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I want to fill in repair this chip on ivory grip. Any suggestions on best/matching product to use? THANKS IMG_3706.jpg IMG_3707.jpg
 

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I want to fill in repair this chip on ivory grip. Any suggestions on best/matching product to use? THANKS View attachment 682863 View attachment 682865
Hey would a slurry of ivory dust and some good two part glue work the best to match the color you have?
I do this with woodworking and really works well
You would have to sand the backs a little to get ample ivory dust to mix with your glue/epoxy solution
I am not sure what is best on Ivory
God Bless,John
But it should give you the correct color as long as u start with clear stuff

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I had a set that chipped like that, I got a piece of scrap Ivory {knife makers have scrap pieces}and shaped it to size then sanded both pieces flat where they come to gather and then super glued them. You might want to stain the small piece so it will match and blend in...……………………………………….M*
 

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I agree with Ringo. 2 part clear resin with a long cure time, and lots of ivory dust is the simplest fix. You would need to drill shallow, angled holes to create "keyways", in order to keep the resin from popping off. You can expect this fix to yellow at a different rate than the grip. Might try layering old piano key ivory, or ivory from broken grips (LGS?), using superglue as Mblhopo suggested. Hard to fit those pieces, though. In the "not very likely category", dental filling might work well. Know any dentists well enough to ask?
 

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If by using some tape you can create a 'dam' that encloses the damaged area, you can pack in dry ivory from sanding as jringo suggested and after the ivory dust has filled in the damaged area you can rapidly add low density superglue to that dammed section. The superglue will extremely rapidly infiltrate the powder by capillary action forming a very hardened, well bonded area to the grips. After a few minutes cure time, you can sand the repaired area.
Believe me when I say that low density superglue will create a much tougher and durable composite than will any two part epoxy. The two part epoxies are so viscous that one gets very poor wet-out of the ivory dust particles which results in a weak repair.
I believe that it was Swamprat (God rest his soul) who explained this some time ago. He said this process also works very well for repairing damaged pearl.
 

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If by using some tape you can create a 'dam' that encloses the damaged area, you can pack in dry ivory from sanding as jringo suggested and after the ivory dust has filled in the damaged area you can rapidly add low density superglue to that dammed section. The superglue will extremely rapidly infiltrate the powder by capillary action forming a very hardened, well bonded area to the grips. After a few minutes cure time, you can sand the repaired area.
Believe me when I say that low density superglue will create a much tougher and durable composite than will any two part epoxy. The two part epoxies are so viscous that one gets very poor wet-out of the ivory dust particles which results in a weak repair.
I believe that it was Swamprat (God rest his soul) who explained this some time ago. He said this process also works very well for repairing damaged pearl.
Well thank you my friend slipped my mind about the superglue
Sure miss Hugh Clark
Great friend and great man
God Bless,John

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jringo, The major negative regarding the superglue process is that once the superglue wets out the ivory powder, the mass sets up almost instantaneously. The epoxy/ivory powder process allows you time to work with the mixture before it sets up. There are pros and cons to both processes, but I like the hardness, toughness and adhesive properties of the composite material that results from the superglue process.
 

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You may want to check with your dentist.
Those people fix stuff like that all the time, only inside somebody's mouth.
BINGO! Dentists have some sort of polymer that can be matched to a chart, mixed for a specific color match and hardened with UV light. That said, if you need some scrap ivory to try, PM me and I'll send you some. Of course I can't sell it:bang_wall: but there's no law about giving it away!
 

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BINGO! Dentists have some sort of polymer that can be matched to a chart, mixed for a specific color match and hardened with UV light. That said, if you need some scrap ivory to try, PM me and I'll send you some. Of course I can't sell it:bang_wall: but there's no law about giving it away!
I can't remember , I thought I read a line about sale and transport across state lines or was it sale or transport across state lines .
 

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I recently used the two-part epoxy/ivory dust method to repair a chip out of a one-piece ivory stock from one of my engraved SAA's. It worked very well and I am quite happy with it. Actually I am surprised that it worked so well (or maybe by the fact that I could do it at all!). I bought couple of pounds of scrap ivory pieces from Nutmeg about ten years ago and they have come in handy several times.
- -Bruce
 

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I have heard that ivory dust mixed with epoxy winds up as a gray color. I dont know. Check out this video of superglue and baking soda used to repair ivory guitar nuts. I have no idea how well it holds up.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=slCMkvEfK_U
Outstanding video. Superglue and any solid powder seems to work very well. I have used wood filings and superglue; carbon black and superglue; gutta percha powder and superglue; ivory powder and superglue; pearl powder (very bad to breathe) and superglue. All work very well for strong, lasting repairs.
 

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You may want to check with your dentist.
Those people fix stuff like that all the time, only inside somebody's mouth.
Ditto. Did you ever have a filling on the front surface of one of your front teeth? The dentist uses a two part epoxy to match the tooth color. The dentist uses a UV light to cure but it will cure overnight without the light. I had a chip out of my giraffe bone grips and the Doc gave a me selection of different color epoxies to fix it. Nothing easier to find a match, plenty of working time and the stuff is tough.
 

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Good morning Norwich, How is the progress ? I hate to see this post just get buried . Do you have a picture of experimental progress? What is the best try ? If I seen to be nosey , YES . Take care .
 

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Many of us own and use stuff with ivory. Anyone of us might need ivory repair in the future so yes lab results would be great.
 
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