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Discussion Starter #1
I may have the chance to buy one of these with a serial in the 83xxx range (1897). From the pics seen so far, it appears to be an average gun with traces of blue and no added scope or other alterations. Will try to get pics of the cartouche on the left side of stock.

What is the going price for such a rifle?
 

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A good 1898 can fetch $1000 and 1896s generally will bring a premium on top of that. Records that indicate a military connection will also affect the value.
Condition is everything (as always), plus originality. Many, many bores were thoroughly trashed over the years, that sewer pipe appearance. Often rifles had front sights replaced with Springfield 1903. Stocks altered. Detailed pics will be needed to determine a good estimate. Attention to the bore condition and front of the stock areas (end).
Serial number and pics.
I'm no authority on Krags but would be glad to look the serial number up and share the pics over on the Krag Forum.
Vic
 

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Discussion Starter #4
A good 1898 can fetch $1000 and 1896s generally will bring a premium on top of that. Records that indicate a military connection will also affect the value.
Condition is everything (as always), plus originality. Many, many bores were thoroughly trashed over the years, that sewer pipe appearance. Often rifles had front sights replaced with Springfield 1903. Stocks altered. Detailed pics will be needed to determine a good estimate. Attention to the bore condition and front of the stock areas (end).
Serial number and pics.
I'm no authority on Krags but would be glad to look the serial number up and share the pics over on the Krag Forum.
Vic
Kerz,
These are the pics obtained so far. I have looked up the SN in Mallory's four books, and did not find this one. I did notice that it was within a few numbers of being in USV units that apparently did serve at Guasimas and San Juan. Of course "close" in number is often an entire miss -- as you well know!
 

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Kerz,
These are the pics obtained so far. I have looked up the SN in Mallory's four books, and did not find this one. I did notice that it was within a few numbers of being in USV units that apparently did serve at Guasimas and San Juan. Of course "close" in number is often an entire miss -- as you well know!
Victorio, I believe the battle at Las Guasimas involved the 1st U.S. Volunteer Cavalry (Rough Riders) and the 10th U.S. Cavalry, both under General Wheeler. As such, they would have been armed with carbines, not full length rifles like the one in your pictures.

The volunteer infantry units, I believe, were equipped with Trapdood Springfields, but the rifle could have made an appearance at San Juan Heights in the hands of regular infantry troops.
 

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My US 1896 Krag carbine that by serial number fell in the transition of the issue of carbines between the 10th Cavalry and the 1st US Volunteer Cavalry. The carbine would have been used at San Jaun Hill by either unit, since both were there.

722943
 

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It is important to understand that the fight in Cuba relied heavily on the Springfield Trapdoor rifle. The Navy had Krags for the Army to replace these rifles on their ships off shore, but because of a spat with the Army, refused to deliver them. Krags used in Cuba were ‘95 and ‘96 Models. The ‘98 was used in the Philippines and is very collectible. With the advent of the ‘03, many Krags found their way into National Guard armories. I also seem to recall that some were sent to the British in WWI.
 
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The Navy had Krags for the Army to replace these rifles on their ships off shore, but because of a spat with the Army, refused to deliver them. Krags used in Cuba were ‘95 and ‘96 Models.
The Navy still had 1895 Lee Navy straight pull rifles. That's what the Marines were armed with when they landed at Guantanimo.

The Krag rifles in Cuba, issued to regular infaantry units, were 1892 Models (production began in 1894 with most altered to 1896 specs) or 1896 Models. Early ones were marked with the year of manufacture, and thus were marked 1894, 1895, 1896 and finally Model 1896.

The carbines, issued to regular cavalry and the 1st Volunteer Cavalry (Rough Riders), were similarly marked 1895, 1896 or Model 1896, although all were considered 1896 models, even those made in 1895.

Most volunteer units, other than the Rough Riders, were armed with Trapdoors as noted.
 

