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Good evening Colt owners,

Just bought a new-to-me Nickel Colt SAA in 357. Mag made in 2007. I've taken it shooting twice now and I experienced something a little odd today. When extracting the cases, after dispatching some justice on an old coffee can, I notice an unfired cartridge with the primer struck off center to the right where the primer and brass meet. Didn't happen again the few cylinders full I put through it after the fact. After taking it apart and cleaning it I worked the action and it happen again. The cylinder had over travelled slightly once I fully cocked the gun but then aligned perfectly the next 100 times I worked the action. My question to the community is, is it me and not the gun? I couldn't get the gun to replicate it again but my theory is as I cocked the hammer, I lightly pressed on the trigger a little and and caused the gun to over travel. Don't know if that's possible or not but I hope its me and not the gun. It's easier for me to correct a bad habit than fix a gun. Any help is appreciated.
 

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You need to check the timing. With the hammer back the bolt should be in place locking the cylinder up in perfect alignment with the barrel. If it's moving with the hammer back, there is an issue and you need to get it resolved before shooting it again. Pulling the trigger should do nothing but allow the hammer to fall.
What He Said.
 

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Alan it would be more plausible the bolt has not yet engaged the stop notch in the cylinder.

Even with a bolt/sear spring not tightened down it still should stop at the back side (deepest) side of the stop notch in the cylinder and lock it in place as you stated above.

Kroger: does the bolt “pop up” on the 3rd click? Can you audibly hear it’s?
 

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Alan it would be more plausible the bolt has not yet engaged the stop notch in the cylinder.

Even with a bolt/sear spring not tightened down it still should stop at the back side (deepest) side of the stop notch in the cylinder and lock it in place as you stated above.

Kroger: does the bolt “pop up” on the 3rd click? Can you audibly hear it’s?
Yes the bolt pops up and you can hear it as well. After working the action more and looking inside I noticed some surface rust on the sear bolt spring and cleaned it off. Is it possible its lost some strength due to the rust?
 

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Good evening Colt owners,

Just bought a new-to-me Nickel Colt SAA in 357. Mag made in 2007. I've taken it shooting twice now and I experienced something a little odd today. When extracting the cases, after dispatching some justice on an old coffee can, I notice an unfired cartridge with the primer struck off center to the right where the primer and brass meet. Didn't happen again the few cylinders full I put through it after the fact. After taking it apart and cleaning it I worked the action and it happen again. The cylinder had over travelled slightly once I fully cocked the gun but then aligned perfectly the next 100 times I worked the action. My question to the community is, is it me and not the gun? I couldn't get the gun to replicate it again but my theory is as I cocked the hammer, I lightly pressed on the trigger a little and and caused the gun to over travel. Don't know if that's possible or not but I hope its me and not the gun. It's easier for me to correct a bad habit than fix a gun. Any help is appreciated.
So you are basically saying, "with no trigger in place, can I over-rotate the cylinder while pulling the hammer all the way back"? If the lock bolt is falling before the chamber is fully rotated, the chamber should not advance past the bore. It sounds like your lock bolt is hesitant in falling. Consider removing that lock bolt and polishing both sides with #600 wet-dry sandpaper. Re-install and oil the lock bolt. Then see if that odd occurrence ever happens again.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
After looking at the gun again and fully dissambling it and reassembling it, the only way I can get the cylinder to not lock up is if I put the gun on half cock rotate the cylinder to exactly right before it makes a click and then fully cock the gun. When I do that, the bolt engages and the cylinder doesnt move.
 

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So you are basically saying, "with no trigger in place, can I over-rotate the cylinder while pulling the hammer all the way back"? If the lock bolt is falling before the chamber is fully rotated, the chamber should not advance past the bore. It sounds like your lock bolt is hesitant in falling. Consider removing that lock bolt and polishing both sides with #600 wet-dry sandpaper. Re-install and oil the lock bolt. Then see if that odd occurrence ever happens again.
On the 1873 SAA and other pattern revolvers cylinder rotation is accomplished by means of a "hand" attached to the hammer. The "bolt" or cylinder stop is actuated downward by a small stud protruding from the hammer that engages a hemispherical arm extending rearward from the bolt. As the hammer arcs back, the stud loses engagement and the bolt snaps into the cylinder recess under spring pressure. The trigger in a SAA has nothing what-so-ever to do with how and whether the cylinder rotates, locks, unlocks, or takes off for Mars.
The most common issue is a weak bolt (cylinder stop) spring. Originals use s flat spring with more durable springs being crafted using spring rod, bent to an appropriate shape.

Cylinder "over rotation" on a single-action is always the result of the bolt failing to index into the cylinder stop. Slow cocking gives the bolt more "time" to jump upward. Fast, cocking can rotate the cylinder past the bolt before it can pop up adequately to stop the cylinder.

Assuming the revolver once worked properly, your first thought is a sluggish bolt...either spring, or a HUGE amount of debris somehow trapped inside the frame.
The "beauty" of the SA design is that you can remove the trigger and the revolver is still functional.
 

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On the 1873 SAA and other pattern revolvers cylinder rotation is accomplished by means of a "hand" attached to the hammer. The "bolt" or cylinder stop is actuated downward by a small stud protruding from the hammer that engages a hemispherical arm extending rearward from the bolt. As the hammer arcs back, the stud loses engagement and the bolt snaps into the cylinder recess under spring pressure. The trigger in a SAA has nothing what-so-ever to do with how and whether the cylinder rotates, locks, unlocks, or takes off for Mars.
The most common issue is a weak bolt (cylinder stop) spring. Originals use s flat spring with more durable springs being crafted using spring rod, bent to an appropriate shape.

Cylinder "over rotation" on a single-action is always the result of the bolt failing to index into the cylinder stop. Slow cocking gives the bolt more "time" to jump upward. Fast, cocking can rotate the cylinder past the bolt before it can pop up adequately to stop the cylinder.

Assuming the revolver once worked properly, your first thought is a sluggish bolt...either spring, or a HUGE amount of debris somehow trapped inside the frame.
The "beauty" of the SA design is that you can remove the trigger and the revolver is still functional.
This is a very good explanation. I would just like to go one step farther and say that you can break every part inside a SAA and still make it fire in an absolute emergency by holding the cylinder inline by hand and whacking the back of the hammer with a solid object.
 

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It's likely that Mike got it from the same magazine I did.

Back then, the concept of 'survivalism' was a big topic and folks were talikng about various weapons that were double-tough and the SAA was one.

Still and all, trying to align a cylinder with one hand and managing something in the other to strike the hammer when someone was closing in is a seriously dedicated act, and I'd pay to watch.

Chances are, the other guy'd just pull his own trigger - kinda like the scene where the scimitar-wielding arab meets Indiana Jones in the marketplace, and learns a lesson on the correct choosing of both weapon and fight.
 

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It's likely that Mike got it from the same magazine I did.

Back then, the concept of 'survivalism' was a big topic and folks were talikng about various weapons that were double-tough and the SAA was one.

Still and all, trying to align a cylinder with one hand and managing something in the other to strike the hammer when someone was closing in is a seriously dedicated act, and I'd pay to watch.

Chances are, the other guy'd just pull his own trigger - kinda like the scene where the scimitar-wielding arab meets Indiana Jones in the marketplace, and learns a lesson on the correct choosing of both weapon and fight.
Just love this scene and the expression on “Indy’s “ face as he drew his “other” recognizable revolver
 
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