Colt Forum banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,186 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Been thinking about it a long time, so it's time to actually do it.

LOT of people buying handguns around here locally, and God bless'em, some have no clue what to do with them.

So, it's not going to be about self defense or home defense, just how to be safe, operate, and secure a handgun.

What do my compadres here think about it?

Train2Shoot.net - Training for the first time shooter!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,351 Posts
One of the guys in my Sportsmens Club started doing that and he seems to be doing quite well. He has partnered up with 2 or 3 of the local gun shops in the area that have ranges. So he holds the classes and they get new customers. Plus you'll be doing people a favor. It's surprising how many people will buy a gun and really don't know how to handle it. Good luck with your enterprise!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,186 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thank you.

Partnered with two local ranges, one a private club and both with air conditioned classrooms.

Just getting started, and a local news station did a segment at 6pm today.

They actually covered it well and said the right things! That's a good start. :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,780 Posts
Doc, the website, since I last saw it, looks about done; very succinct, very professional. I really like your approach too. Armed defense is one thing, but it means nothing until someone like you teaches newbies basic gun safety and how to properly handle the firearm. BEST of luck to you I know you'll do well!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
909 Posts
Can't speak to handguns, but I volunteer to coach teens at sporting clays and it is so rewarding I would pay them to do it. Kids are the future of shooting sports.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,186 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thank you.

And thanks to Brian Enos for planting the idea that fundamentals can't be rushed or skipped.

Also, I see a need in my community to help first-timer's.

I have this image of a single mom trying to make ends meet and thinking about buying a handgun as the social tide turns.

Someone needs to help people get off on the right foot and get the basics down pat, don't you think?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,380 Posts
Doc the site looks great.Here in New York we can't teach the live fire portion of the NRA Pistol Safety Course until the student gets his Pistol License and handgun,gotta love NYS law.....Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
I'm going to teach handgun safety

In another life I taught the Calif course PC 832 (Arrest & Firearms). At the behest of the college where I was teaching these classes, I started non-credit community education handgun safety classes for persons not involved in nor intending a law enforcement career. I adapted my PC 832 course material to the non-LE students. The classes turned out to be extremely popular. Although intended as courses (beginning and intermediate) to be taken only once, I had a lot of repeat students who wanted to come back through for the teaching, coaching and supervised range practice. After I moved to the mountains of NorCal I started teaching the state-mandated CCW course when it went into effect in '99. These courses have also been extremely well received. My intent on doing the CCW classes is to benefit the community, so I charge a minimal fee. From the outset I have taught the classes in our local church. All proceeds from the classes go to the church, so it has become their major fund-raiser. The church itself is such a class act that even from the start, they have never asked for any money for the use of the facility (which was the only local venue with the classroom/sanctuary space I needed). I tell my students that our Constitution is alive and well when the First and Second Amendments can work together like this. Our pastor and his wife both have CCWs. Since I derive no income from these courses, the only reasons I do it is because I believe it is the right thing to do, and I believe in the armed citizen. The experience of doing something for the community (in addition to my VFD career) is most rewarding, albeit intangible.

So, I would say go for it. Two points of advice:
1. There is no such thing as enough or even too much preparation. Tap whatever resources you can, research and learn constantly. You will never stop learning, all to the benefit of your students.
2. Commit 100% to your students. Do whatever you have to do to make your class the very best, better than anyone else's. That has to be your only purpose in taking on such an endeavor.
Your students will recognize this and appreciate it no end. Students can tell when an instructor does not have mastery of the material, so you must be the master.

Set the bar high enough and you will succeed. You will know this from the feedback from your students and the reputation you and your courses earn.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,974 Posts
In another life I taught the Calif course PC 832 (Arrest & Firearms). At the behest of the college where I was teaching these classes, I started non-credit community education handgun safety classes for persons not involved in nor intending a law enforcement career. I adapted my PC 832 course material to the non-LE students. The classes turned out to be extremely popular. Although intended as courses (beginning and intermediate) to be taken only once, I had a lot of repeat students who wanted to come back through for the teaching, coaching and supervised range practice. After I moved to the mountains of NorCal I started teaching the state-mandated CCW course when it went into effect in '99. These courses have also been extremely well received. My intent on doing the CCW classes is to benefit the community, so I charge a minimal fee. From the outset I have taught the classes in our local church. All proceeds from the classes go to the church, so it has become their major fund-raiser. The church itself is such a class act that even from the start, they have never asked for any money for the use of the facility (which was the only local venue with the classroom/sanctuary space I needed). I tell my students that our Constitution is alive and well when the First and Second Amendments can work together like this. Our pastor and his wife both have CCWs. Since I derive no income from these courses, the only reasons I do it is because I believe it is the right thing to do, and I believe in the armed citizen. The experience of doing something for the community (in addition to my VFD career) is most rewarding, albeit intangible.

So, I would say go for it. Two points of advice:
1. There is no such thing as enough or even too much preparation. Tap whatever resources you can, research and learn constantly. You will never stop learning, all to the benefit of your students.
2. Commit 100% to your students. Do whatever you have to do to make your class the very best, better than anyone else's. That has to be your only purpose in taking on such an endeavor.
Your students will recognize this and appreciate it no end. Students can tell when an instructor does not have mastery of the material, so you must be the master.

Set the bar high enough and you will succeed. You will know this from the feedback from your students and the reputation you and your courses earn.
I also taught PC 832 back in 1974 & for a # of years after moving to Az I taught handgun classes for an Az gun owners assoc. I didn't make any money out of it either.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,186 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Coached my first student yesterday.

She'd never fired a handgun before.

Using Brian Enos' ideas about stance, hold, and sighting (FRONT SIGHT) she practiced with Airsoft in the classroom.

Lo and behold, when we shot the .22's at the range, she immediately did well and applied BE's ideas.

Several things really pleased me:

1. She understood WHY be's ideas worked
2. She was able to quickly apply them.
3. She's confident and very eager to shoot again.

That's win-win-win right there!

And I KNEW it would work. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,774 Posts
Good TV ad. It is an excellent idea. I have met so many people that dont know anything about guns . As rural areas keep shrinking and fewer and fewer people come from rural areas, the problem will just get worse. I see people in gunstores and hearing them talk,I realize they dont have a clue. Its kinda scary to think so many people buy guns and have zero experience with them. Your class is definitely worth while, especially in a big city like Houston.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,186 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Thanks!

Only one problem surfaced:

The vintage M94 Taurus revolver has an action too stiff for her to operate.

And I thought it was almost as smooth as a Smith.

I don't want to have to drop $500+ in a training revolver, but it looks like a Smith or Colt might be necessary. :(

Ideas?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,974 Posts
Thanks!

Only one problem surfaced:

The vintage M94 Taurus revolver has an action too stiff for her to operate.

And I thought it was almost as smooth as a Smith.

I don't want to have to drop $500+ in a training revolver, but it looks like a Smith or Colt might be necessary. :(

Ideas?
I sent u a PM
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
686 Posts
I think I'll start teaching a course in Gun Safety. Seems like it's in vogue for sinners to become Preachers. Does it count that in my lifetime, I have:

1. Put a bullet through the roof,

2. Shot a hole in a bucket of roof sealer under my sink,

3. and put a hole in a closet door, thereby murdering three perfectly good suits. ?????????????
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,351 Posts
Looks great doc !!! Boy your prices are great too!! Around my neck of the woods the prices would be at least double what you charge. My hats off to you sir.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top