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Another one intended as a reply but decided it has wider application --

Ivory vs. bone; I don't recognize much practical difference between them other than availability, cost & color. Ivory is pretty consistent in quality, density & color, while bone can vary, so I'm comparing best bone --


Buffalo bone on my Son's Kimber project I would prefer to ivory. Working very much like ivory, DIY snake plus synthetic rubies @ 30 cents & the bone $30 bone grips ---->
 

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They look nice. Where did you get the bone?
 
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You can get bone from your local butcher. Ask for a couple of beef soup bones that are uncut, bring them home and make some soup. After you have had your dinner, process the bones by boiling them in a mild sulfuric acid (I think it is sulfuric acid) that dissolves the fats and such out. This stuff will float to the top and you can save that "dross" for making soap. Rinse your bones well and then saw them to shape and fit to your handgun or knife.

OR

Go to your local pet supply store and they have already processed large beef bones for sale so your dog can enjoy them. You can then skip all the soup making and boiling in acid steps but then you don't get any soup. Still have to saw them for use on your firearm or knife. Some also carry nice chunks of elk antler which you might find useful.

OR

You can order all kinds of bone (and horn) from;

Animal Bones for Sale at Atlantic Coral Enterprise

OR;

Check out knife makers supply houses.
 

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Thanks Gazz
 

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Years ago when a boy I got ahold of some fresh sawed off cow horns. I wanted to try my hand at making a powder horn and engraving it. I read to boil the horn. I stunk up mom`s kitchen to where you could smell that horn for a week!
 

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Just to be clear, and safe on the issue of mixing Sulphuric Acid and Water. It's been some time since I etched knife blades with Sulphuric acid. You can indeed mix Sulphuric Acid with water but I cannot remember if you must add the water to the acid, or the acid to the water. One way is extremely dangerous I understand, and I think it is adding Sulphuric Acid to water that's dangerous.

I seem to remember something about never pouring Sulphuric Acid down the drain due to it creating dangerous gases and a resulting explosion. I could be mistaken, but my point in all this is just to raise an awareness that one way is very, very dangerous.

If I am mistaken about this, and someone can correct me, then by all means please do so. I just wouldn't want someone to "mix" it the wrong way and get badly burned, or worse.

Bud


You can get bone from your local butcher. Ask for a couple of beef soup bones that are uncut, bring them home and make some soup. After you have had your dinner, process the bones by boiling them in a mild sulfuric acid (I think it is sulfuric acid) that dissolves the fats and such out. This stuff will float to the top and you can save that "dross" for making soap. Rinse your bones well and then saw them to shape and fit to your handgun or knife.

OR

Go to your local pet supply store and they have already processed large beef bones for sale so your dog can enjoy them. You can then skip all the soup making and boiling in acid steps but then you don't get any soup. Still have to saw them for use on your firearm or knife. Some also carry nice chunks of elk antler which you might find useful.

OR

You can order all kinds of bone (and horn) from;

Animal Bones for Sale at Atlantic Coral Enterprise

OR;

Check out knife makers supply houses.
 

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Add acid to water! Remember it is as alphabetically A before W. When you do add Sulphuric Acid to water, do it very slowly and wear eye protection and a rubber apron if you have one.
 
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