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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone have info based on experience rather than assumption about this? I keep seeing postings stating that the way to tell a repro from the real McCoy is they have metric thread screws. Maybe some do but for sure, not all. I bought a set of Uberti SAA screws ($15 Dixie or Numrich) and they fit Colts perfectly except the hammer screw which is smaller diameter. My project piece below has standard American thread screws & it I think early production, is totally un marked.

 

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I keep seeing postings stating that the way to tell a repro from the real McCoy is they have metric thread screws.

In my opinion no one can say "Yes, that's true", or "No, it is false."

The reason being that foreign made mass produced copies (of the modern era) has been going on for almost 60 years by a large number of manufactures and importers. Certainly there are differences in each as to dimensions, tolerances, bore diameter, screw threads, and so on.

John Gross
 

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rhmc, I think a better way to look at this is, since Colt's did not make any originals with metric screws, if you are looking at a questionable piece AND it has metric screws, then it certainly is a reproduction or copy.

On the other hand, if the questionable piece has standard threads, like your revolver, then it might be authentic OR it might be a reproduction/copy, and other clues must be considered, such as the difference in the diameter of the hammer screw, the markings and so on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
johngross Thanks, it's info I knew but good to have someone else say it - to get the word around. Probably on this forum right now someone is telling folks that US threads are an identifier a piece is not a repro. It would be a sad case if someone bought a phony on the basis of irresponsible info.

Of possible interest, in 1949 I had talked with a gunmaker in Spain about making Colt copies. In trying to buy a nice '51 Navy to copy from an old collector friend, he was so horrified that I would consider such a deception I gave up the idea. I think it was Val Forgett that broke the ice on the repros with his Navy Arms.
 

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You are right. Val Forget was the father of the modern Colt percussion repros. However, there were various factors built into these repros which made them fairly easy for an experienced collector to recognize.
1. All Eytye replicas, except some Uberti's used metric screws.
2. All original Colt percussion barrels had progressive rifling, Italian repros have standard rifling.
3. The cylinder scenes on repros (except 2nd and 3rd generation Colts) are differant from those on originals.
4. The measurements of various parts are not exactly the same.
5. Many early Italian repros made by the minor manufacturers had imperfections (like a mis-shaped trigger guard or bent loading lever) that were carried forward from the originals from which they were copied.
 
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