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Took a couple of extras up to the LGS to sell on consignment and after filling out the paperwork saw a 1903 Pocket Hammer in the display. I've passed on a couple of these over the years so had to take a look. I have always admired the clean lines of these early JMB designs. It has some rust but it looked like it was in otherwise good shape so I asked the owner if the listed price was the best he could do. He paused, looked at the two I had brought in to sell, looked at the Hammer and asked if I just wanted to take it home and leave the other two with him. Trying to play it cool for all of about .02 seconds I said yes. So here she is...
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You can see a little of the rust on her. She's currently soaking in CLP and then I'll try to get some off and see how she cleans up. I don't think the mag is original since it isn't the two tone bluing like Hammerless mags I've seen.

From the serial number lookup she dates to 1927, the last year of production of 400 some odd pistols. Letter has been ordered to we'll see what turns up with that.

Thought I would share. Any suggestions on removing the rust would be appreciated. Also any suggestions on getting the fireblue parts to show blue again would be great.
 

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The fire blued parts were discontinued Circa 1914.
A 1927 would not have them.
Your wedge looks like it may have been altered/replaced.
I think the mag is correct.
When the experts chime in, we'll see if IIRC
 

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Those early automatics had the most fantastic, high polish you'll ever see. As far as any small amounts of rust, you need to be very careful. Any rust particles that get rubbed off will scratch that fine finish, if you rub them along it. I would just coat it with CLP for a day or two, then gently try to rub just the rust spots with a cloth, turning it often. Remember, any rust particles that slough off will scratch, so don't rub the entire section with the cloth, just the part with a spot. Also, because the polish is so smooth, they will sometimes flake off some blue, like your seeing. The best bet it put oil on it to try to preserve it in it's current state.

I have been doing this to a 1912 revolver I got a month ago, you can't do much for these high polish years, and can mess them up more if you try too hard.
 

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Nice find. Not to much to clean up on that one. Put a little Kroil on those spots and let it soak for a few days. Then do exactly as azshot posted above.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The fire blued parts were discontinued Circa 1914.
A 1927 would not have them.
Your wedge looks like it may have been altered/replaced.
I think the mag is correct.
When the experts chime in, we'll see if IIRC
That would explain why I can never see the blue color on any of my old guns. :unsure:
 
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Thanks all. I'm looking forward to getting this one out and shooting it. I'm intrigued by the "dead end" design of it to see what might of been.
 

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Very nice pistol!
I'm not in the market to buy anything else EXCEPT for one of these pocket hammers - if I could find one at a good price! You are fortunate to have an original magazine as those can be quite pricey if you need to buy one.
Kim
 

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I can't discern your serial number 46335? but it's a nice acquisition and near the end of the production which was #47226 ( about 31,250 total produced from 1903-1927) I've used a copper penny on the rust after Kroil's, but I don't recommend it. I got this old one #46245 for $500 in 2017 - not much to look at - but there are some beaters out there.
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