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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Can anyone tell me the correct way to remove the ejector ratchet from the ejector rod on a model 1892/1889? I know it is a reverse thread, but the ratchet is staked at four points to keep it from turning off. I'm wondering what the best way to remove it would be, without destroying the ratchet, cylinder or rod?Thanks!
 

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Cylinder disassembly on the pre-1970's old style Colt ejector rod systems is always risky.
To disassemble, you must have two special tools. One tool is a wrench that fits over the ejector ratchets, the second tool is a tube wrench that is used to unscrew the ejector rod bushing.
You CANNOT disassemble the rod bushing without the tube wrench. You can buy a Colt tube wrench from Brownell's.

To unscrew the ejector, you can buy a tool from Brownell's, make one from some flat steel plate, or (I don't really recommend this) you can use a socket from a socket set that will fit snuggly over the ratchets.

Before beginning cylinder disassembly, unscrew and remove the ejector rod head.
To do this, put three EMPTY cases in the chambers to support the ejector rod splines.
Use brass, copper, or lead pads to hold the rod head in a vise and unscrew the rod head. The rod head has RIGHT HAND threads.

To disassemble the ejector, push the ejector rod to raise the ejector up out of the recess in the cylinder, and use a tool to unscrew the ejector from the rod.
I don't know for sure about the old Colt 1892 but no later Colt has "Reverse threads". The threads are probably the same standard right hand threads used on later Colt's.
Hopefully someone who knows will post, but you need to KNOW before attempting disassembly since it's risky enough as is.
Unscrewing the ejector allows removing the cylinder from the crane assembly.

To remove the ejector rod and spring from the crane you MUST have the tube wrench to unscrew the bushing from the crane shaft.
Before attempting to unscrew it, soak the assembly in some Kroil. These bushings are often frozen in place by dried lube, fouling, and age.
If you aren't careful the slots will get chewed up and removal is impossible without ruining the ejector rod. Note also, the tube wrench itself is fragile and easily damaged.

The risk of disassembly with these old style rod assemblies is the staking on the end of the rod that locks the ejector in place.
The staking often distorts the threads on the end of the rod, and when you attempt to screw the ejector back on, in spite of how careful you are, the ejector goes on crooked, ruining the rod.
I always used a die to chase the threads before reassembly to insure the ejector went on correctly.
You might be able to at least slightly even up the threads by carefully using a small triangular needle file to straighten the threads a bit.

Here's the ejector wrench needed to remove the ejector. You can make one by cutting and filing a hole in some flat steel that will fit over the ratchets, or (Again I don't recommend it) use a snug fitting socket.

COLT WRENCH | Brownells

Here's the ejector rod bushing tube wrench. You MUST have this to disassemble the bushing. Nothing else will do:

Crane Bushing Tool : COLT CRANE BUSHING TOOL | Brownells

After reassembly, you can make a ejector staking punch from a small screwdriver to re-stake the ejector, or you can use Loctite Blue to secure it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Awesome! Thanks for the reply! The thread on the ratchet end of the ejector rod definitely has left hand threads - as in photograph of a spare ratchet and rod. I believe this is because the cylinder in the old 1892 and 1889s turns in the opposite direction to later Colt revolvers (left, against the gate, if your holding the pistol and looking down the sights). Looks like a 9/16 or 14mm socket will grip the ratchet fairly tightly....I've ordered the bushing tool from Brownells - any idea what the proper die/tap might be used to chase the threads? The od of the threads is about .180...
 

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PM Bob Best (COLTDAGUY) and see if he knows.

Buck
 
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