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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
IMG000368.jpg IMG000369.jpg
overall it looks in pretty good condition. A tad of rust and the bluing is a little faded.
First question is: 1) I don't suppose I have the at home tool box means to take the old cylinder off and put the new cylinder on and, by chance, have the bolt be a perfect fit for all six slots? (my Jerry Kuhnhousen books indicates "no" I need a special wrench and know-how to line up the ejector star)

My second and main question is: 2) Is there a way for me to know just how old or what year this cylinder is made? or more to the point, is it made before the 1930ish date that was rated for .38-44 Hi-Speed? It has a five point star stamped on the front of the cylinder and a number "8" Does that tell anyone anything?


How does it look to y'all? the only real working I see on it is in one of the bolt slots that looks to be a little wider



Thanks!
Doug
 

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Colt changed cylinders almost not at all from around 1900 to the 2000's.
Trying to date the era one was made is near impossible. About all you can usually determine is if it's a pre or post war.

The first step is to fit an ejector to the cylinder, then fit the cylinder and ejector assembly to the crane.
There are two types of cranes. The old style has a flange machined on it that the cylinder collar spaces on.
The new style crane has no flange and the cylinder collar spaces against the frame just below the barrel.
Once that's all fitted, then the assembly is fitted to the frame.

It's the ejector that sets head space, and this has to be fitted by using a precision surface grinder to trim the rear of the ejector.
The problem is, a used ejector has already been fitted to a different frame. If the ejector is too short, it's useless because you can't "stretch" it to make it longer.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
soooo, IOW, if my ejector is too short, this cylinder is not good regardless of how good a shape this cylinder is in :(

Well, the cylinder, crane, ejector, etc. are all from the original gun. The Cylinder is the only thing that I'd like to change

I plan on sending it off to Cylinder & Slide and having them take a look at it. But, in light of what you're saying and the fact that one of the cylinder notches looks like it's been worked a little....it almost sounds like this would be a lot of time, effort and money spent for very little gain. In a way almost better off spending a few hundred extra and buying a new used PreWar OP in better overall condition.

The only thing is: I really like this gun. It's my first cartridge loading firearm that I bought on my own. Proud of it and actually enjoy the action and feel of it.
 
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