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Discussion Starter #41
Wow, I looked at the Barons web page. Absolutely beautiful work. I shall do an inquiry and see if it will be within my means.

I agree about enjoying your firearms. I do have a few unfired pieces, but I would much rather have one that I can shoot with my family/friends and appreciate the fine workmanship.

bsmalley23, it is a true pity that we everyday lose talented skillsets in every discipline.

I grew up on the Outer Banks, on a little island called Harkers Island- it is near Cape Lookout and Shackleford Banks. (Wild ponies).

Well, the Outer Banks area has been known for beautifully-built boats and the boatbuilders used to be plentiful. But it is a tough trade and the profit margins for average builders is not high. So when I was young many of the sons of the multi-generation builders decided they didn't want to build boats and so they pursued other interests.
Their grandfathers (master boatwrights) who built distinctive flare bow fishing, party and workboats passed away without sharing their knowledge and eventually the same happened to their own fathers. Now there exists only a handful of people who can build (and repair) the quality boats of yesterday and today. Some of the last families are hanging on, but many of the last master boatbuilders are getting up in age.

So now we live in Facebook world. One of the top ten most "valuable" companies produces no product, provides no tangible benefit (except to those who buy and utilize your personal data), and Zuck is proclaimed a higher savior than the most talented master craftsman.
 

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Having acquired my Diamondback earlier this year, and enjoying shooting it, my main concern has been the longevity of it. I paid a good price for it, but still way more than any similar pistol would have been from any other maker (same era, style & caliber). I have since gone on to add an S&W and Ruger to my collection, but will not likely add another Colt unless it just happens to be a deal that is too good to pass up. The reason isn't because I wouldn't like to own a Python, DS or even Trooper, it's because I would feel like I'm sinking money into something that I will only be able to enjoy on a limited basis with the nagging notion that I won't be able to get it back to working condition if it fails. If more are like me, then I can see this being a turning point in the market for Colt. Maybe they are over priced, I tend to think they are, especially because of this situation. They deserve some of the prestige they have over other makes of guns, but not 3x or more (compare a Python at $3k to any similar S&W at $1k, or DS at $1200-1500 to a J-frame at $400-500).

This is bad news for those who have over invested in these guns I think, but may be good news for those who might want to expand their collection. I don't think it will increase the prices, and will more likely decrease them.
I totally agree, and expect values to go down from here. Why wouldn't they, with no manufacturer support?! basically they are being reduced to relics to put it bluntly.
 

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Manufacturer support has never been a consideration for ownership.

Some refuse to accept the fact that these so-called 'Snake Guns' were never designed as objects of worship - to sit on silken pillows and be covered in Renaissance Wax - they were robust and accurate sidearms designed for the holsters of hunters and law enforcers and folks needing a weapon they could trust when things went pear-shaped.

Guess what?

They're 'still' the same weapon...

They were well-built when new, and most will never see more than a few hundred rounds pushed through them, unless they carry professionally and qualify or compete, and since PPC faded and IPSC never really saw serious revolver usage, the 'round count' so beloved by those who can't imagine a visible indicator of deterioration becomes moot.

Maybe when 'The Walking Dead' finally kills the last 'walker' - or one finally kills 'Rick' - the cult-like devotion will wane, but don't bet on it.

If it's 'out of production', it's collectable, and that fact will always pull serious money out of wallets.
 

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I am shooting my colts, all 100 of them I consider my shooters. Of course I have the Jerry K shop manual, a couple of spare hands and mainsprings.
Sad indeed that this service is no longer provided. I guess it means we are all just getting older. But no one has to tell me to act my age.
 

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"Age is all mind over matter...if you don't mind it doesn't matter."...attributed to Jack Benny

"A man is only as old as the woman he feels."...Groucho Marx
 

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If you're the type who digs deeper into your weapon, then a few new screws are a good idea, as well - a burred screw head's a visible indicator of poor maintenance.
 

