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Discussion Starter #1
I just put money down on a New Service today! Have to wait till Monday to pick it up. It is in .45 Colt. It has plastic grips with Colt molded in it and has the landyard loop. It is reblued to a highly polished dark blue. I would prefer the original finish but it is not as important to me as the lockup and bore condition. This gun is excellent on both counts. Can't wait to put my handloads of 5.6 grains of Red Dot behind a 250 grain lead rnfp and see what the gun can do. The current .45 Colt bullets I use are sized .452. Will I have to track down .454 bullets? Also, the serial number is 343XXX. Anybody have the born on date?
 

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Way to go McClure! Welcome to the "Big Brawny" owners club.Looks like your N.S. was assembled in 1937 and is what we call,a "late model". These have the rounded cylinder latch(that Colt shoulda put own back in 1908,when they did this on the D & E frames,not wait until 1932!),the "scored lines" and matte finish on the top strap,wider front & rear sights,and Walnut stocks. That plastic stocks are NOT uncommon,and were factory replacements,and even put on some "lunch box" guns,rebuilds,and hand assembled New Services at Hartford after World War 2 and as late as 1954. Try the .452 bullets and many "Cowboy Action bullets are .454(and there are plenty of "on line" places to buy them,plus Hornady & Remington make great Swaged .454s. Depending on your "hold" and hand configuration,you may find that a "grip adapter" will help you.( I just sold my last "spare" one and a set of "correct"rubber Pachmayrs" for a N.Service to a gent on this Forum. Have fun,and let us know how this "real mans gun"(Colt advertising from the 20s & 30s!!) shoots for you. Bud
 

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Welcome to the New Service club! These are great old shooters.

You should know that the pre-WW2 guns have .454" bore diameters and the post-WW2 guns are bored .452". My 1906 New Service actually shoots better with .452" Remington 230 grain FMJ bullets than with lead .452 bullets. The .454" lead bullets generally work best of all, but the practical accuracy difference is pretty minor. Can't tell any difference between any of them when shooting the Bianchi plates at 25 yards. For best results, you should mike the cylinder throats and use a bullet that is as close to the throat diameter as possible (this assumes that you reload your own ammo).

The only real downside to the New Service is the smallish sights. However, the gun's history, mystique, and handling qualities more than make up for this. Be aware that the original plastic grips crack pretty easily and an original un-cracked set will be hard to locate and expensive when you find them. I use Pachmayr Presentation "Colt Army" grips. They've been out of production for several years, but still show up occasionally on Ebay for about $20. There's a rectangular block on the bottom of these grips that can be cut out to allow the grips to be used with the lanyard swivel in place. Ajax grips, as well as several other manufacturers, also makes new grips for the New Service. Enjoy this old warhorse. Colt hasn't made a revolver this good for years.
 

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Welcome to the New Service club! These are great old shooters.

You should know that the pre-WW2 guns have .454" bore diameters and the post-WW2 guns are bored .452". My 1906 New Service actually shoots better with .452" Remington 230 grain FMJ bullets than with lead .452 bullets. The .454" lead bullets generally work best of all, but the practical accuracy difference is pretty minor. Can't tell any difference between any of them when shooting the Bianchi plates at 25 yards. For best results, you should mike the cylinder throats and use a bullet that is as close to the throat diameter as possible (this assumes that you reload your own ammo).

The only real downside to the New Service is the smallish sights. However, the gun's history, mystique, and handling qualities more than make up for this. Be aware that the original plastic grips crack pretty easily and an original un-cracked set will be hard to locate and expensive when you find them. I use Pachmayr Presentation "Colt Army" grips. They've been out of production for several years, but still show up occasionally on Ebay for about $20. There's a rectangular block on the bottom of these grips that can be cut out to allow the grips to be used with the lanyard swivel in place. Ajax grips, as well as several other manufacturers, also makes new grips for the New Service. Enjoy this old warhorse. Colt hasn't made a revolver this good for years.
 

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I use 255 cst swc's in my 1909. No problemas with accuracy. The grip and feel on this great revolver took some getting used to. I figured that since the large bore bullets shot out of the piece were lead this is what is best for the revolver.

I cringe at the thought of seeing some new Service owner use the modern jacketed bullets at high velocities in these old gals
 

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Great to see another New Service fan! They are wonderful old guns and fine examples of the gun maker's art. The care and fitting that went into these old horses was awsome. There is a small paperback by Bob Murphy called "Colt New Service Revolvers" that contains quite a bit of history on them. I would recommend it if you can find one. Here's wishing you many years of enjoyment shooting yours. CC
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Well, I got the gun out on the range and it shoots very good! I used 250 grain handloads sized .452 over some Red Dot. The double action pull was not bad at all. I love the gun! Upon closer inspection, the gun appears to have rubber grips with the large COLT on the top. They could be plastic but they have a bit of a rubber feel to them and a slight green/brown color to them. On the butt of the gun is "GA.S.P." and "No. 82". I assume that this means Georgia State Police. Does anybody know if this police department used the New Service?
 

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Georgia S.P. certainly DID use these! Looks like ya got one! Grips are hard rubber,or "gutta percha". Watch overtightening them;they are prone to crack around the grip screw or locator pin! Enjoy! Bud
 

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Gutta Percha is a type of rubber that was used as an early insulator on wires(1850s)and other uses,that required a "rubber"that would harden,but NOT become brittle like India Rubber(Gutta tree has "latex"fluid like the rubber tree). Only drawback was when it was exposed to direct sunlight for a long time,it tended to shrink! (seen some old SAA Colts have this.) Colt(who also used independent suppliers for some grips,probably had switched over to bakelite,a type of early "plastic" for grips by the early 1900s. Bud
 
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