Colt Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,550 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
The International Practical Shooting Confederation (IPSC) was started in 1976 by Jeff Cooper and others. As the publicity and popularity of practical pistol shooting spread across the country many military surplus pistols were "customized" and found new careers. Not a military gun the example below started life in 1952 as a Colt Government Model. 257779-C was put together, as the original owner wanted, with some old parts and some new parts. What mods do you see?


Here are five of the most famous shooters from the beginning of practical shooting. Left to right: Ray Chapman, Elden Carl, Thell Reed, Jeff Cooper and Jack Weaver.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,800 Posts
What looks like blue-over-blue finish, military walnut grips, wide-spur hammer, fitted barrel bushing, checkered straps and Micro sights with a wide dovetail cut.

Very typical of the genre and preceding the long thumb safety or ambidextrous safeties made popular by Armand Swenson, the chamfered magazine well and opened ejection port.

A couple of years after this piece was built, those amenities would become de rigeur - along with 'Armaloy' finishes, squared, checkered trigger guards and S&W Kit Gun adjustable rear sights.

The shooters all competed with one another and all became 'Combat Masters' after Cooper invented that title and bestowed it upon them.

'Guns and Ammo' magazine is chock-full of articles and photos, if one digs far enough back.

Thell Reed is uncommonly 'sudden' - an absolute wizard with a Colt SAA - he teaches Hollywood 'stars' how to handle firearms and not look fumble-fingered.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,195 Posts
It took a long time before IPSC reached NW gun clubs but when it did the game was more fun than any other. Great guns plus it brought movement into shooting. Add to that it opened a big door in reaction targets that let you see you hit them. Our area developed some of the greatest events ever and produced some great shooters. Even as a lowly C class shooter I had great fun. It all changed of course because that's the way things were but man was it fun while it lasted.

My gun was a Series 70 with the finger bushing removed and adjustable sights added. It ran just great with 200 grain lswc loaded to major power factor and they checked your rounds over a chronograph. Milt Sparks leather then Earnie Hill rig, what a riot to get out there and shoot and move with your favorite Colt.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,465 Posts
Was that safety used in '52? Will have to dig out my vintage Stoeger's to see. Kinda surprised that the port is not lowered and flared. As to back straps, what is up with the current flat strap rage? IIRC, the arched housing was adopted as it supposedly helped pointing over the 1911 flat strap. That group pic is a bad guy's worst nightmare. Coroner would find one ragged hole!
 
  • Like
Reactions: nowinca and ei8ht

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,800 Posts
That safety was in use when that piece was built.

A flat mainspring housing fits a smaller hand better, and if the grips have palm swells like Herrett's - it makes the piece more ergonomic.

The arched mainspring was developed so that the trigger was more easily reached.

It boils down to individual fit - arched housings used to get ground down on the side, to better fit a shooter's hand instinctively - but those were all done by individuals and not factory work.

I took a serrated flat mainspring housing from a Gold Cup and drilled it and 'dished' it to fit a GI lanyard loop for my personal Government Model - using an aluminum National Match trigger, that combination fit my needs perfectly.

Still does...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,195 Posts
Only mods I can see are the checkered front strap, arched mainspring housing with lanyard and adjustable sights along with a ramped front sight.

Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,852 Posts
That's a real quintet in the photo. All five have been incredibly influential in modern hand gunning and the use of the handgun in self-defense. Maybe I should say the "art" of the handgun in self-defense rather than "use".

Jack Weaver alone popularized the "Weaver Stance"...though he really refined it and demonstrated its superiority. When in the federal academy all were trained in but it wasn't called the "Weaver Stance"...it was referred to as the "FI" stance..."field interview" as it's how an officer normally stands when interacting with someone...a natural way to stand and keeps one's sidearm away from the other person.

It's amazing to see five legends not only in one photo but they worked together to increase the art of hand gunning.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,195 Posts
Liked some of the early stories about the shooters. I recall reading Cooper telling one about Weaver in a match a Big Bear. Cooper said the last target was at 100 yards so he hit the ground and shot a "possible", while Weaver stood up and made an x ring hit to win. Competition is what Americans are about and looking at the old guns brings back wonderful memories.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,465 Posts
That safety was in use when that piece was built.

A flat mainspring housing fits a smaller hand better, and if the grips have palm swells like Herrett's - it makes the piece more ergonomic.

The arched mainspring was developed so that the trigger was more easily reached.

It boils down to individual fit - arched housings used to get ground down on the side, to better fit a shooter's hand instinctively - but those were all done by individuals and not factory work.

I took a serrated flat mainspring housing from a Gold Cup and drilled it and 'dished' it to fit a GI lanyard loop for my personal Government Model - using an aluminum National Match trigger, that combination fit my needs perfectly.

Still does...
My hands are not at all big, but the arched housing does the trick. Gun-to-hand fit is very personal as you say. Witness the interchangeable backstraps appearing on all of the polymer rigs out there.
 
  • Like
Reactions: ei8ht

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,844 Posts
Classic Swenson pistols...



and the gun that likely changed "practical pistols" forever...




and one of the last competitive versions in IPSC prior to optics and 38 Super

 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top