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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Friends,
this is a nothing special, plain .45, 5 1/2, blue Colt from 1932 in very nice condition. Please read the Archive Letter. The cylinder carries the number 49, the grips are numbered - it has been fired a bit but probably never carried.
But it was a special order through Abercrombie&Fitch and went to a R. H. Baird. What I do not understand: Why a special order for such a plain SAA???? And who is R.H. Baird...I found very little on goggle ..no famous lawman or villain...

Peter
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Maybe Mr. Baird wanted that exact type of SAA and he wanted it right away. Date of manufacture could be helpful here.

I have a Colt that was built in 1964 and shipped 2 days later as a shipment of 1 gun. I would like to think that it was built to fill an order, but it could be a coincidence.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Maybe Mr. Baird wanted that exact type of SAA and he wanted it right away. Date of manufacture could be helpful here.

I have a Colt that was built in 1964 and shipped 2 days later as a shipment of 1 gun. I would like to think that it was built to fill an order, but it could be a coincidence.
It is an idea... but this is probably the most common configuration I can imagine...
 

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I have a theory...

By 1932 Colt was only selling a couple hundred SAA's per year, and my bet is... The guy wanted a brand new SAA, and was unable to find a new one in the stores because they just weren't out there.
 

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I also find it interesting that Mr. Baird's address was Detroit but the gun was shipped to New York City. Perhaps he was in the city on a trip and wanted the gun for protection or as a gift to someone?

Do the Archives have access to the old factory orders?
 

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hello, my money is on a safari to Africa and a and f was the place to get outfitted. mr. baird wisely may have wanted a (the most) reliable handgun to carry in the bush, i would have wanted the same.
regards, bro

I also find it interesting that Mr. Baird's address was Detroit but the gun was shipped to New York City. Perhaps he was in the city on a trip and wanted the gun for protection or as a gift to someone?

Do the Archives have access to the old factory orders?
 

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Mr. Baird must have been someone of importance to special order a basically obsolete firearm in the height of the Great Depression.
 

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I also have an A&F shipped letter for a single gun order although with less information on the letter. Of the A&F letters I've seen they all seem to be single gun orders. Maybe someone can post a multiple gun order letter for us to see.
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Hardly.

They were in the factory catalogs, after all - so they were available to one and all, and you didn't have to have money to buy from A&F - you just needed to place the order.

The 5.5" barrel was the most commonly produced, and some men preferred the SAA for a field gun over a DA or semiauto.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Hardly.

They were in the factory catalogs, after all - so they were available to one and all, and you didn't have to have money to buy from A&F - you just needed to place the order.

The 5.5" barrel was the most commonly produced, and some men preferred the SAA for a field gun over a DA or semiauto.
Production was low in 1932 - Cochran says 300. But still this is a totally plain SAA that was not intended as some kind of "working gun".

As I said: "R.H. Baird" could have been a doctor in the Detroit Area.. but that is all I found.
Peter
 

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It may have been something about specifying pounds of trigger pull but generally there is a note about that type of request.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
It may have been something about specifying pounds of trigger pull but generally there is a note about that type of request.
Right you are - but this gun is as plain as a single action Colt can be.
The only thing is Mr. Baird, and even he seems not to have left big traces...
 

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Friends,
this is a nothing special, plain .45, 5 1/2, blue Colt from 1932 in very nice condition. Please read the Archive Letter. The cylinder carries the number 49, the grips are numbered - it has been fired a bit but probably never carried.
But it was a special order through Abercrombie&Fitch and went to a R. H. Baird. What I do not understand: Why a special order for such a plain SAA???? And who is R.H. Baird...I found very little on goggle ..no famous lawman or villain...

Peter
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It was ordered through A&F, possibly thru their catalog. A&F made the purchase and had it shipped directly to Detroit. It didn't have to have special features for the letter to read like this.

As common as a 45 x 5-1/2" blue rub Colt SAA was, if A&F didn't have one in stock, then they had to order this gun for R. H. Baird.
 

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hello, my money is on a safari to Africa and a and f was the place to get outfitted. mr. baird wisely may have wanted a (the most) reliable handgun to carry in the bush, i would have wanted the same.
regards, bro


I like this answer the best!! I recall my brother-in-law made a trip to A&F when he once made a trip to NYC. He is an avid hunter and A&F is like Mecca to some.
 

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I like this answer the best!! I recall my brother-in-law made a trip to A&F when he once made a trip to NYC. He is an avid hunter and A&F is like Mecca to some.
hello, and just to walk into the gun room and see the purdeys, winchesters, and cased sets of hollands was like paradise in the colonies. dem was de days!!!
regards, bro
 
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