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My 1896 has a 82,000 sr#, also built 1897. From the photos provided, the one you're looking at appears unaltered. Do a close inspection, I've seen a few with cracks in the receiver where the magazine hinge is. Also closely check the bolt lug for any cracks and of course the bore.
 

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I love my Krag, bought about 25 years ago when I had a "sense" they were going to start going up from the $150 average price they were then. I was right, and at the small local show they were mostly priced at $200. I looked at the 3-4 there, and picked my 1898 rifle, 1902 cartoche on the stock. Many of these are found in very good condition, as is mine. I think the US storage methods were very good back in the early 1900s, and they stored them for 20 year or so before starting to release them to the DCM or National Guard units. I'm no expert on their history, just kind of making educated guesses.

Mine will shoot a tight group, even with it's frosted bore. Took it elk hunting several times in the 1990s. Kept it clean, it's still with me. I just wish I'd bought 10 of the WWII 1911A1s that were still about $500 back then....
 

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I won this nice 1896 Krag in a live online auction just two months ago. The serial number range of 63xxx and cartouche show it was born in 1897. I had the auction house send me photos of the cartouches and they were faint but readable.

When I got it, I knew that the stock at some point in its long life was refinished since it looked a bit too nice for a former service firearm. Thus the cartouches can only be seen out in the daylight. Still, it has a nice bright and shiny bore and still retains a lot of original bluing on the barrel.

Here it is with a few accessories including a Krag bayonet--dated 1895 attached to an original Spaulding 60 rd cartridge belt, a period haversack with an original leather strap plus a reproduction canteen. The Spaulding belt was actually designed for mounted troops--hence the saber hang ring.


The description from the auction mentioned the following vague connection to a unit.


Unfortunately, besides the regular 4th US regular infantry regiment, the only volunteer 4th regiment I could find that participated in the Spanish American war was the 4th Illinois volunteer infantry. Since most volunteer units would have been carrying the older Trapdoor, the information in the listing was probably just B.S. provided by the original consignor, so I did not let it influence me. I haven't taken the time to research it any further yet.

Still, I won it for a $1000 bid with a buyer's premium of 18% for a total of $1180. This seems pretty much in line with what Kerz said about an 1898 and later Krag rifles running in the $1000 range with an M1896 bringing a slight premium over that. Before I even started looking for a Krag, I bought the following modestly priced collector's book on the Krag via Amazon. ($24.95)

The American Krag Rifle and Carbine (For Collectors Only®) 2nd Edition

You will see all kinds of prices, but a book like this will help one wade through the mass of misinformation posted by sellers.

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Kerz,
These are the pics obtained so far. I have looked up the SN in Mallory's four books, and did not find this one. I did notice that it was within a few numbers of being in USV units that apparently did serve at Guasimas and San Juan. Of course "close" in number is often an entire miss -- as you well know!
This is what was in Mallory's books, serial numbers near the one being covered here:
83679 - 96Rifle, Report Date 11/14/1898, Co. M 10th USV Inf.
83687 - 96Rifle, Report Date 1899, Co. C 5th USV Inf.

But as I said earlier, "close" in serial number is often regarded as an entire miss. These guns weren't shipped out in consecutive SN's.
 
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I have learned from our Krag Forum brothers that only direct hits are appreciable. Overall the historical military documentation is limited for Krags.
Vic
 

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The fact is that the weapons weren't issued sequentially, they were issued from racks and crates - just the way they were shipped - plus, depending on an individual units' place in the queue and in unit hierarchy (RA vs NG vs Volunteer), they many not have gotten a full issue in one fell swoop.
 

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I have 382689 as an 1898 Krag, if anyone wants to look that up in the Springfield records or where you are referring to, I don't understand all the Krag books. It's too late for the Spanish-American war of course, but maybe went somewhere interesting?
 

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I have 382689 as an 1898 Krag, if anyone wants to look that up in the Springfield records or where you are referring to, I don't understand all the Krag books. It's too late for the Spanish-American war of course, but maybe went somewhere interesting?
I’ll check when I get home this afternoon.
Vic
 

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No luck

723068
 
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