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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If I slowly cock the hammer all the way back, I can then push the cylinder ever so slightly and hear it "click" into battery. Just picked it up this evening, bought it over the internet so I didn't get to personally inspect the gun, but it barely has a turn line.Please tell me it isn't so. /forums/images/graemlins/confused.gif
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
A1A,
Thanks for the info. (Couldn't get the search engine to work properly) Checked my Python per Dr. D's instructions. All other functions were perfect except for cylinder lockup. The hammer reaches full cock before the bolt drops into the notch. I did notice that while holding the hammer from dropping, when the trigger is pulled it does move the cylinder into full lock up. So my question is - is the gun OK as is - will it wear in to the proper timing - or do I need to send it back to the factory?
 

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It's out of time, and it will only get worse as the gun is used.

This is the classic Colt out-of-time condition.
The good news is, the gun is safe to shoot as is, as long as you insure that the cylinder always gets locked properly.

This can be caused by wear and tear, abuse, or it can be simply a matter of parts seating and wearing in.
If the guns in nice condition, it's probably seating and wearing in.

The "fix" can be as simple as properly stretching a part, to replacing a part.
I can recommend the Colt factory, or Pittsburgh Handgun Headquarters, who used to be Colt's preferred warranty service center.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks dfariswheel. I will try PHH since they are only on the other side of the state from me. I am extremely surprised by this situation. The gun is in magnificent condition other than the timing issue. No high edge blue wear, and only the faintest of a turn line. Previous owner and I have talked on the phone several times, and based on those conversations and the condition of the gun I believe him when he tells me the gun hasn't been shot since the late 70's (S/N dates to 1976)and even then only a couple of boxes. Even my dealer commented on the great condition of the gun.
 

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[ QUOTE ]
This is one of those "Who knows?" situations.

[/ QUOTE ]

Sometimes I think I specialize in those based on their frequency! /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif
 

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I just checked the timing on my recently purchased Agent as per the above instructions. Checks out fine. Thanks Dfaris.

If you don't mind, sir, will you share with us something on your background?
 

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Started out as a Master watchmaker, and sort of "fell in" to gunsmithing.

In a small town, when you have something no one knows how to fix, you take it to the jewelery store watchmaker or the jeweler.
So, you see adding machines, electric guitars, foreign car fuel injections systems, (before they were common), and....Guns.

When it's guns, and everybody who worked at the store was into guns, free advice to friends becomes repairs, and repairs soon turn into a money making business.
When word spreads to gun stores that someone knows how to do GOOD work, you start getting trade work, and in my case when word spread that I knew how to work on Colt DA revolvers, other gunsmiths started sending in work.

Soon, the jewelery store with an on-site watchmaker and a jeweler becomes a jewelery store/gunsmithing business and the boss didn't know which he liked better, so we did it all.

My part would be railroad watches or Rolex's in the morning and Python's or Detective Specials in the afternoon.
On the side I liked working with military firearms, and did true hand-made "one-off" custom leather for selected customers.
Either those who needed a concealed holster and just couldn't find what they needed, OR a VERY select few people who could afford totally hand-made and hand-stitched high-end leather.

The jeweler made "one-off" custom rings, mountings and repairs, and fine rifle work, with incredible hand-made black powder rifles as a side.

The boss liked finer shotguns and automatic pistols.
So, we pretty well had all bases covered.
It was an interesting career.
 

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[ QUOTE ]

It was an interesting career.

[/ QUOTE ]

Sounds like it. I am a teacher, but I like to work with my hands as much as possible--static aircraft models and R/C submarines.

Thanks.
 

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[ QUOTE ]
This is the classic Colt out-of-time condition.
This can be caused by wear and tear, abuse, or it can be simply a matter of parts seating and wearing in.
If the guns in nice condition, it's probably seating and wearing in.

[/ QUOTE ]

So, continuing on subject - which parts of even well fitted Python will probably wear out first?
 

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The hand and bolt are the most subject to wear.

Unless abused or tampered with, most all the other Colt parts are pretty durable.
 

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I have a older custom shop Python that is slightly out of time. If you pull the hammer back slowly the cylinder does not drop in until you start to pull the trigger. If you pull the hammer back fast like you normaly would it drops in place. Is this something I should be concerned about. It has a fantastic double action triggger,not much hevier then in single action.


westendg
 

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It IS out of time.
However, it's safe to fire AS LONG as you make sure it is locked up when shooting it.

Eventually, you'll need to get this repaired, so I always recommend sooner rather than later.
Also, it's getting harder to find Python repairmen and more expensive.

I recommend send it in to Colt for a proper repair.
This could be as simple as refitting the hand to possibly replacing the hand.
 

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dfaris is right, get it fixed sooner than later. I would even advise to refrain from shooting it until it is repaired to avoid possible finish damage. My most recent Python, a nickel plated '73 beauty was nearly mint when I bought it. The action was stiff and dry but after a few drops of CLP into the frame from the hammer opening the gun seemed to operate smoothly. Anyhow when the hammer was pulled back slowly the bolt was resting in the cylinder notches just before the hammer was all the way back so I assumed all was ok. Turns out after shooting a box of .357s at the range that the bolt never touched the lead in groove, instead it stayed down until the notches on the cylinder passed directly over the bolt and then the bolt would drop into the notches. Sometimes right into the notches and other times to the outside edge of the notch and then it would slide back into the notch, chipping the nickel plating and slightly burring the metal of the cylinder as it did so. I just today got the gun back from Colt and they did a fantastic job of correcting the timing and they did a great job of refinishing the cylinder in nickel for me as well. They warned me that they wouldn't be able to do anything about the marred cylinder notch edges but they did such a good job the burrs are almost unnoticable. What little remains serves to remind me to REALLY check the action good and if I buy another Python down the road and the timing isn't perfect (I now have two Pythons that have been retimed by Colt to perfection so I know what to look for) I'll have it corrected before I shoot it.
 
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