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I really can't even guess what the market will be in the future for ivory. I don't believe there is another product to compare it with to give a good idea. So the question will be headed in multiple directions for the future.

Who can legally buy it ? (NFA comes to mind here)

Who will buy it? ( Like NFA there are buyers willing to pay the price if the price is right)

How many can afford it? Price goes up means fewer buyers.

Last question, with the debt growing over 22 trillion what will that do to the cost of things in the future.

The market for every collection has these same questions to be asked, ivory is now a collectable.

Jim
 

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Me personally, I don’t buy it simply because it’s far to restrictive to resell if I wanted to ever sell it (or my family). Not worth the headache researching federal and individual state laws, or paying a lawyer.
My thoughts as well. I've never handled ivory grips so maybe I'm missing out on something but it just doesn't seem worth it.
 

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There is a reason some of the most valued weapons in the last 2000+ years have often had ivory handles. Ivory offers a superior grip when wet and is neutral when it comes to heat and cold. Handy on a knife or sword and handy on a SAA. And ivory compared to many natural materials is easy to work and often more durable by comparison. The tradition of ivory use on weapons goes back to the Bronze age.

When it comes to a Colt product, Sam Colt started offering pearl and ivory grips (along with wood) almost from the very beginning of his hand gun production. The 1837 Patterson were the first examples of a Colt handgun with ivory and mother of pearl grips. Just as high valued hand guns were offered with ivory and pearl fully 100 years before Sam Colt was born.



Besides the distinct advantages of ivory (or to lessor extend Mother of pearl) as a grip material it is a very traditional grip on any Colt firearm. And sure the newest Resin-S is close, as is Micarta, similar to ivory, superior in fact by some measures, but neither is actually elephant ivory. Any one suggesting other wise is truly clueless.

While it my not be politically correct these days to use ivory or pearl, it is no longer politically correct to be a gun owner either. One might want to reflect on that connection for a moment prior to moving on. For various reasons 30 round mags are bad, ARs are bad, ivory is bad. And Pearl? No one thought a big clam in the Pacific was cute enough to be worth saving?! Sure the elephants are cute. Dead elephants are not a pretty picture to explain away. Neither are whales or finless sharks. I get it.

For those that have never held an ivory handled weapon of any sort I can only say, yes, you are missing some thing. May be best missed by most. Ivory is not just a cosmetic enhancement for a Colt or a knife for that matter. Hard for me to fathom an interest in a SAA and not have an interest in the actual history of the firearm. Because that is all a SAA is, is history.

I'd rather have elephants running wild in my world than any of the ivory I own. But I am also pretty realistic and informed on how the ivory came to me and the actual reasons the elephant population is plummeting, and now the Giraffe population as well and the large shells prior in a devastated ocean world wide.

Back on point. Ivory will continue to rise in price slowly if ownership isn't just out right banned in the near future. I'd guess that ban is coming in time, no matter who is in the white house. Those that have never used ivory will never know what the advantages or beauty of ivory are. And the uneducated will continue to think that the limited bans on importation and transportation here in the USA will make a significant difference in the world wide elephant population.
 

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The sadest part of this is the indigenous people that could benefit tremendously from the responsible managment of THEIR resource. If the Elephant is rendered invaluable, it becomes a 6 ton varmint that lives 70 years, has no natural enemies and eats wherever he wants.

PS. Unless their classification has changed, African Elephants are not on the endangered list.
 

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I don't doubt the African Elephant is endangered and very "Vulnerable" to extinction even in our life times. (what is left of our life times ;)

I have friends that live and work in Africa and keep a pretty close tab ( as many try to) on the Elephant populations in as many countries. Having a healthy Elephant population is part of their livelihood so it is important to them. First and foremost the biggest threat they see is poaching that is state sponsored and out sourced to China (mostly), SE Asian and Japan. China is the biggest consumer of illegal ivory by anyone's measure. And with a growing and more affluent society by the day, with a long heritage of ivory use, that isn't going to slow down without some serious conservation efforts. Stop! End of story there.

I don't like what we have for ivory laws now, but I'd also like to have wild elephants around for the next 100 years which seems totally unrealistic by what we have see in the last 100 years. So I don't think it is "weasel words" or even close.

