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Without a hands on inspection, it looks all correct. In my neighbor hood this gun would have a $6000.00 price tag.

Serial indicates a 1884 manufacture. Must have been on the shelf or awhile before shipping.
 

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I really like the image quality of your etched panel. Here's a similar SAA, only about 6,000 units under yours.
I think the asking price on this one is about 25% high. Nonetheless it does give you something to go on.
Are there British proofs on that gun? None are evident in your photos.

Colt Single Action Army .44-40 Etched Panel for sale.
 

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Expect to see London proof marks on frame, bbl, and cyl. If not all of these, something has been altered.
Since you are from the UK you should know a lot more about this then me but it is my understanding the marks were put on when a gun left the country not when it came in. If it came in in the 1880s and left by means other then official channels then it could have evaded the marks? I am fairly certain this was the case with at least most military issued guns.
 

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Without a hands on inspection, it looks all correct. In my neighbor hood this gun would have a $6000.00 price tag.

Serial indicates a 1884 manufacture. Must have been on the shelf or awhile before shipping.
Having collected heaps of the brit proof single actions and double's, the proofs would only be on the cylinder (which i can see) and under the barrel close to the frame near the ejector housing.
If for sale in Australia, it would be in the $5000-$7000 range, English proof colts seem to be up to 50% lower then strickly US shipped guns, maby they dont have to wild west flair collectors look for.
It sure is a nice etched panel sa though, and you dont see many in that cal shipped to the UK.
Tony
 

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Since you are from the UK you should know a lot more about this then me but it is my understanding the marks were put on when a gun left the country not when it came in. If it came in in the 1880s and left by means other then official channels then it could have evaded the marks? I am fairly certain this was the case with at least most military issued guns.
it is my understanding the marks were put on when a gun left the country not when it came in.
Thats not quiet correct, the guns were proofed when enterring the UK, IF THEY WERE FOR RETAIL SALE.
 
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