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I have recently acquired what I am reasonably sure is a Mod. 1892 New Army & Navy in .41 Colt. The only barrel markings are DA 41 but physically everything matches with the Mod.1892. The several numbers on the frame are 836 which I believe is an assembly number. On the bottom of the butt frame listed on top of each other is 118 418 which I take to be the serial number. If so this makes this an 1899 Mfg.
The gun is in excellant condition and I would like to shoot it a little after further restoration. Since .41 Colt is no longer readily available I would need to handload softly. Does anyone have any suggestions where I could get reasonable load data or information on this cartridge such as dimensions etc. My preliminary info leads me to believe I could load smokeless with mild charges without undue pressures.
Any info on loading or the gun itself and/or sources of info would be appreciated.

Thanks
 

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I've bought .41 cartridges from Cowboy Supplies and there is another cartridge maker than sells them for less if you're interested.
 

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Welcome to the forum . I think you're going to enjoy your DA Colt . 1 usually leads to 2 . /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif
Mine's from about 1907 .

 

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The last patent date on top of the barrel is probaly the March 1895 date which would be correct for an 1889 gun. But I do not think this is a M-1892. I believe production of 1892s stopped in 1894 or 1895, so yours is probably the M-1895 variant. Probably Bob Best (ColtDAguy), whose book on these guns is a "must have", will answer this more thoroughly. 118418 is indeed the serial number.
 

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Hi Zulu6,
Thanks for the kind words about my book!

Serial number 118418 should be a Colt New Army Model or a Colt New Navy Model revolver depending on the style of grips it came with... It will have the barrel Patent Date ending in 1895. The patent date on the barrel changed from the one ending in "...1888" to the one ending in 1895 with the introduction of F.B. Felton's patented cylinder locking mechanism. This occurred about serial number 60000 in the Army contract revolvers and about 68xxx in the civilian model New Army revolvers and the New Navy revolvers...

Thanks again for the KIND WORDS! Bob Best
 

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[ QUOTE ]
The last patent date ... would be correct for an 1889 gun.

[/ QUOTE ]

Well now, my fingers got ahead of my thinking organ ~ I meant to say 1899, not 1889. Sorry about that little bit of confusion ~ let's put it down to a brain-fart.
 

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Mcg6637,
Welcome to the forum! I think you will enjoy your new purchase. You can tell whether your gun is the New Army or the New Navy by the grips. Mine, from 1903, (see pic below) is the New Army because of the presence of the rampant horse on the grips. Guy Sayer's is the New Navy because his stocks just say "Colt" without the horse. Is yours a 4 1/2" barrel like mine and Guy's? How about some pics?
Guy,
Outstanding 1892 New Navy! How did you manage to find the old box of ammo? Any idea on the vintage of the ammo? 1940's maybe? I have an 1892 New Army (different only in the presence of the Colt rampant on the stocks), that looks as good as yours, also in .41. I have not yet fired mine, because I believe it to be in unfired condition judging by the very shiny chambers and bore. I figure that if someone had fired it, some slight rings would have been left in the chambers since they are bored straight through in the .41. Here's a pic (I have to take a closer picture with my new digital camera. My old digital camera did not have enough resolution to go closer than this):
 

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Thank you . Your's looks good too , but I agree a closer photo would help .

Finding things is one of the percs of being the buyer in our family gun shop . /forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif
The ammo turned up several years ago . I think your estimate is good . 1940's maybe 50's ?
 
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