Colt Forum banner
1 - 20 of 49 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Was handed a collection of SAA's from a very nice gentlemen who is having me research and broker his collection and this revolver has me curious what you gentlemen might think. I am certainly not new to SAA's but usually don't work too much with ones this early and apparently valuable. The action is very strong and the clicks are crisp. The cylinder has a very slight wiggle at full cock, but nothing drastic. Bore is rough but rifling is still there. Looks to be original all around. Anyone have any thoughts regarding rarity? Value? It is not lettered.

We are still deciding what route to take. Does anyone have any suggestions for sites online in regards to selling? Not a fan of Gunbroker, but I wasn't sure if there are other sites specifically for antique firearms such as this.
749987


749988


749989


749990


749991


749992


749993


749994


749995


749996
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,147 Posts
Fine looking revolver! The cylinder serial number does not match the gun. The barrel should have a matching serial number under the ejector housing. The grips appear to have been refinished and the cartouche and date possible enhanced. The first thing you need to do is order a Colt factory letter for it. The next thing to do would be to send it to John Kopec for his evaluation.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,086 Posts
Pictures on a computer can be deceiving. But that excellent cartouche is stamped over the wear on the grips, and the mismatched cylinder number is stamped over the drag line. Which makes other things suspect.
The left grip cartouche looks correct for an 1880 gun. The cylinder is mis-matched, although it was DFC inspected. The barrel should have a matching number under the ejector.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The owner isn't interested in dropping the cash for the letter, he is looking to sell the collection. Does anyone have a ballpark of value?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,483 Posts
The owner isn't interested in dropping the cash for the letter,
It's just as well. All a factory letter would tell you is that it was sold to the US Government. Nice pictures you are taking. You have a really nice camera/phone setup. If it was all matching I'd say it's in the 6000 to 6500 price range but not sure how much the mismatched cylinder dings it. Collectors who want an all matching US might not have any interest in it so it's left up to those who want a US but maybe don't want to spend the money to get a totally correct one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,527 Posts
I’m a little late to this thread, but I agree with all who posted before me. It’s an original Cavalry Model with mismatched cylinder, with enhanced cylinder serial numbers. And, the grips have been refinished and cartouche and date have likely been enhanced. I should also mention that the metal surfaces of the revolver appear to have been cleaned.

A letter from Colt will just tell you the exact day shipped to the U S Government. A letter to John Kopec, www.johnakopec.com is unlikely to reveal significantly more that we have already revealed in this thread. Especially if the owner wants to put no additional funds into this one.

BUT, it IS a Cavalry Model that has not been refinished, other than the grips, which means that cleaned metal surfaces exhibit a tight fit. Alterations were likely meant to strengthen areas after cleaning, such as the numbers on the cylinder (and also markings on the grips after refinishing), but probably not meant to deceive.

The cylinder might have been mismatched in the field.

An entry level Cavalry Model collector might be interested in this David F Clark sub inspected Cavalry Model revolver.

I would list it at $7000 in the classified ads section of this forum and lower the price periodically until it sells, but I think it should be worth at least $5000.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,777 Posts
My vote goes to original grips. IMO the cartouche is original and untouched. Cylinder issue would kill value for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,527 Posts
My vote goes to original grips. IMO the cartouche is original and untouched. Cylinder issue would kill value for me.
I think the grips are original, as the fit is so good, but I’m fairly certain the cartouche and date have been enhanced following a refinish.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,799 Posts
For me, the cylinder kills the deal. From the pictures, all of the markings on the cylinder are way too good to be original for a worn cylinder in that condition. But that is just from observation on the pictures shown.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,777 Posts
I think the grips are original, as the fit is so good, but I’m fairly certain the cartouche and date have been enhanced following a refinish.
Don't think so, the DAL is a carbon copy of mine. The 1880 is heavily struck but I still think original. You know what they say about opinions and bellybuttons! ;) We'll discuss it at the Colt show come the end of the month.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,799 Posts
Don't think so, the DAL is a carbon copy of mine. The 1880 is heavily struck but I still think original. You know what they say about opinions and bellybuttons! ;) We'll discuss it at the Colt show come the end of the month.
Ngraver company makes custom stamps. They came to a gun show with many of their stamps and let us try them on wood and metal. When compared with originals they were indistinguishable.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
132 Posts
The owner isn't interested in dropping the cash for the letter, he is looking to sell the collection. Does anyone have a ballpark of value?
Well, what you have is a fairly desirable Colt among Colt collectors since it is military issue. The drawback is perhaps the grips as it appears to be somewhat enhanced. The mismatched cylinder isn't that big a deal & possibly happened out in the field & seems to be within the inspector's period, so can be forgiven but does reduce value somewhat. The last 4 numbers of a revolver serial # always is what appears on the cylinder. It's your call to get a Colt letter but all it will tell, when it was shipped & will always show, shipped to the U.S. Government and you can find that info out yourself. Got good clear numbers, Insp. marks & U.S. stamped. It's not in the best of shape but the U.S. is what most guys look for . A guesstamit as to value anywhere from $4500 - 6000 as it does have issues but albeit, not too serious
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,799 Posts
I

f that’s not a crime it SHOuLD be!
All of the people doing restorations and partial restorations use stamps like this. In reading Kopec letters, Kopec frequently refers to "facsimile" markings he observes. Very common. And many of the people who own these guns do not care. They just want the gun to look correct. A guy here recently showed pictures of his nickel gun with fake US and 45 cal markings. Most of the people here did not think that was any big deal.

People who do this say they are simply doing it to return the gun to it's original condition. Like people who put non original barrels, cylinders, hammers, etc. on guns to make them into their original configuration. Most professional restorers even put non Colt parts on Colt SAAs. Some of the people on this forum have boasted about guns they have altered with non original parts to make the gun appear original,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
488 Posts
All of the people doing restorations and partial restorations use stamps like this. In reading Kopec letters, Kopec frequently refers to "facsimile" markings he observes. Very common. And many of the people who own these guns do not care. They just want the gun to look correct. A guy here recently showed pictures of his nickel gun with fake US and 45 cal markings. Most of the people here did not think that was any big deal.

People who do this say they are simply doing it to return the gun to it's original condition. Like people who put non original barrels, cylinders, hammers, etc. on guns to make them into their original configuration. Most professional restorers even put non Colt parts on Colt SAAs. Some of the people on this forum have boasted about guns they have altered with non original parts to make the gun appear original,
As far as collecting/restoring goes, there is a wide range of what constitutes "acceptable" from collector to collector. Car guys accept refinishes and replacement parts without question. M1 Garand collectors cast deep aspersion on people who make the stamps and for any piece of wood with "enhanced" or "new" markings. Single Actions seem to be somewhere in the middle, a properly restamped barrel or stocks seems to be acceptable although reduced in monetary value.
 
1 - 20 of 49 Posts
Top