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This cylinder has appearance of a long flute cylinder. I put it in my 1st G and it cycles properly. It is definitely old/used but the ratchet looks like a 3rd G. Also, the flutes don't appear quite as long as pictures Ive seen. What say others? THANKS IMG_3006.jpg IMG_3008.jpg IMG_3009.jpg
 

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This cylinder has appearance of a long flute cylinder. I put it in my 1st G and it cycles properly. It is definitely old/used but the ratchet looks like a 3rd G. Also, the flutes don't appear quite as long as pictures Ive seen. What say others? THANKS View attachment 657073 View attachment 657075 View attachment 657077
Original long flute cylinders came from the Colt M1878 DA's. These cylinders are different from the normal Colt SAA, with more than just "long flutes". The cylinder pin bushing is inserted from the front, but only goes in about 1". The ratchet has a short integral bushing that almost touches the other bushing. The ratchet is also "keyed"so that rotation is impossible. That key slides into a slot in the cylinder, which is cut into the bushing hole. Thus, looking from the rear of the cylinder, no bushing is apparent. But if one looks through the bushing, the joint can be seen between the two sections.

What you have appears to be an original long flute cylinder, as used on Colt SAA's numbered 330000 to 331480 (plus a few outside this range).

Cylinder shown below is from #331143. Your flute may look shorter, but I can see that a great deal of polishing has been done on your cylinder, and that will "shorten" the back end of your flutes.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
yes, the bushing is short and as you look thru the bushing there is a joint where it meets the keyed ratchet. Should one be able to remove the short bushing inserted from front or is it pressed in secured like 3rd G. ??
 

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yes, the bushing is short and as you look thru the bushing there is a joint where it meets the keyed ratchet. Should one be able to remove the short bushing inserted from front or is it pressed in secured like 3rd G. ??
Originally the short bushing was loose, and would nearly fall out of the front of the cylinder. If the short bushing is stuck, there are two ways to remove it. When new, that bushing was flared outward at the front end. I made a two-piece "puller" out of brass. When both halves of this puller are in place, those halves are then c-clamped tightly together. This simply provides a temporary plug for that bushing, so that it can be punched out from the ratchet end. No damage is done to the bushing, when removed in this manner.

But if that original flared end has worn away (leaving forward-backward movement of the cylinder), there is a simple destructive way to remove the worn bushing. The hole in that bushing measures 1/4" in diameter. Use a 5/16 x 18 tap and tap the front end of that bushing, then insert a short 5/16 x 18 screw to plug the end. Drive out the bushing as before. That destroys the original bushing, but it needs replacing anyway. A standard 1st or 2nd Gen bushing can be shortened in a lathe to replace the old one.

Of course, once the front bushing has been removed, then the ratchet-bushing section can be driven out too, if desired. Always do the punch-out with an undersized brass punch. I buy 1/4" brass welding rod stock to make all kinds of soft punches, sight drifts, etc. One brass welding (brazing) rod is 36" long.
 

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Actually Vic, you can run the bolt through a deep well socket then into the bushing and using a ratchet it will pull the bushing out without trying to drive it out. Less effort and less room for error.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Originally the short bushing was loose, and would nearly fall out of the front of the cylinder. If the short bushing is stuck, there are two ways to remove it. When new, that bushing was flared outward at the front end. I made a two-piece "puller" out of brass. When both halves of this puller are in place, those halves are then c-clamped tightly together. This simply provides a temporary plug for that bushing, so that it can be punched out from the ratchet end. No damage is done to the bushing, when removed in this manner.

But if that original flared end has worn away (leaving forward-backward movement of the cylinder), there is a simple destructive way to remove the worn bushing. The hole in that bushing measures 1/4" in diameter. Use a 5/16 x 18 tap and tap the front end of that bushing, then insert a short 5/16 x 18 screw to plug the end. Drive out the bushing as before. That destroys the original bushing, but it needs replacing anyway. A standard 1st or 2nd Gen bushing can be shortened in a lathe to replace the old one.

Of course, once the front bushing has been removed, then the ratchet-bushing section can be driven out too, if desired. Always do the punch-out with an undersized brass punch. I buy 1/4" brass welding rod stock to make all kinds of soft punches, sight drifts, etc. One brass welding (brazing) rod is 36" long.
Well, I got tired of thinking about that stuck bushing. Was concerned ruining the cylinder but decided to try to remove it following victorio 1sw suggestion anyway. It worked! I was surprised how hard/stuck that bushing was as it took numerous hard hits with a hammer to drive it out from the ratchet end. The inside of the bushing hole is in good shape. So know I need a new short bushing. I can buy a new short bushing for $44 but am concerned it may be a fraction too long (old bushing shaft is .9806") requiring some minor shortening (seen references to new bushings being 1.0"). So maybe I should find a machine shop to shorten the long bushing I have but am wondering how much that would cost compared to the $44 new bushing that I may have to adjust/shorten slightly anyway. THOUGHTS? IMG_3574.jpg IMG_3575.jpg IMG_3576.jpg IMG_3577.jpg
 

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The font of the numbers on the back of the cylinder aren't typical colt sized numbers compared to what I have seen.
 
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