I would have thought that anyone invested in the use (personal or professional) of ivory would take more time to educate themselves as to what the real dangers to ivory and the Elephant that just labeling the World Wild Life Federation info as "weasel words". Chit like that reminds me of anti gunners telling us all that "those assault weapons" are dangerous. And you have no need. But the same comments...are just pure propaganda and do none of us any good.

There is a place in our society for the AK and the AR. And I think there is a place in our society for a managed resource that is a source of new ivory is as well.

But guaranteed......if we keep ignoring the facts there won't be any elephants left. No elephants...it is simple...no new ivory.

But humans are a greedy lot. We still have the estimated 150 million mammoths buried in the frozen Siberian tundra alone. Plus what there is likely in Alaska and Canada. No one will hardly notice the elephant is gone. (except the Africans) There will still be plenty of ivory to go around.
 

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The money from the sale of their ivory could be used to manage the herds and keep them healthy. Stop the illegal killing for the ivory by making ivory be registered to be sold. Yep it would all be difficult but what's going to happen in my opinion is the herds will be neglected and their numbers dwindle. I think it wrong to take the money out of the ivory trade, the money just ends up in the wrong hands. We can do better.
 

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https://thediplomat.com/2019/03/chinas-ivory-ban-a-work-in-progress/

"In China, ivory is seen as status symbol. The raw tusks that are brought into China are usually turned into anything from Buddhist statues to chopsticks. With the rampant rise in demand for ivory after 2008, Tanzania saw their elephant population decrease from 110,000 wild elephants in 2009 to a depressing 44,000 in 2014. Yang Fenglan is believed to be responsible for at least 400 of those deaths. As an animal with a gestational period of 22 months, growing elephant populations is incredibly difficult."

I don't know anything about the ivory trade but banning hunting and burning ivory sized from poachers does not seem like it will help- rather use the money from legal hunting and sized ivory to fight the illegal ivory trade. Some new reports say the loss of dollars from legal managed hunting, contributed to more poaching and less elephants.
 

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The money from the sale of their ivory could be used to manage the herds and keep them healthy. Stop the illegal killing for the ivory by making ivory be registered to be sold. Yep it would all be difficult but what's going to happen in my opinion is the herds will be neglected and their numbers dwindle. I think it wrong to take the money out of the ivory trade, the money just ends up in the wrong hands. We can do better.
And don't forget, if the Elephants are worth a bunch of money to the natives, that's a strong motivator to keep individual animals safe and the heard healthy and growing. Makes too much sense for government work.:bang_wall:
 

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Besides the obvious poaching and China's influence...you have to get the local governments and local populations on board wanted a long term viable resource. No one said it was easy.

But it aint a crew of Chinese mercenaries doing the poaching. It may be China that is paying for and importing the ivory at a distance but it is in general locals that do the poaching. And Government officials still profiting from the illegal sales. Until you get all the locals on board and thinking that elephants are a good thing for the local population the Elephant is "gone".

Think of it this way. If you raised cattle on a 10,000 acres of open range and everyone from your neighbors, to the local and state Governments thought it was OK to drop by and butcher a beef or two without asking any time they wanted. Then come the 4th of July and Christmas and some one else wanted to throw a party (and BBQing your beef). How long would your herd last?
 

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Coz don't go to China- Bu Hao! lots of bad stuff going on there now. Hong Kong would have been OK prior to the 'revolt' but no more good place to stay out of..




https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B9VrW3I8SqU

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kekexili:_Mountain_Patrol

Here is a very good movie about anti poaching action in Asia protecting not the Asian elephant but the Tibetan Antelope Chiru. Its a outstanding film about some tough as hell Tibetans- working against poaching- Its a kind of a hard corps Tibetan western. The name is "Mountain Patrol". Outstanding movie made before the Chicoms sawed the legs off the Hong Kong and Mainland dissident film industry- recommend it highly probly can get it off netflixs if anyone is interested. Link has spoilers. The trailor is hokey and does not do the film justice its damn good.

 

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What other exotic materials used in firearms and knives are at risk of disappearing ?
 

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From what I can tell from conversations with folks in the know......mother of pearl is basically done. The size needed to make stocks just doesn’t exist any more. Believe me. I’ve been trying......
 
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