motorcycles, cars. Down in Cabo San Lucas, the lady at the motel took us back to see the huge Cat generator she had installed for when the power goes out. We had to admire the beauty of the thing.
But I also like the new stuff. New features, good quality and no wear or tear.
But not all the new stuff. Loaded chamber indicators are an abomination as far as I am concerned.
dc
 

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There are two things that are responsible for the modern world, guns and watches. Collecting them is collecting the history of the modern world. Guns and watches improved over time, the spill over of the technology used to create them, is the underlying reason for the industrial revolution.
 

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For me, it is nostalgia. I grew up in the 1950s and early 1960s in the Southwest U.S. Many sheriffs’ deputies still carried Colt or S&W revolvers. They wore cowboy boots and cowboy hats. The most popular television shows were westerns. The first gun I shot was a Colt single-action .22 in 1953. The first handgun I ever owned was a Ruger Super Blackhawk single-action .44 magnum revolver in the 1960s. I spent twenty-two years in the military starting in 1963. I carried a Colt M-16 in Viet Nam. I carried a 1911 off and on in the military. That is why I collect Colts, S&W double-action revolvers, Ruger single-action revolvers, and 1911s.


 

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To me it's a number of things. The mechanics of it, yes. But also the quality, the materials. Some of the nice old wood, if still in good condition.
And I like all things mechanical. Motorcycles, cars. Down in Cabo San Lucas, the lady at the motel took us back to see the huge Cat generator she had installed for when the power goes out. We had to admire the beauty of the thing.
But I also like the new stuff. New features, good quality and no wear or tear.
But not all the new stuff. Loaded chamber indicators are an abomination as far as I am concerned.
dc
I never thought of it that way - mechanical, technical -- I came from a family very challenged, with no mechanical aptitude or technical ability whatever. Me, brimming over with it, nobody appreciated anything I was interested in -- probably what intensified my gun interest & appreciation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks guys....I appreciate the pictures and comments!

I was born 2nd of nine children in 1951. Times were a little tough but not bad. Hell, What did I know! We had everything we needed and Life was simple. There was never much of a surprise at Christmas. It was always underwear or some board game that forced me to engage in playing with my brothers or sisters. I was left to my imagination when it came to playing outside with the neighborhood kids. We played a lot of cowboys and Indians in the nearby woods. Some of the kids from smaller families always got neat toy guns at Christmas. All I had was an imaginary gun from a branch torn off a nearby tree. I usually got killed off early because I wasn't any good at gun "sound effects."

When I graduated from high school in1969 the Draft was based on a lottery system. My number was 351 so I wasn't called up. I would have went if drafted. I don't think the mindset to enlist was as great as it was in World War II so the thought never entered my mind.

I guess what I'm getting at is that I spent most of my early years learning work ethics and the value of the Dollar. Dad was a general contractor so even at the age of ten or eleven I was mixing troughs of cement or hauling lumber. While I didn't choose the same path in Life as my father the lessons were well learned and now I can enjoy some of the things I couldn't have growing up. Firearms were never part of my life growing up but they are now although for different reasons.

Anyhow, thanks again for sharing. Some of us have a taste for fine Scotch but I guess I'll always be a beer drinker.
 
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Well my MOM wouldn't let me order one of the BENJAMIN AIR PISTOLS from POPULAR MECHANICS MAGAZINE when I was 13......

I now blame her for my unrelenting need to own everyone I see at gun shows :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes: RR.
 

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I cannot ever remember a time when I was not interested in guns, one way or another. I always admired the guns worn by the cowboy stars when I was a youngster. As I got older I became interested in the shooting sports. I bought and shot many, many different kinds of handguns, and long range shooting and hunting became my forte. As I experimented with ammunition and handloading, I began to appreciate the single action revovler for its strength and accuracy, plus its ability to "tame" the heavy recoil of magnum ammunition. Most often my choice was a Ruger Single Action Blackhawk or Super Blackhawk, both of which had the Colt Single Action Army as their inspiration. From this experience my preference has gravitated toward the Colt Single Action New Frontier, but also attempts to copy or springboard from such guns. I have spent much of my life shooting, my log book stands at the expenditure of over 200,000 rounds fired, most of this from Single Action revolvers. My admiration for these revolvers extends to the point I now usually capitalize the description Single Action.

Bob Wright
 
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