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This is my first saa and I am looking for any info about who converted it to a .22 and if any of it is original. I have a colt letter that said it was nickel and had ivory grips when it was delivered to Texas in 1888. Both of the s/n are the same on the bottom.The gun shoots great. Thanks for the help
 

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It could have been any number of people. Other than the barrel and cylinder linings, and the firing pin change, it looks original.
 

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Looks like someone sleeved the barrel and cylinder and changed out the hammer and probably cut a slot for the rimfire in the hammer slot cut out.

Did it ship as a 4-3/4" and what dealer did it ship to?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Yes it was a 4 3/4 barrel and it was shipped to J.B. Mitchell Company Corpus Christi Texas. It was a 45/c. Thank you for the help I just started to collect single action revolves.
 

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That is a great shipping point. Can’t you imagine what it looked like the day it arrived in corpus with those ivories?
I’m guessing there is a stock pin in the triggerguard because it probably left the factory with 2 piece ivories. One piece grips would have normally been phased out about 6 years earlier. They should have done the conversion to a Simmons shipped gun and left the corpus shipped gun alone!
 

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Y'know, I bet no one cared...

It was an old Colt that was handy, and was cheap, and if the conversion didn't work out right, there were plenty more available.

When this sort of thing was done, these hadn't reached any real level of collector interest, like they have today, and factory letters were few and far between.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Does this gun have any value or should I just enjoy shooting it? I am probably just going to keep shooting in anyway.
 

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I would think you could get upside down in cost pretty quickly if you had any work done to it. I’ve seen guys who bought a gun for $500 spend $3000 restoring it and then have a $2000 refinished/restored gun when it is all said and done. But to each his own, it’s never looked like a good plan to me.
 

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Well cool find...it would all depend on your investment...if u bought it right...would be great to put it back that way...otherwise sell it or trade it if u don't want it...kinda cool to find one like that...God Bless,John
If it were me and I bought it right...why not return it back to centerfire...

Sent from my SM-S727VL using Tapatalk
 
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During the 1960's a lot of these were made. Cristy Gun Works and several gunsmiths converted these. The better conversions had new cylinders and barrels made in 22 caliber. I converted 2 or 3 using inserts like yours. If you are lucky the inserts and barrel liner are glued in with epoxy. If you are real lucky they just glued the barrel liner over the rifling with out drilling out the barrel. In that case you can drive out the liners by heating the metal to about 250 degrees. Get a new hammer with a wabble firing pin, a Ubertti will work, and redrill the firing pin hole and you will have semi-original gun. This gun is with about, in my opinion, 500.00 but if you can convert it back to a 45 for less then 100.00 then I think it's value would be about 900.00. Take it to a gunsmith and see how much work it will take. The hammer looks original maybe just drill it out. The front sight has been filed but just leave as they are expensive to fix.
 

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This is my first saa and I am looking for any info about who converted it to a .22 and if any of it is original. I have a colt letter that said it was nickel and had ivory grips when it was delivered to Texas in 1888. Both of the s/n are the same on the bottom.The gun shoots great. Thanks for the help
I can't help on who converted your pistol but the work has been done and is quit unique the way it is. I'd keep it for what it is . All the talk about putting it back , then you wouldn't have what you already have. Good luck on your hunt for info.
Remember , it ain't gonna be the same if you change it (that's me talking to myself) . I say nice score on a first buy. Tom.
 

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This is my first saa and I am looking for any info about who converted it to a .22 and if any of it is original. I have a colt letter that said it was nickel and had ivory grips when it was delivered to Texas in 1888. Both of the s/n are the same on the bottom.The gun shoots great. Thanks for the help
I see you have plenty of answers. Here's one from outside the box: because I once pursued the notion of acquiring a .44 rimfire SAA, I learned from one of my official Colt reference books that some of these (and not many were made overall) were converted by Colt's to 22 rimfire because the .44 rimfire was obsolete by the time it appeared in the SAA and only Mexico wanted it [no military calibers permitted there, so no .45 LC); and it was already fitted with a rimfire hammer and the frame notched for it vs. the firing pin in centerfire hammers. Lots of information in A Study of the Colt Single Action Revolver by Kopec et al, about how to tell the difference centering on the frame being cut at the factory to accept the rimfire hammer.

There Kopec notes "Of our survey recorded, converted .22 RF shipments -- a total of eighteen -- all occurred during 1888".

So: it would've helped to know what caliber your SAA letters in :)
 

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I would enjoy it as it is and shoot it. Any money you put into it is just throwing away good money.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks for all of the reply’s. I am going to keep shooting it as a .22. After shooting it on Sunday I am hooked on single action Colt’s. It is much better then my Colt copies.
 

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It looks like .22 rimfire conversions are popping out of the woodwork all over! I like the patina on your gun that gives it the "been used a lot" look. Several years ago I bought a Colt Lightning that had not only been converted from 38 Colt to 22 R/F but had the grip reconfigured to look like an SAA. Here's a picture or two:

1883 Lightning converted to 22 r/f in 1953 by George Matthews of California. Grips are ivory.
Lightning+22+11401176694.jpg

A close up of the cylinder conversion that looks a lot like the cylinder on your gun.
 

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