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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need a little help. I just bought a S&W "Baby Russian" revolver and the right stock, on the bottom was broken out by someone prying the grip off the pin. Fortunantly, it is a clean break and I want to make a repair with Epoxy, colored with lamp Black or other fine Carbon Powder. Where do I buy one of these products????? Is there another black powder or product that can be used on the Gutta Percha stock?????
 

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I have two little Smiths with the grips broken around the pins. I think this was a weak area on these as there's not much grip area around there. I haven't tried to repair but one of mine has a 'repair' made of rubber cement dyed black. Not noticeable from 5 ft.
 

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I have had some success with clear epoxy and lamp black. I got the lamp black at a craft store. Mix it with the epoxy to a deep black color. Mine had a large piece missing extending into the checkering. Made mold with clay from the same store. Let it cure for a few days can sand and shape to final contour. I have never found any fine checkering tools to finish my project
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the tips guys. I never thought about a Craft Store! I will get some this week and try to make the repair this week.

Fortunantly for me, there is no damage to the checkering. I will put some grease on the frame, pin and backside of the stocks so I will get an easy release. The final part will be the sanding of the epoxy to match the stock. The final finishing will be with toothpaste to get the shine on the original surfaces. I feel the repair will be almost invisible since it is on just the bottom.

Thanks guys!!!! I just did not know where to buy Lamp Black. If I was still working at Alcoa Aluminum Plants, I could get all the pure Carbon I needed, LOL!
 

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Mr. Abwehr I think Brownell's sell lamp black. Not for sure anymore but I've got it there in the past. fwiw
 

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I have used regular a regular lead pencil for the carbon, split the wood, pull the graphite/lead, place it in aluminum foil, fold and hammer till you get fine powder. mix with epoxy glue and makes for really good repairs.
 

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I've repaired many of those hard rubber grips with 'J-B Weld' and some Testor's 'Flat Black' model paint mixed together.

Some careful clean-up and polishing, and the crack is hardly noticeable.
 

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My wife frequently visits a c moore, joannes, and Michael's. They sell it in a small tube near the art and paint supplies. Don't remember which one I got it at. Try hobby lobby
 

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I grew up in the town where oil was first discovered in NW Pennsylvania. Needless to say they needed a lot of barrels for that oil which in turn means you need a way to measure how much is in each barrel so I worked at a company that made gauge poles for just that purpose. On one side of the pole we painted it black and used lamp black to make it. Well lamp black is incredibly fine stuff and goes airborne really easily.

It was my first time mixing a batch of this stuff and no one warned me to go slow with it. And we made batches of several gallons so I poured a lot of lamp black and then hit it with a high speed drill with paddles to mix it up. I poured away not thinking about much of anything and got it all done in record time, I mean why would one go slow and be cautious when you can go fast and stupid. Later in the day we were working on something and we noticed every time we touched something it smudged black. Well we started walking around the building and pretty much everything we touched including ourselves smudged black. You would rub your arm and it would turn black as it all landed on the hair on your arms. Uh oh!

That stuff was everywhere because I poured that lamp black with reckless abandon not for a moment thinking it might get on anything else. And let me tell you my boss was not happy with me. If that building hadn't burned done 25 years ago that stuff would still be on anything you touched!

So abewhar slow and steady with the lamp black.
 

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Instead of oil or grease, which can contaminate the epoxy, I recommend coating the area with wax.
Johnson's Paste Wax in big yellow cans is available at most any hardware or Walmart store.

Coat the area with a medium-heavy coat and DON'T wipe it off. Give it about 30 minutes to harden and you're in business.

If doing this work I'd stick to a good 1 hour clear epoxy and actual lamp black, although you might be able to use the usual 5 minute epoxy that most stores sell.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Instead of oil or grease, which can contaminate the epoxy, I recommend coating the area with wax.
Johnson's Paste Wax in big yellow cans is available at most any hardware or Walmart store.

