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Yeah sorry. The photo I took shows the bottom but it won’t show on the site. You actually can’t read any of the numbers On the bottom anyways as it looks like something had been hitting it or something there. Thank you for the info though. It is neat see that. So when would this most likely have been made? Sorry to ask another question but would these have been blued at one time and then parkerized? The lettering is so clear is what I am asking. It looks original.
The Government Model pistols themselves had been manufactured and put into inventory, with some probably dated back to 1937 and some as late as 1942. Colt started transferring the Government Model pistols into the military contract in October of 1942.

The original finish was the beautiful Colt oven blue, but with the original serial number removal they were sandblasted and given a military phosphate (Parkerized) finish.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
Thank you again for all the additional info. I enjoy learning about the different guns that I pick up. I have my original boxed 80 series gold cup national match that was my first large caliber hand gun. I believe I was around 18 when I got it new. I truly feel the 1911 was the best hand gun made. I also purchased a Colt sp1 in the box about that same time which I still have.
 

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Thank you again for all the additional info. I enjoy learning about the different guns that I pick up.
Greenhummer1,

Here's what your COLT Slide looked like when sitting on a shelf at COLT in the early 1940s. (The pictured Pistol is in the C 197XXX range.)

The Pistol, with your slide, was one of over 6,575 Government Models (GM) in inventory, at COLT, for sale (in the early 1940s). Shortly after December 7, 1941, COLT suspended production of Commercial GM Pistols. In October 1942, COLT transferred 6,575 unsold Commercial GM Pistols to the existing COLT Military contract (Clawson). For these Commercial/Military Pistols, COLT removed the Swartz Safety parts, peened (flat) the Government Model roll stamp and the GM serial number (C XXXXXX), and also peened out the serial number under the Firing Pin Stop on the Slide. COLT then made these GM Pistols into M1911A1 Pistols for their Military contract and renumbered them,..."almost all of these pistols are in the serial range No 860003 to about No 866675." (Clawson)

Most likely, your Slide is from one of these Commercial/Military Pistols.

Best Regards,
two 38's & trivia 124-3.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Thank you for the information. That is a beautiful 1911. With that information I could see how the stamping for the serial number may not be very good.
 

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Hey Y’all,

In the interest of education, below are a few photographs of my Colt Commercial to Military conversion 1911A1 pistol. There is an overall view of each side of the pistol and close up views of the two areas with the serial number stamping. You can see where the original commercial markings were peened out and the military format numbers added. If you look closely at the numbers under the firing pin stop, I believe you can see remnants of the original numbers. I think these are very interesting pistols from a very important time in the US history of WWII.

Best!
Tom





 

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Colt got approval from the Ordnance Department to convert some finished commercial pistols in late 1942. Those pistols were transferred with original commercial SN# removed and re-stamp with assigned military SN#. That's why your slide demonstrate the removal of original numbers and reapply new numbers on top. Total 6,575 commercial Government Model pistols were converted.
 

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That looks really nice. Can’t quite figure why mine is so buggered up at the serial number. So the way I understand something I read was that the Swartz safety was probably removed at the military?
Kind of looks like dry firing without the firing pin stop in place(?).
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Hey Y’all,

In the interest of education, below are a few photographs of my Colt Commercial to Military conversion 1911A1 pistol. There is an overall view of each side of the pistol and close up views of the two areas with the serial number stamping. You can see where the original commercial markings were peened out and the military format numbers added. If you look closely at the numbers under the firing pin stop, I believe you can see remnants of the original numbers. I think these are very interesting pistols from a very important time in the US history of WWII.

Best!
Tom





This sure looks better on the serial number than mine. Can’t even read the last 3 numbers but the first three appear to be in that group of guns which is fun to see.
 
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