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A week ago I went to visit a Great Uncle of mine. He had sold me a lot of his guns in the past, because he wanted someone to enjoy them in the family as much as he did. He never had any kids himself. Most of his guns were quality (he sold me a Colt Combat Commander, Diamondback, Woodsman Match Target and the Midrange Wadcutter National Match in addition to several others) and he also gave me a few guns. I remember first hearing of my Uncle (my dad's mom's brother) when I was about 12. My dad would tell me how great the guns he had were, "Your Uncle Les has a heavy barrel woodsman (the match target that I later got. He ironically bought it from my dad who bought it brand new in the early 70s), a Colt Buntline, a long barrel luger with a shoulder stock, and a Colt 38 wadcutter." As years passed, I got into guns as those before me. Me and Les then began talking and bothering with each other more. At my grandmother's funeral, he offered to sell me some 22 rifles he had. A month or so later, I went over to buy them. He showed me his whole collection, which I had never saw all of it before. After he showed me most everything he had, I asked him "didn't you have a luger too", he replies, "ya I sold that to a guy I knew from the mill". My heart sank and still to this day, I am sad that happened. One of those things that's hard to get over. I never imagined he would sell it because he didn't need the money, and he inherited it himself, but that's life for you. He told me that he didn't know I liked it, and he also was one of those guys that didn't care about military arms, he liked commercial ones. He felt his best guns were the colts, and he wanted me to have them, which meant a lot to me and still does. After I bought the 22s, he later sold me the above mentioned handguns, and a Sako 78 HB 22. He kept a SAA 2nd gen buntline, and a 1858 Remington, telling me someday he would give them to me. He had been so generous to me already, I never bothered him about it. Once in a while I would offer to buy them, and then he would say "no I will give them to you". I wondered when or if he would. Those 2 guns were special to me, because he inherited them himself from my Great Grandfather Valenti. Valenti, some 50 yrs ago had a friend known as "Buzarella" who would give him guns. He gave my great grandfather the following: 2nd gen buntline, Remington 1858 revolver, CZ 27 rig, artillery luger with shoulder stock, Winchester 94 32 WSL, Savage 99 300 sav, Colt Officers Model 22, and perhaps 1 or 2 others. While those are not the most valuable guns in the world, it was a nice gesture back in the 1950s. Les gave me the CZ 27, sold a friend of his the luger, gave his brother the OM, gave his other nephews the Winchester and Savage and so there not many of these "Buzarella guns" as I call them left.

Last Saturday, I stopped by to visit Les and see some rifles another guy had for sale. The other guy was too high on his prices, so we went back to Les's house, and he gave me the Buntline 45 and the Remington 1858. I didn't know what to say. The Buntline is a 2nd issue/type per Garton (SN 26XXXSA) and the Remington appears to be a New Model 1863 variant of the 1858. These guns have been in my family for some 50 years or more. He also gave me a nice Colt Trooper 357 box, for one with 4in barrel, a target hammer and target stocks. I of course don't have that exact gun, I instead have a 38 trooper 4 in with target hammer standard stocks and a model 357 4in with target hammer and target stocks but I'm not complaining. I thought I would share this great story with my Colt forum brothers. I know many of you have had similiar things happen to you, and there is nothing quite like it.

Here are some of the newest editions to my collection. As you would expect, these guns will stay in my family. I have a son and daughter who will hopefully treasure this stuff
the way I do.
GEDC0071.jpg GEDC0073.jpg GEDC0076.jpg GEDC0077.jpg GEDC0074.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
More pics

The Remington may have been restored but its still a special gun to me. The trigger guard grips and cylinder match the SN but it appears that the barrel does not match. The gun bears inspection marks and the grips have the original cartouche. I wonder what stories this gun could tell? It was most likely made during the Civil War. Hopefully I find a good trooper for the box. Another excuse to buy a Colt! Not that I needed one though.
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Great guns, but an even greater story. It reminds me alot of my Uncle George and myself. We used to trade and sell guns back and forth to each other on a regular basis. Some of them with the provision that if we were to sell again, it would be back to the original seller. There were several guns that we bought and sold and sold and bought back and forth to each other numerous times. So enjoy those guns, but even more your relationship with your Uncle. That Buntline is fantastic. have you shot it yet???
 

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Great story, and beautiful guns!
Gotta love it when family takes care of family.
Congrats! :cool:
 

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Thanks for the kind words guys. I do plan on shooting the 45 colt. Hopefully I can get some targets that loosely resemble the Clanton gang. The Remington 1858 was carried by Clint Eastwood in Pale Rider and if you look closely, the "Bad" had one in The Good the Bad and the Ugly. One interesting thing here is that historically the Remington 1858 influenced the design of the Colt 1873, because before the Remington 1858, all of the Colt revolvers were of the "open top" variety. I believe there was a model Colt that had a top strap before the 1873. Both of these revolvers in history were monumental designs. I love guns that are rich in history.

I'd venture a guess that there are way way more replicas of these two designs than the originals. Its nice to have the originals...
 

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Wow
Thanks for letting us in on a bit of your family. Family guns are special. I hope your Children will appreciate them as much as you do & they will remain in your family.
Frank
 

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Thanks for the kind words guys. I do plan on shooting the 45 colt. Hopefully I can get some targets that loosely resemble the Clanton gang. The Remington 1858 was carried by Clint Eastwood in Pale Rider and if you look closely, the "Bad" had one in The Good the Bad and the Ugly. One interesting thing here is that historically the Remington 1858 influenced the design of the Colt 1873, because before the Remington 1858, all of the Colt revolvers were of the "open top" variety. I believe there was a model Colt that had a top strap before the 1873. Both of these revolvers in history were monumental designs. I love guns that are rich in history.

I'd venture a guess that there are way way more replicas of these two designs than the originals. Its nice to have the originals...
I could be wrong but I think the 1873 "Peacemaker' was the first Colt single action to have a top strap. The '71-'72 Open Tops were rejected by the military for the lack of...
 
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