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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I noticed this long flute on Guns International the other day...

Colt SAA long flute cyl made in 1915

Its serial number is 329580 which is slightly below the generally accepted starting serial number of 330001. Kopec notes in his "A Study" that there are 8 known out of sequence long flutes in existence (at that time). It's also interesting to note that this revolver shipped in May of 1915 while my long flute 330509 shipped in March of 1914, although I guess for whatever reason it was common for those early numbered undocumented long flutes to ship later. Unfortunately the seller tells me that Colt won't certify that it shipped with a long flute, although they do note this on the letters of all guns that fall into the "accepted" range, so with a gun like this I guess you're taking somewhat of a chance. It's a nice gun though it does seem a tad overpriced for what it is.

For whatever reason I kind of geek out on long flutes.
 

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That is a high price for an out-of-range long flute that cannot be verified. I wonder if the back of the cylinder has the 2 or 3 digit number that matches that of the serial number. If it does, that would add credence to the authenticity of the gun.
 

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I've seen several long flutes through the years that are a few hundred numbers before the known long flute range through the years and I supposed that colt used some double action cylinders on single actions before they actually made the push of "330,001 to 331,480" have double action cylinders record entry in the ledgers. I'm sure that gun pictured is as right as rain. It's not the "norm" because of the serial number but I believe it's a correct gun. Valuation on it will be up to the person who likes it for what it is (which isn't the norm) but I know a lot of guys who like to buy guns that are "different" than the standard of the time period.

#1 reason I believe it's correct.....look at the finish.....most long flutes have a really dark blackish blue finish. If someone had taken a cylinder out of an original 1878 with original finish on it and converted it for use with a single action a pre 1905 1878 cylinder (last year of production) wouldn't have the blackish blue as this one pictured in the auction has on it. It would be the shiny blue that you find on turn of the century 1878's. The folks at colt took a double action cylinder and machined the cylinder notches on it and put it in the saa and finished it all together.
 

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I've seen several long flutes through the years that are a few hundred numbers before the known long flute range through the years and I supposed that colt used some double action cylinders on single actions before they actually made the push of "330,001 to 331,480" have double action cylinders record entry in the ledgers. I'm sure that gun pictured is as right as rain. It's not the "norm" because of the serial number but I believe it's a correct gun. Valuation on it will be up to the person who likes it for what it is (which isn't the norm) but I know a lot of guys who like to buy guns that are "different" than the standard of the time period.

#1 reason I believe it's correct.....look at the finish.....most long flutes have a really dark blackish blue finish. If someone had taken a cylinder out of an original 1878 with original finish on it and converted it for use with a single action a pre 1905 1878 cylinder (last year of production) wouldn't have the blackish blue as this one pictured in the auction has on it. It would be the shiny blue that you find on turn of the century 1878's. The folks at colt took a double action cylinder and machined the cylinder notches on it and put it in the saa and finished it all together.
Jim, Just looking at that SAA, it does not show any of the characteristics that one would expect for a gun that had been faked. Your comments are right on!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I know stamped numbers can be faked, but wouldn't the cylinder have SOMETHING numbered on it?
I believe Kopec stated that about 50% of long flutes had partial serial numbers on the back of the cylinder. I have 2 lettered 38-40 long flutes and neither of them have anything stamped on the cylinders.
 

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I know stamped numbers can be faked, but wouldn't the cylinder have SOMETHING numbered on it?
My experience has been that you don't see 2 digits on the back of the cylinder until around 1916 or so and then it's hit and miss...but by the 1920's it was pretty well "hit". I've bought several 20's and 30's guns lately and every one of them has a numbered cylinder. Always the last 2 digits on mine.
 
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