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Discussion Starter #1
I have come across some really neat looking ones, but they aren't stabilized. The retailer said that its so dense the process doesn't really doesn't do much. In a way I'm inclined to agree but I also wouldn't want to spend big money only to have them crack. Anyone here have experience with mammoth ivory in particular?
 

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Made a set of one piece years ago, but the smell drove me out of the house. They smell like salty, dead fish when you work them. The end result was great, mush like standard ivory, but yellow.
They polished the same way.

JP
 

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Over the 60 plus yrs I've been working on colt's I've probably made over 150 pair of these,the pair pictured may be mastodon [pre- wooly mammoth] I've got a pair of these on one of my .44's that look like petrified wood.I'm not sure what "not stabilized" means in regards to these.Please explain.
 

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From what I understand it involves curing the material (which I don't know how that would apply in this scenario, if 10,000+ years didn't do it I don't know what would) and then flooding it with some kind of polymer while applying a vacuum to draw the liquid into the pores.

The thought is that ivory is so dense to begin with it doesn't absorb much of the polymer. Yet some outfits still do it, which is why I wonder. I'm kind of in the "better safe than sorry" camp.
 

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Stabilizing ivory, including Mammoth, does no good for the reasons you were told but folks still do it as a selling point. The OP stocks are bark or extierior Mammoth which is desireable. Mammoth can and does seperate, like the rings of an onion, if it's allowed to dry out. Put a light wipe of baby oil on them every month or so.
 
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