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My newest reloading manual lists 23 grains of H335 with a max load of 25.3 grains.

My old Speer #10 reloading manual lists 25 grains to start and a max of 27 grains.

This is with mag primers and 55 grain bullet.

Why such a big difference? Too many lawyers?

What is a good H335 load for the 5.56.

rmc
 

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BELIEVE THE LATTER as the changes are from much better pressure testing equipment !! I worked for two ammunition comapniees and NEVER saw a lawyer in either plant.
The Hodgdon manual and their website has a ton of data for the 5.56 with H335 propellent.
 

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BELIEVE THE LATTER as the changes are from much better pressure testing equipment !! I worked for two ammunition comapniees and NEVER saw a lawyer in either plant.
The Hodgdon manual and their website has a ton of data for the 5.56 with H335 propellent.
Don't you mean Former?
 

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YEP, you are right......but keep 'em guessing...

AND LET ME ADD THIS : always use the very latest loading data for any cartridge and any propellent.
Agreed, although I have had to go to some of my ancient reloading manuals for cross-referencing my old military surplus powders.
 

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Ball powder can pressure spike when nearing max loads plus the fact that military brass has less capacity. The difference in chamber sized from all the different guns can have an effect on the powder limits. I'm sure they reduced it to cover all the variables possible. It's not so much lawyers as it is reputation of the company and prevention of accidents. I always start at the bottom and work up until I find the sweet spot. Max loads are not always the most accurate and nothing is to be gained by a few FPS in velocity when the bullets hit everywhere.
 

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I always check out the load data the powder manufacturer provides for the final word. They probably check every batch of their product, while the guys that publish the reloading manuals only do so every couple of years.
 

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the newer load data would be more valid with the newer lots of powder. chemical propellants may vary slightly from lot to lot. case capacities vary with manufacturers, with bullet choices, primer choices, and such the key here is 'pressure' and learning to look for signs of pressure. Start on the low end and work up slowly all the while looking for pressure signs and group size. hotter and faster does not always mean 'tighter'. in fact for handgun and short range rifle competition i have been known to down-load in order to have good groups, small recoil, and faster recovery.
Always use a book or resource you trust and Always complete good documentation. I recommend a big 3 ring binder and log everything you do!
 

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This is an orderly work up in a Ruger #1V with H335 55 gr; unfired, 28, 29, 30, and 31 gr.
Hodgdon lists 25.3 gr. These shots were more than that. H335 works up in an orderly fashion.
The Ruger #1 has no ejector, extractor, or stretch marks.


This is what a 223 work up looks like with an erratic peaky powder like Blue Dot


This is what a Colt AR15 does to a hot load [4200 fps 35 gr with Blue Dot]

What does it all mean?
The Ruger #1 is better for going over listed max.
H335 is better for going over listed max.
Blue Dot is a poor choice for going over listed max.
The AR15 is a poor choice for going over the listed max.
 
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