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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I recently inherited my grandfathers 1918 Colt 1911 - appears to have the 1913 slide with the Colt insignia on the slide back near the hammer (not inside circle). Serial number 23xxxx. Everything looks to be original based on the markings and my research besides maybe the barrel- unsure how to verify that marking. BUUUTTT I’m wondering if this gem of a pistol is ruined because pap had the gun parkerized. Please tell me the gun isn’t ruined or hasn’t lost all of its value because of this. Thanks for any and all comments from the experts here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Welcome from mid-Michigan! A family heirloom is always priceless. Post some pics so others can provide you with the info you requested.
I’ll post some pictures tomorrow when I get it back out of the safe. Definitely priceless to me regardless of what it’s “market value” is and will never be sold in my lifetime.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Are you sure he had it Parkerized, or has it been through a rebuild while in the military? Of course it doesn't have the same value as it would have in original finish.
I’ll drop some pictures in tomorrow. It’s possible it went through a rebuild since he brought it home from his service in Vietnam - although maybe he traded an army buddy for it at some point post war. Would a WW1 pistol still have been in service for Vietnam?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Does the finish look similar to this? This is a 1918 Colt that was parkerized as part of an arsenal refurbishment at the Augusta Arsenal.
View attachment 710917
Very similar to this bu looks like my grips are not original and slide is slightly different as well. USMC rebuild I assume knocks some value off of it.
 

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There is a chance it is an arsenal rebuild. I have a WWI era that was rebuilt and parkarized for WWII. Most are marked, some are not. There is both a 1911 forum and a CMP forum where if you show close shots of the other side, they may be able to tell you. Putting the plastic grips on was common during refurbishment. These have a strange look to them though, checkering is seldom worn like that.
 

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I’ll drop some pictures in tomorrow. It’s possible it went through a rebuild since he brought it home from his service in Vietnam - although maybe he traded an army buddy for it at some point post war. Would a WW1 pistol still have been in service for Vietnam?
A WWI 1911 would have still been in inventory during Vietnam. I have an Army field manual from 1971 entitled “Pistols and Revolvers”. On the first page it discusses that.

“The M1911 pistol isn’t no longer a standard weapon for the US Army and only a few remain in the inventory. These will be modified as they appear in maintenance channels. The differences between the M1911 and M1911A1 pistols are minor and all parts are interchangeable.”
 

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I recently inherited my grandfathers 1918 Colt 1911 - appears to have the 1913 slide with the Colt insignia on the slide back near the hammer (not inside circle). Serial number 23xxxx. Everything looks to be original based on the markings and my research besides maybe the barrel- unsure how to verify that marking. BUUUTTT I’m wondering if this gem of a pistol is ruined because pap had the gun parkerized. Please tell me the gun isn’t ruined or hasn’t lost all of its value because of this. Thanks for any and all comments from the experts here.
1 of my 1911's (not a colt) I wish) is parkerized. It's only 4 years old. And it's already showing wear & rust (on the beaver tail). I don't like that. I have to keep it well oiled. But it's a good shooter & very accurate. To say the least I will never buy a gun that has been parkerized!
 

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Not the same finish at all - look to bead-blasting for that finish on a newer piece.

Parkerizing was applied for its durability and served the military well for decade upon decade - it wasn't commercially applied.
 
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