Coat the area with a medium-heavy coat and DON'T wipe it off. Give it about 30 minutes to harden and you're in business.

If doing this work I'd stick to a good 1 hour clear epoxy and actual lamp black, although you might be able to use the usual 5 minute epoxy that most stores sell.
Thanks for the tip about using Johnsons Paste Wax. Fortunantly, I have a large canand will follow your directions. I plan to go to Micheals or Hobby Lobby which both are near me for the quality Lamp Black. I have the 1 hr. epoxy currently, so all I needs is the Lamp Black and I will be in business!

I appreciate everyone's help about the Lamp Black and where to find it. Once I get this completed, I will make some pictures of the latest find, LOL!
 

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Thanks for the tip about using Johnsons Paste Wax. Fortunantly, I have a large canand will follow your directions. I plan to go to Micheals or Hobby Lobby which both are near me for the quality Lamp Black. I have the 1 hr. epoxy currently, so all I needs is the Lamp Black and I will be in business!

I appreciate everyone's help about the Lamp Black and where to find it. Once I get this completed, I will make some pictures of the latest find, LOL!
Another thought might be to used the powdered dyes that Brownells sells to color their acra-glass bedding, not that black would be all that hard to match, but other color/shades may be.
There are also many release agents available ( brush-on, spray-on, drying and non-drying) depending on your use application.
Good luck.
 

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This is my 32 safety hammerless second model that I repaired the grip. The right grip which is numbered to the gun was missing the rear 25% of the grip. IMG_20171226_010950_hdr.jpg I left it a little proud hoping to restore the checkering but the repair is solid and sandable. It took a little while to cure hard IMG_20171226_011421_hdr.jpg this is the left side which is in nice shape IMG_20170314_094931_kindlephoto-59886158.jpg my baby Russian has pearl grips. Good luck with your repair
 

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I was thinking plastic or fiberglass supply stores. We used lamp black at Boeing back in the 70s. If you need a parting agent, masking tape (non-sticky side) is a natural parting agent. Learned that from one of the old-timers in the tooling shop. Neither polyester nor epoxy resin will stick to it. This is the old beige masking tape, not the newer, blue "painter's tape."
 

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Here a couple grip fix pix --





I use lampblack usually, with Devcon 2 Ton epoxy -- altho the epoxy will tolerate most any dye other than water based. Art store colors in tube or powder form work well. I sometimes make a test batch to try beforehand. I clean & rough up the glue surfaces for sure bond. On the gun I put a coat of wax & waxed foil to prevent co-lateral unwanted flow or spillage. Replacing a missing piece has sometimes needed a foil-dam to keep from flowing away & possibly more than one application.
 

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I've repaired many of those hard rubber grips with 'J-B Weld' and some Testor's 'Flat Black' model paint mixed together.

Some careful clean-up and polishing, and the crack is hardly noticeable.
I'll second dogface's recommendation of JB Weld, which is available in any store that sells glues (hardware, Home Depot, etc). It bonds really well, dries hard and is easy to sand. I had a grip that was broken in half with a small piece missing from each end of the break. JB weld sealed the break, and also filled in the missing areas after which I sanded them down. I colored the area with a black felt tip pen and polished with shoe polish. You can't tell where the repair is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
You guys have provided a lot of great information. I was hoping to get to the stoer today, but have been busier than I thought today. I had a co-worker pass away last Friday and the funeral today, so that came before gun stuff!
 

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You guys have provided a lot of great information. I was hoping to get to the stoer today, but have been busier than I thought today. I had a co-worker pass away last Friday and the funeral today, so that came before gun stuff!
Eternal rest unto that soul!
 
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Buy lamp black? Take a piece of clean sheet metal and hold it in an oil lamp flame and you have lamp black. No lamp? Candles work well too. A plumbers acetylene torch is perfect. Mix your epoxy right on the black and scrape it all off the sheet metal when done. You'll have a piece ready for the next grip repair:)
 
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