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I am guessing I must have 60 of the D, E, and I frame guns along with 6 or 7 new service variations. I have maybe stretched 10 hands and broke 1 hand in the process. I believe I have 4 extra E/I frame hands and a 1 d frame hand. I may never use them. All of those guns were bought used. I believe for most here, you can just shoot and use your gun without worry. If we all felt we needed a spare part, it would be using parts that others really need. The only Colt firing pin I have ever replaced was the 2 piece unit of a 1903 pocket 32 auto.
 

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I'm not sure if I'm in the minority, but I've broken a Python firing pin. Fairly easy to replace. Are there any difference between the Factory original hands or the reproduction jack first ones?

I am guessing I must have 60 of the D, E, and I frame guns along with 6 or 7 new service variations. I have maybe stretched 10 hands and broke 1 hand in the process. I believe I have 4 extra E/I frame hands and a 1 d frame hand. I may never use them. All of those guns were bought used. I believe for most here, you can just shoot and use your gun without worry. If we all felt we needed a spare part, it would be using parts that others really need. The only Colt firing pin I have ever replaced was the 2 piece unit of a 1903 pocket 32 auto.
 

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I was a COLT Warranty Gunsmith for many years.
When I retired there were many others around.
Most of us older guys can no longer do the work and had little or no success in training others.
My shop was sold to employees who didn't seem to want to get their hands dirty. They continued the Police Equipment business, but no repair work.
I have seen some of the modern replacement parts.
They are good for those who will learn how to properly fit them.
The parts we received from the factory had changed dramatically through the years. Parts used to come to us in semi finished shape and we fitted and adjusted them as was done in Hartford.
Slowly parts started to come in with more finishing already done. in the late 1980's and early 1990's the majority of the new parts ( rebound levers, bolts, hands, hammers and triggers ) were prepared for final fitting.
The age of closer machining had come to force.
However, the current crop of "gunsmiths" seem to be parts replacing people and not truly interested in fine work.
Does Gunsmithing have to die out?
I hope not!
Surely the financial rewards and personal satisfaction in a job well done still survive here in the Greatest Country in the World.
 

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Surely the financial rewards and personal satisfaction in a job well done still survive here in the Greatest Country in the World.
That is the main reason I am learning myself. Financial rewards and personal satisfaction.

There is almost no better feeling than fixing, tuning, and honing your Colt to a quality well above the norm. You know exactly how it runs, why it runs like that, and what to do if something is amiss. You can make it perfect to suit your personal preference.

It is kind of like doing all the remodeling on your home, which I do also, you can rest assured knowing exactly what was done and the quality of it. You have no fears down the road that problems may arise because you had someone else do it without knowledge of what exactly they did or how.

Kind of like the saying "if you want it done right, you gotta do it yourself".
 

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That is the main reason I am learning myself. Financial rewards and personal satisfaction.

There is almost no better feeling than fixing, tuning, and honing your Colt to a quality well above the norm. You know exactly how it runs, why it runs like that, and what to do if something is amiss. You can make it perfect to suit your personal preference.

It is kind of like doing all the remodeling on your home, which I do also, you can rest assured knowing exactly what was done and the quality of it. You have no fears down the road that problems may arise because you had someone else do it without knowledge of what exactly they did or how.

Kind of like the saying "if you want it done right, you gotta do it yourself".
Absolutely, and this is why I got into gunsmithing in the first place. I'm mostly into the C&R guns, and I couldn't find anybody who knew how to work on even the simplest ones. Afterwhile I realized that most of the guys calling themselves "gunsmiths" were actually assembling AR-15s or AK-47s, mounting scopes and such. After a hack screwed up an FN 1922 for me, I decided to roll up my sleeves and learn as much as I possibly could about gunsmithing. It has actually become kind of an obsession, there is always something else to try, always another tool to buy etc, but hey: I can play with guns all day long and even get paid for it. ;)
 

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Great work done on Pythons by members of the American Pistolsmiths Guild. My smith specializes in Colt and S&W revolvers and has kept my Pythons running great for years.
rmc
 
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