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Discussion Starter #1
At this time I'm going to say yes but much more research is required. Points that make be believe it's rare and NOT part of the run of 1000 Civilian model 1917 45 ACP's.

My gun has the following:

1) Gun is serialed as a 1926

2 ) The patents on this gun are: Aug 5, 1884; June 5, 1990 and July 4, 1905

3) The left of the straight barrel says "NEW SERVICE 45 COLT". The seller told me that Colt had no stamping dies so Colt roll marked the stamping. The stamping is a deep impression.

4) Gun has the shortened cylinder for 45 ACP

5) Gun has the lanyard swivel

6) Gun has the later checkered walnut stocks which I believe are correct as early transitional stocks over about a 4 year period beginning around 1926

7) Gun has a square cylinder latch

The run of 1000 has the following:

1) The entire run of 1000 is serialed between 335000 & 336000. Manufactured in 1932 and sold in 1933.

2) The patents on are: Aug 5, 1884; July 4, 1905 and Oct 5, 1926

3) The left side of the barrel says "COLT MODEL 1917 .45 AUTO CTGE"

4) Gun does not have the lanyard swivel

5) The checkered walnut stocks would be correct for this date.

6) Gun has a round cylinder latch
 

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Hi Addicted,
Sorry I missed the first description you posted. I am in Nevada right now and won't be back in California (Where all my gun reference material is) until Friday night. I will be glad to check then for you.
I pulled out a couple of my New Services that I keep here in NV and here are a couple things you can check on your gun to see if it looks correct.

Check to see if the number on the frame in the crane cutout matches the number on the inside of the crane. Both should be the same. Look at the cylinder and see if there are any numbers or there stampings on the rear face. If there are numbers, they should match the number found inside the crane cutout on the frame. (It may just be the last three digits IF there are any numbers present at all. Look to see if any other markings/stampings are present on the cylinders. If, so... check to see if they are military inspectors and or proof markings.

It was a fairly common conversion to change the .45 Colt cylinder and add a Model 1917 cylinder to shoot .45 acp ammo. Most gun smiths didn't bother to remark the barrel caliber. I've seen several of them.

Can you post some pictures of your gun? The finish color might tell you if it is original also. The prewar finish on the New Service is a deep Blue Black color... Also, a Colt letter would tell you for sure...

I'll look further when I get back to California...
Hope that helps... Bob Best
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Bob, Thank you for the knowledgable response. I have matching numbers on the crane/frame. The standard stampings located at the front and rear bows located on the left side. Also the barrel stampings that I indicated earlier. No other stampings. I have located all 7 stampings on both of my Smith Triple Lock Targets. If the stampings were there on this New Service I feel they would have been found.

I removed the stocks and there is a serial number marked in pencil that dates to 1920. These stocks did not exist in 1920. Why would someone pencil that number on these stocks? It's 313745 and it's penciled on both halves.

Newbies, For those that want to know what a un-finished gun looks like take a look at these photos. Notice how sharp the edges are. The edges are the sharpest I've ever seen. Use the reflection of the lighting. Notice how straight the reflection is? A refinished gun will have a wavy reflection and the light appears to come around the edge. Simular to the appearance of the front of this cylinder. The sharp edge will be burred rounded at that location from the factory.

Here's the pics. The left side barrel marking holds the rarity key to this gun. And that it was manfactured 6 years before the run of 1000 places this gun in it's own catagory. I look forward to responses.



 

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It seems to me that comparisons with the "Civilian" Models 1917 are irrelevant. This gun is clearly not a "Civilian" Model 1917.

I have never seen New Service stocks like those pictured. I would speculate that they are handmade replacements with Colt medallions, or aftermarket stocks to which someone has added medallions. (Are the medallions really gold color, or it is my poor eyesight or the picture? A Pre-War medallion should be the stamped silver variety, rather than the cast Post-War style.) Lately, there are lots of "created" Colt stocks showing up on eBay, where someone has added medallions to repalcement ivory and pearl stocks. The stocks on this NS may be an early version of such stocks. The screw and metal socket do look correct however. Perhaps the screw and socket are also originals used with replacement wood. The other possibility is that the stocks are plain M1917 stocks that have been skillfully checkered in the non-original style shown, and medallions added. The finish on the stocks clearly does not look original.

I think Colt made repacement wood stocks for the NS after WWII (maybe to replace worn stocks when doing factory refinishes), since I have seen a set that has the big-headed blue screw (with no metal screw socket in the head side of the stocks) as seen on wood stocks of the Post-War era, as opposed to the small-headed nickel screws of the Pre-War era that use the metal socket in the head side of the stocks. The stocks on this NS appear to have the Pre-War style of screw and metal socket, but that is the only thing about them that looks correct.

Bob Murphy's book does mention a few guns in the non-catalog chambering of .45ACP with 5.5-inch barrels in the 324,000-325,000 range, with the barrels marked "NEW SERVICE 45 COLT." Perhaps Addicted gun is one of these with replacement stocks. A letter is needed.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Check out this gun on auction. It's appears to be the same as mine. Notice that the 1st 3 serial number digits match and the stocks appear to be the same. I'm trying to get better pics from the seller.

The stocks appear the same to me
 

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I would agree with JC that you have a "rare" 1926 .45 ACP with stocks of unknown parentage. It would be interesting to see if anyone else has seen that type of stock on a N.S. - with the checkering ending below the medallion and rounded border at the bottom; I haven't. Dig 'em out, guys.

Addicted, keep us posted...
 

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Hi Addicted,
I'd say that your New Sevice is indeed one of the "uncataloged" .45 acp models in the 324xxx to 325xxx serial number range. Your frame appears to have the wide cylinder stop milled on the frame that is required with the shorter 45 acp cylinder ... Good find! Can't comment on the grips other than to say I have not seen any like yours and there doesn't appear to be any photos of guns with grips like yours in Murphy's book. Nice Gun! Bob Best
 
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